Consumers who used their credit cards at a variety of Hilton Hotels-owned properties between November of last year and now may have noticed some strange activity on their credit cards. Thanks to point-of-sale hacking at some of the properties, an unknown number of guests have had their credit card information stolen, according to a statement from the property chain.

When we think of major-name data breaches that affect millions of consumers, we probably think of teams of elite hackers infiltrating a network by exploiting a vulnerability in the technology. But sometimes, a data breach is the work of a good old-fashioned crook and not the result of sophisticated cybercrime skills.

In a move that has been a long time coming—literally, since it was first mandated in 2013 and again in 2015—the Pentagon has finally issued its new Rule on how defense contractors will report suspected cybercrimes.

A spring 2015 data breach has resulted in one and half million residents of Indiana—approximately one-fourth of the state’s population—having their medical and identifying information stolen by hackers.

Cybersecurity firm Trustwave provides an invaluable public service each year when it releases its annual report on data breach activity. This report, the 2015 Trustwave Global Security Report, examines the ways hacking attempts and data breaches were perpetrated, which sectors of industry are hit the hardest, even the corporate and consumer behaviors that lead to data compromise. (Did you know that “Password1” is still the most commonly used password?)

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