Privacy

Facebook - the social network giant has posed the opportunity for its users to vote on changes to their privacy policies. The focus wraps around how the network uses ‘user' information through data collection practices and the use of that data for advertising. The giant is aiming at providing clear explanations to its users of how information is shared. In other words, users will have options to control how their information is shared. The voting was opened on June 1, 2012 and will close June 8, 2012.

Last spring, it was revealed that iPhones and Android mobile phones send individual's "user location data" back to their respective companies, Apple and Google. Initially the news was met by an angry uproar from citizens concerned that their right to privacy was being collectively violated. It didn't slow down sales of either iPhones or Androids however, both of which posted significant gains last year. While Google is quick to point out that the information is stored anonymously, consumer concern has prompted Reps. Ed Markey (D-Mass) and Joe Barton (T-Texas) to call on the Federal Trade Commission to investigate whether Google's privacy policies violate a previous settlement reached with the FTC last year.

Just how is it that companies always seem to know just how to advertise to us? Ever get a chill up your spine when Target sends you a coupon for the exact type of jacket you'd been thinking of purchasing for the last week? If it feels like internet marketers know what products you're likely to be interested in, it's because they do. It is well known that internet activity can be tracked by marketers and used to more effectively reach the consumers who are likely to be interested in the product or service they offer. What is less widely understood is how different websites track your information, and how they use it. Simply changing your privacy settings in your browser can limit the information that you share across the entire spectrum of internet advertising. But what if you want to go deeper?

A company called OneID is developing some innovative and interesting solutions to identity and password security. Vinod Khosla, Founder of Khosla Ventures, one of the principle groups that invested heavily in bringing OneID to market, briefly outlined why his company was willing to infuse 7 figures of capital into this relatively unknown company in the information security space.

Facebook privacy seems to be an ever more common theme of discussion. While the positive uses for Facebook and social networking platforms like it are numerous, use is not without risk. Aside from malicious use of personal information stored on Facebook, controlling how you share your information is an imperative skill set for anyone who has a Facebook page and makes a living in the corporate world, where unflattering pictures or posts could result in a negative impact on one's career. It's important to note that photos and posts you're tagged in can show up on your profile even if you didn't post them yourself.

Most of us at some point in our lives have had to struggle our way through the difficult task of sorting through old pictures, scrap books, and family albums of a deceased friend or relative. The idea being that family members and loved ones may cherish the memories associated with these deeply personal reminders of a person's life and experiences.

Traveling overseas offers a unique set of risks for American consumers. Travelers by necessity have to carry several pieces of sensitive information like a passport, bank cards, drivers license, and an assortment of additional documents that could put them at risk if lost or stolen.

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