When it comes to web browsers, you have options. The ultimate goal of any web browser is to provide people with a better Internet experience. Regardless of your preference, ask yourself what makes for a better Internet experience?

browser security

According to Firefox, they provide an "open community" where the key features are "openness, innovation, and opportunity." It gives the users the ability to "shape their own online lives." In terms of privacy and security, Firefox offers the add-on Flagfox 4.1.11 - said to provide several tools like site safety checks, malware checks, Whois (domain search - who owns the website), page code validation, and display of a flag to tell the user the location of the current website's server, amongst others. This is supposed to add an extra layer of awareness to the user's browsing experience, and the user has the ability the select these features or customize their own actions. Firefox's goal is to be "unobtrusive" - thus, Flagfox does not actually track anything, nor does it send the information anywhere.

Google Chrome on the other hand, is dedicated to "help protect you and your computer from malicious websites as you browse the web." This web search engine features safe browsing, sandboxing, and automatic updates. For Google Chrome's safe browsing, users are informed with a warning message if the site they are visiting poses a malware or phishing threat - "Warning: Visiting this site may harm your computer!" Like Firefox, which also offers updates, Google Chrome offers automatics updates. These updates check for the latest security features, and require no action on behalf of the user. According to Google, their feature Sandbox adds an extra layer of protection by "protecting against malicious web pages that try to leave programs on your computer, monitor your web activities, or steal private information from your hard drive." It prevents the self-installation of malware to your computer. Software Engineer, Nicholas Sylvain, notes that Sandbox was meant to be generic; therefore, it is not just limited to Google - which means that it can be used by others if they share Google's "multi-process architecture."

Whether your preferred web browser is Firefox or Google Chrome, both seem to place an emphasis on browser security - of course, through different approaches. Yet, nonetheless, they both express a deep concern for their users' interests - an interest that lies in the power of the internet.

"Google Chrome vs Firefox: Which is safer?" was written by Gabby Beltran. Gabby is the Public Information Officer and a Bilingual Victim Advisor at the Identity Theft Resource Center.

 

ITRC Sponsors and Supporters 

 

 

 

 

Go to top

 

The TMI Weekly

Breaches here, identity theft there and invasions of privacy everywhere... Should you be worried and, if so, how can you protect yourself? Sign up now to receive The TMI Weekly and get the latest hot topics in identity theft, data breaches and privacy and helpful information on how to protect your information.