Just how is it that companies always seem to know just how to advertise to us? Ever get a chill up your spine when Target sends you a coupon for the exact type of jacket you'd been thinking of purchasing for the last week? If it feels like internet marketers know what products you're likely to be interested in, it's because they do. It is well known that internet activity can be tracked by marketers and used to more effectively reach the consumers who are likely to be interested in the product or service they offer. What is less widely understood is how different websites track your information, and how they use it. Simply changing your privacy settings in your browser can limit the information that you share across the entire spectrum of internet advertising. But what if you want to go deeper?

 

In order to truly understand how each site you interact with tracks your information, and just who they share it with, would require the consumer to read each individual privacy policy for every single website they frequent. By law the terms of use and related privacy policy must outline exactly what information they harvest from you, exactly how they use it, and with whom they are sharing it. There is no law however, against making your terms of service long, using lots of tiny print, or against writing it in legalese jargon that makes it very difficult for the average consumer to understand. 

There is a company with a new product that seeks to address this particular issue. PrivacyChoice has developed a digital service that indexes and disseminates privacy policies from a multitude of various websites, and has developed a scale designed to rate these sites based on how they collect and use your personal data. Their idea is to provide a one-stop easy tool that will allow consumers, site publishers, and administrators to compare various privacy policies across a given field at a glance. The hope is that not only will this spur more careful web shopping and browsing by the consumer, but will also provide greater exposure to how companies act with your information, making it advantageous from a public relations perspective for companies to create stronger privacy policies, and to encourage more responsible handling of consumer data.

Specifically, PrivacyChoice measures whether a website shares personal user data with other sites, how long the site retains that data, and whether there is a confirmation process to confirm eventual deletion of that data. Users who visit privacyscore.com can search for Web sites they wish to have scored. Users also can download a plug-in app for their web browsers that, when activated, will show a privacy score at the top of each Web site they visit. There is also a downloadable plug-in that will function like an additional tool-bar in your browser that will show you the privacy score of various sites as you surf the web.

"What Is PrivacyScore and What Does It Do?" was written by Matt Davis. Matt is a Victim Advisor at the Identity Theft Resource Center. We welcome you to post/reprint the above article, as written, giving credit to and linking back to the ITRC Blog.

 

ITRC Sponsors and Supporters 

 

 

 

 

Go to top