If you have scratched below the surface of the avalanche of articles on identity theft, scams, cyber-security, or related topics, you have probably run across the term "spoofing." However, even many of us that work in the field are not very good at explaining to others what the term means, and the various ways the term might be used. So, here goes....

From www.dictionary.com:

spoof; noun

  1. a mocking imitation of someone or something, usually light and good-humored; lampoon or parody: The show was a spoof of college life.
  2. a hoax; prank.

In the context of cyber-security and related subjects, "spoofing" means providing false information in order to make the intended victim think the communications has come from either someone they know, or a business or entity that they would tend to trust. However, there are a number of types of "spoofing", some more technical than others:

  • IP spoofing is a technique used to make a computer user think that a particular Internet IP being presented is a safe computer/server, and should be trusted. Most of us don't directly confront this type of spoofing, and probably are unaware of how it works. Just like phone numbers, IP addresses are supposed to signal a unique address or location across the Internet, so faking an IP address can be used by criminals as a method of becoming part of a trusted network. A consumer is unlikely to be directly confronted with IP spoofing, unless they are working in a technical field.

  • Caller ID Spoofing is used to make an incoming call present a phone number that the intended victim might know or trust. However, the number appearing on the Caller ID is not the real calling number, and "spoofing" the number is used for exactly that purpose, to gain trust in a situation when none should be given. With the advent of VOIP or Internet-based phones, the ability to make an incoming call look like it was from San Diego, when the caller is in Russia, is a fact. Caller ID cannot be trusted to determine anything about the caller. Caller ID Spoofing is done quite often, and the average consumer is often in the dark as far as knowing who is really making the call. If in doubt, the best policy is to disengage from the call, then look up the company by name, and call a listed number for the company to inquire about the contact. It should be remembered that people who do business with you already have the information about you, your account number, etc. It is an entirely different situation if you call the company, and are asked for credentials before they will discuss your business with them. However, if the call is coming from them to you, they are the ones that need to prove who they are before you give them any information. Be warned!

  • Email Address Spoofing is probably the most common type of spoofing. Most of us have seen this many times on incoming email, although we may not have recognized it. All of us observe the senders name/address on incoming emails to see who the sender might be, and whether we think about it or not, we tend to give credibility to that email based upon any previous knowledge we may have of the purported sender. Spoofing the "From:" address is often done as part of a fraudulent scheme. If the "From:" address makes you think the email should be trusted, then you are much more likely to click on a link or take other action, or otherwise give some credibility to an email that is coming from a complete stranger, and possibly a thief. Many of the emails used in "Phishing" schemes will have spoofed sending addresses. In fact, a more deadly form of this attack, called "Spear Phishing" uses email addresses from someone recognized as an authority, such as a highly placed executive of your company, to make your response even more likely. You are not going to turn down a request from your Vice President are you? And, it's a given that website links in these spoofed emails cannot be trusted: they are spoofed also, and will very rarely point your web browser to the address that the link purports to be. Altogether, it is wise for all of us to be wary of incoming email, unless we are very sure of the sender and the authenticity of the message.

  • SMS or Text Spoofing: In a similar fashion to Caller ID and email spoofing, it is also possible for a text message (SMS) to appear to be from a trusted source, while it really is from a quite different sender. In a manner similar to other types of spoofing, be very aware when a text message invites you to take actions, or strongly implies a course of action that you had not anticipated. Like other forms of spoofing, the best answer is to be suspicious and fact check, before you act.

Spoofing is a part of the world we live in now, and it is a key element of the "social engineering" used against consumers in attempts to commit fraud and identity theft. Being skeptical and checking information by other means is really the key to avoid becoming a victim.

If you found this information helpful, you may want to consider taking part in the Identity Theft Resource Center's Anyone3 fundraising campaign.  For more information or to donate please visit http://www.idtheftcenter.org/anyone-3

 

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