Valentine’s Day is just around the corner and many people are looking to swipe right on a match through a dating app in hopes of meeting their suitor in real life. In 2018, Tindr alone processed a record 1.6 billion swipes a day. With 40 percent of Americans switching to online dating, there’s now an app for every kind of user preference including dog lovers, foodies and celebrity look alikes. With love in the air, scammers are also upping their game on these platforms in order to get your money or personal information. Let’s talk about how to swipe left on a romance scam.

Many popular dating apps like Tinder and Zoosk have reported numerous incidents of romance scams taking place on their platforms. Scammers are becoming more advanced in their techniques including using chatbots to reach more people at a faster rate and evolving their messages to remain current. To avoid being caught, scammers might also try to lure you off the dating app by claiming they are canceling their account or some other excuse. Don’t go breaking your heart or your bank, read more about how to detect a romance scam here.

When using dating apps you should always be conscious of the information you disclose and who you choose to talk to. Be extra leery if someone gives you excessive compliments, reveals in-depth information about themselves immediately, is located outside your country, asks for money or expresses interest in marrying right away. If you come across a scammer, report their profile right away to the company they have an account with. Never send anyone from a dating app money, passwords or login info to your accounts or personal contact information.

Who would’ve thought that swiping right on a popular dating app could get you in the hands of an identity thief? Kerrie Roberts with sponsor, Experian and Eva Velasquez of Identity Theft Resource Center weighs in on the ever so popular, “romance scams”.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Read next: What’s the Latest Threat From Your Internet Connected Toys?

Malware is a growing threat, one that can impact everyone from a casual computer user to a Fortune 500 company. More than just a virus, malware is more like a catch-all term for any kind of malicious software that can infect a computer and be used for harm. Now, thanks to a new Swiss initiative and a team of volunteers, cybercriminals have a little less leverage for attacking computers.

The project, URLHaus, relied on volunteers within the cybersecurity company to seek out websites that distribute malware. These websites can infect your computer even if you don’t engage or if you visited by mistake, and it’s a common tactic that hackers use when they get you to fall for a phishing attempt. More than 100,000 of these websites have been identified and taken down in the last ten months.

A malicious website is just one of many different avenues for infecting your computer, but it’s a widely used method of attack. When a scammer sends out a phishing email that spoofs a known company, for example, the link within the email will often take the victim to a harmful website where the malware infection takes place. Common phishing emails include copycat messages from your bank telling you there’s a problem with your account, fake emails from known retailers like Amazon or PayPal, requests to verify your identity or account information, and many other believable messages.

Scammers can also use social media to get their victims to visit a harmful website. Private messages that appear to come from someone you know, telling you to click here to get this incredible deal or see these unbelievable pictures they found of you, for example, are widespread. Of course, actually paid ads for interesting products and fantastic sales can also redirect users to a fake website.

Once you visit the website and interact with it, the malware is installed on your computer or mobile device. It might be ransomware that locks up your computer, spyware or adware that tracks your online activity, a keylogger that steals everything you type (including account logins), and more.

So how does the cybersecurity industry fight back? One website at a time, which is why the project and its volunteers are so crucial to protecting tech users. Unfortunately, finding these websites scattered across the vast world wide web is a slow and tedious process; of course, getting the companies who host the sites to take them down can take even longer, about an average of eight days from the date of notification.

While the volunteers continue this vital work, the next step for URLHaus is to help those web hosting companies take action more immediately. Some companies respond within a day, while others take as long as a month. The bigger the company and the more customers they have hosting websites through their platform, the longer it can take to investigate a site that’s been reported.

In the meantime, there are some behaviors that tech users can deploy that will help them avoid some of these sites…

1. Never click a link in an email, text message, or social media message unless you’ve verified it with the sender; don’t just trust that you know the sender, either, since accounts can be hacked or copycatted.

2. Avoid clicking on ads in social media posts unless you can explicitly trust the company and the link. When in doubt, simply do a quick internet search for the product and the seller in order to look at the item more closely.

3. Most important of all, make sure you have a reputable security suite installed and updated. Antivirus software isn’t enough anymore, not with so many different threats out there. A lot of great software developers even offer their products at “freemium” pricing, which means there’s a price plan for every budget. There’s literally no excuse to not protect your tech.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Read next: Getting the Most Out of Your Antivirus

February 5th is Safer Internet Day, an international effort aimed at making our world wide web safer for every kind of user.

This year’s theme, “Together for a better internet”, focuses on creating a better internet for all users.

 

Whether it’s children playing a game or doing homework, longtime friends reconnecting over social media, or a company conducting business around the world, the internet was designed to bring people together. Ideally, it should happen without becoming the victim of a crime.

 

The Safer Internet Day website contains a wealth of resources and announcements about events in different locations, but you don’t have to save it all for one special day. There are a number of things you can do to make the internet a better place.

1. Embrace strong password security

A lot of people misunderstand the mechanism by which hackers grab your password. They think teams of criminals sit at workstations and type in various numbers or letters until they get it right. That’s why a lot of people think using something like “password” is a good idea: “They’ll never guess something so obvious!” The truth is, hackers use software that can make billions of guesses per second. They don’t have to type a thing, they just launch the software and wait for access to your account.

But you can fight back against this by using a password that even a computer would have a hard time guessing. Combinations of uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols are important for protecting your accounts, as is ensuring that you only use that password on one account.

2. Beware of what you share

Social media hoaxes are nothing new, but they continue to run rampant because people blindly click to send them out again. A lot of hoaxes may be silly stories or “click like and share if you want this baby to be healed!” kinds of pointless content. However, there’s a reason accounts like those post fake content.

Even if it looks like they’re not benefitting in any way, they still are. When you share someone’s post, you’re telling the social media platform that this is valuable content. That means the algorithms behind it are more likely to make other content from that user visible to a lot of people.

Of course, silly hoaxes are one thing, but posting negative information is something else altogether. Make sure you’re not accidentally sharing inaccurate medical information, content that willfully targets an individual, or posts that damage reputations despite being false.

3. Even if it’s about yourself, don’t overshare

Oversharing on social media doesn’t just mean spilling the beans about family secrets or uploading embarrassing potty training videos of your kids. It also means posting so much information about you or your family that an identity thief can connect the dots. Even worse, you could accidentally post so much information that this same thief can connect the data dots on your friends and relatives.

Remember to maintain an air of caution about what you put in your profiles, what you say in your posts, and which friend requests you accept in order to avoid being targeted by someone masquerading as something they’re not.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Read more: Hackers Use Memes To Hide Malicious Code

Fans of the iPhone video chat feature FaceTime might be surprised to learn that a software bug may have been leaking their private calls. While the process took a number of steps to initiate—so it’s unlikely anyone accidentally eavesdropped, but instead chose to do so intentionally—there was also no way to know if someone was listening to you during your calls.

To make the glitch work in their favor, a user had to initiate a FaceTime call and then add their own phone number as another person in the group call. That way, even if the actual third-party never answered, the call remained connected and the user could listen in on the other person. Even worse, if the unaware third-party pressed their volume button or power button for some reason, the eavesdropping became a video monitoring call instead of just audio.

This kind of privacy flaw isn’t like Apple, a company known for its consumer-centric security. Several industry watchers like 9to5Mac and the Verge have reported on this bug, and Apple has temporarily disabled all group FaceTime function until a patch can be written and a software update released.

First, the immediate warning for consumers: situations like this one are why you must make it a priority to download new software updates when they become available. When companies release an update, it’s because they’ve found ways to make their product better. Many times, the update can actually resolve a serious security or privacy problem.

More importantly, this is a stark reminder that our technology is only as good as the level of human error behind it. Apple prides itself on producing great products and focusing on its users’ needs, but even the best can sometimes experience flaws. If you don’t put blind trust in your products or platforms, you’ll be less likely to feel the harmful effects of accidental issues.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Read next: Spring Cleaning for Your Mobile Device

Memes are a fun way to spread a little light-hearted internet discussion using pictures that have been overlaid with bold-font text. Some memes are based on screenshots from iconic movies, and others take on a viral life of their own after a simple photograph is uploaded and altered with a message. However, it’s okay to be a bit of a grumpy cat when it comes to protecting your identity.

Hackers have been able to use a process called steganography to hide malicious code in the string of computer code that makes up a meme. Steganography is basically “information hiding inside information.” Be aware, though, that steganography as a tool is not always harmful or malicious, it’s only how it’s used that can cause problems. It’s like the parent of a toddler hiding pureed carrots in their child’s spaghetti sauce, just to get a few more veggies into them; instead, it’s hackers hiding harmful malware inside a picture that looks funny.

Even worse, that funny picture is easily shareable in emails, messages, and on social media. You can potentially infect your entire contact list with one affected meme.

Fortunately, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself and your online friends. Many of these preventive measures are just good internet habits to develop anyway, so there’s really nothing too difficult to master.

  • First, avoid opening links or attachments in emails or messages. Many different types of malware can be lurking in a link to an infected page or in the macros of an attached document, so you should never open these unless you’ve personally verified it with the sender.
  • If someone sends you a funny or poignant meme, don’t “open” it by tapping on it (on a mobile device) or saving it to your computer. Have a good laugh, then forget it.
  • Never share a meme unless you can trust the source. If someone sent you one and you saved it to your computer then uploaded it to your Facebook wall, for example, you’re potentially infecting anyone who clicks on it through your social media channels. If anyone shares your post to their own wall, they may be spreading it far and wide.
  • Most important of all, make sure that you have strong, up-to-date, reliable antivirus software installed on your computer. Depending on the company you choose, some very affordable security suites offer tools like anti-ransomware, anti-phishing, and instant scanning of new files even before you open them. That means any new content coming across your internet connection is checked out—and blocked, if necessary—before it reaches your hard drive.

Again, all of these steps are good ideas to put into practice anyway, even if you’re not sending or receiving memes. Protect your network, your devices, and your identifying information by adopting good internet security habits.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Read next: What Can a Thief Do With Your Driver’s License?

Fortnite is a popular online battle game that has drawn criticism for its combination of violent battle and seemingly child-friendly artwork, as well as for its business model that encourages players to spend real money on fake goods within the game. Worse, though, is the recent announcement that a bug in the game’s code allowed hackers to access players’ accounts and use their stored credit cards.

Pending the ongoing investigation, Epic Games hasn’t revealed how many Fortnite accounts were compromised, so until notification is sent to all affected players, it’s a good idea to check your payment card statements regularly and change your password.

There has been some concern raised about hackers’ ability to also intervene on voice chat sessions between players—which is alarming since this game is used mainly by kids—but the company says that is not true.

The hackers didn’t gain access to the credit card information, so how did they benefit from this? There is a whole world of internet buying and selling that involves virtual goods sold within games. If you’ve seen the recent children’s animated film, Wreck It Ralph 2: Ralph Breaks the Internet, this acquisition of useful items is portrayed. People working within a game acquire items that help players get to another level—like a special tool, a faster car, or better weapons—and sell them for actual money online by transferring them to the buyer’s account within the game. It’s perfectly legal and allowable, but hacking someone’s account and using their credit card to purchase these things is not.

Epic Games claims the bug has now been closed, but again, changing your password is a good idea. At the same time, despite official announcements to the contrary, this is an excellent time to talk to your kids about connecting with other players in online games. Whether or not the hackers could eavesdrop on conversations doesn’t matter; the other people legitimately participating in those conversations might easily be bad actors, as well. Talk to your online game players about safe conversations, never divulging their personal details, and understanding how virtual items cost very real money.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Read next: What Can a Thief Do With Your Driver’s License?

Ah, another year has passed and we’re ready to jump into the future of 2019. First, let’s take a look back at our predictions from 2018 that came true. We discussed the potential of AI to stop hacking, scammer’s new techniques to take advantage of social media users and transparency in IoT devices.  Of course with the emergence of technology and cybercriminals evolving their techniques, unanticipated challenges have arisen.

2019’s focus will be on data: Data breaches, data abuses, data privacy.  Even though ITRC is first and foremost a victim service and consumer education organization, we know that the thieves need our data in order to perpetrate their fraud and identity theft.

Data breaches: Consumers will gain more clarity (about how a specific breach actually effects them.  Breached entities will be pushed to be more transparent and less vague about the specifics of the type of data that has been breached.  Vague terms such as “and other data” or “client records”, that appear on data breach notification letter currently will no longer be tolerated by breach victims. Thieves are always looking to get their hands on our data and with a little technique called “credential cracking,” we think we’re going to be seeing more security notifications, not just breach notifications in 2019. Here’s what’s going on: following a large-scale data breach, and in order to gain access to your online accounts, a hacker simply uses a large database of usernames and allows the computer to “guess” the passwords for each account they are attempting to log into. We’re beginning to see companies send security notifications to their customers that their username/email credentials are being used – possibly by an unauthorized user – to login to their platform even if there is no account (i.e. Warby Parker & Dunkin Donuts).

Data Abuses: The public will gain more insights into data abuses, not just breaches.  More incidents, like the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica event will come to light.  As we as consumers demand more transparency, and as regulators probe deeper, the ongoing act of using our data for other than the purpose for which we have given consent will come out of the shadows.  Consumers will also start paying more attention to the notifications they receive from businesses that say their information was shared with third parties and what that means for them.

Data Privacy:  Consumer empowerment around privacy and data privacy is top of mind in a way that it has never been before.  Other states will follow California’s lead and pass their own data privacy legislation in the hopes of empowering consumers and keeping industry in check. Especially seeing as California, Florida, Texas, New York and Pennsylvania (in that order) had the highest numbers of cybercrime reports last year.  This will likely not provide the much needed long term solution, or the necessary cultural shift.  Just look at the condition of the state by state data breach notification laws, and the years-long discussion (that’s at a stalemate by the way) of a more universal regulation and process.  Will we start that cycle over again here?  Probably. Until the public has a concrete understanding of the complex relationship between data creators (consumers), data owners (the platform on which the data was created, generally) and data users (every industry currently operating in the US) these statewide measures will fall short of making any real headway into actually giving us more control over our data or more privacy.

Even though it has been discussed for over 13 years, there is a good chance that 2019 will be the year that a federal data breach notification law will become a reality.  Of course, predictions are just an educated guess based on previous events and information. Industry, policymakers and the public alike will have to wait and see how 2019 will be impacted by identity theft, cybercrime, hacking and data breaches. One thing we can be sure of though is that the ITRC will be here, working to fight back against the latest techniques to commit identity theft and scams.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


Read next: The 2018 Impact of Data Breaches and Cybercrime

Better than any Oscar nominations or National Basketball Association (NBA) rankings, there’s a different kind list that keeps cybersecurity experts and consumer advocates on the edge of their seats each year. This list, compiled from actual, intentional user mistakes, ranks the worst—make that “least secure”—passwords by how frequently they’re used.

Note: Why do far too many consumers continue to use ridiculously weak passwords? Because of a misunderstanding of how passwords are “guessed” by hackers. Despite what people might think, no one sits at a computer and types in one attempt after another. Instead, they deploy software that is capable of “guessing” random words, phrases and character combinations at literally billions of guesses per second.

(As one tech user said to the Identity Theft Resource Center when justifying the use of “password” as his online banking password, “It’s so easy no one would think to guess that one.” Unfortunately, that’s not how this works.)

This year’s list of worst passwords not only includes some that have been haunting the security industry for years, it also includes a few newcomers.

Taking the number one spot once again was “123456.” Interestingly, after the #2 spot went to “password,” the remaining top seven most commonly used passwords were the number variations “1234566789,” “12345678,” “12345,” “111111,” and “1234567.”

There were some odd choices this year, as the #8 spot went to “sunshine” and #10 was “iloveyou.” Number 9 was no surprise, unfortunately, as the ever-popular “qwerty” landed there.

“Admin” and “football” made the list again this year, as did “123123.” A shockingly high number of tech users thought they could beat the bots by holding down the shift key while hitting those number keys, which means “!@#$%^&*” was the 20th most commonly used password this year. Not to be outdone by the qwerty fans, a few more people tried to outwit the hackers by running their passwords straight up the bottom row of keys: “zxcvbnm” took spot #26.

People’s first names were surprisingly common passwords. Jordan, Joshua, George, Harley, Summer, Thomas, Buster, Hannah, Daniel and more were all in the top fifty.

The complete list of 100 most commonly used passwords is available by clicking here, but remember—it’s a guide of what not to do, not a list of passwords that are so simple no one would think you’d ever use them. So what kind of password should you use?

A strong, unique password is one that you only use on one account (not repeating it on multiple accounts), and that contains a long, virtually unguessable combination of letters, numbers, and symbols. Eight characters is typically considered the bare minimum for security but the longer the password, the harder it is for hacking software to guess it. While you’re creating this hopefully-foolproof password, remember to avoid common words, phrases, variations on your name, or the name of the website where the account was created.

So how are you supposed to remember a really long, secure password and make a separate one for each account? You could use a widely-respected password manager software, but there’s always a risk of those companies’ servers being hacked. If you’re really struggling to protect yourself, you can come up with your own cheat.

For example, pick a song or a book title that you will always remember, such as, “These Boots Were Made for Walking.” Now, pick a long number combination, like your childhood phone number. You can weave together the first letter of each word in the title (alternating uppercase and lowercase) and each digit in the phone number so that you end up with something that looks like “?T2b5W6m1F9w67!” Note the extra symbols at the beginning and end.

This fairly strong password is only good for one of your accounts, though. So here are a couple of things to try:

1. You can also weave in the name of the website, like PayPal or Amazon, by putting one of the letters at the beginning and one of the letters at the end. That way, you only have to remember two letters for each account and your strong password in the middle. This is NOT ideal from a security standpoint, but it’s far better than reusing your dog’s name on every account you own.

2. Use your very strong password for your email and simply click “forgot my password” every time you log into a different sensitive account. You’ll get an email to change your password on that site, and you can change it to anything you like—even just mashing keys on your keyboard—since you’re going to change it again the next time you log in.

There’s something else to consider about password security. Changing your passwords from time to time is important for keeping hackers out of your accounts. The ability to steal or purchase databases of old login credentials means someone could get your current password by stealing information that’s several years old. Protect yourself with regular updates to your password.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


Read next: The 2018 Impact of Data Breaches and Cybercrime

Year after year, cybercrimes like scams, fraud, identity theft and data breaches make a global impact on consumers and businesses alike. Organizations like the Federal Trade Commission and the Identity Theft Resource Center keep tabs on the statistics and the aftermath of these events in order to form a clearer picture of their effects. With only days to go until we reach the end of 2018, here’s a look at some of the numbers from this year.

Top Scams of the Year

According to a report by Heimdal Security, phishing attempts continue to be one of the more prevalent ways scammers connect with their victims. Phishing usually arrives as an email that entices someone to take action; the action might be to send money, hand over sensitive data, redirect to a harmful website, or even download a virus from a macro contained within the email. No matter what the story the scammers use, one-third of all security incidents last year began with a phishing email.

What happens to consumers when they fall for a phishing email? One in five people reported losing money, around $328 million altogether. That’s about $500 per victim on average, but that’s also only from the victims who reported the scam. Interestingly, new data this year found that Millennials were more likely to fall for a scam than senior citizens, although seniors still lost more money on average than these younger victims.

Different Industries Impacted by Data Breaches

The ITRC’s annual Data Breach Report highlights the organizations that have been impacted by data breaches throughout the year, along with the number of consumer records that were compromised. While the year isn’t over, the data compiled through Nov. 30 is already worrisome.

There have been more than 1,100 data breaches through the end of November 2018, and more than 561 million consumer records compromised. Those breaches were categorized according to the type of industry the victim organization falls under: banking/credit/financial, business, education, government/military and medical/healthcare.

The business sector saw not only the highest number of breaches but also the highest number of compromised records with 524 breaches and 531,987,008 records. While the medical and healthcare industry had the second highest number of breaches at 334 separate events, the government/military’s 90 breaches totaled more compromised records at 18,148,442. The financial sector only had 122 data breaches this year, but those events accounted for more than 1.7 million compromised records. Finally, while education—from pre-K through higher ed—only reported 68 data breaches, there were nearly one million compromised records associated with schools and institutions.

The Crimes that Made Headlines

There were quite a few headline-grabbing security incidents this year. While Facebook and the Cambridge Analytica events were not classified as traditional data breaches, they were nonetheless an eye opener for social media users who value their privacy. The Marriott International announcement of a 383 million-guest breach of its Starwood Hotels brand has opened consumers’ eyes about the types of information that hackers can steal, in this case, 5 million unencrypted passport numbers. The breach of the government’s online payment portal at GovPayNow.com affected another 14 million users, demonstrating that even the most security-driven organizations can have vulnerabilities. Finally, separate incidents at retailers and restaurants like Hudson Bay and Jason’s Deli reminded us (and those breaches’ combined 8.4 million victims) that attacking point-of-sale systems to steal payment card information is still a very viable threat.

What Do Criminals Really Steal?

In every scam, fraud, and data breach, criminals are targeting some kind of end goal. Typically, it’s money, identifying information or both. But recent breaches this year of websites like Quora—which provides login services for numerous platforms’ comment forums—also show that sometimes login credentials can be just as useful.

After all, with the high number of tech users who still reuse their passwords on numerous online accounts, stealing a database of passwords to a fairly innocuous site could result in account access to so-called bigger fish, like email, online banking, major retail websites, and more. Furthermore, it showed that a lot of users establish accounts or link those accounts to their Facebook or Gmail logins without really following up; a lot of people who learned their information was stolen in the Quora breach may have forgotten they even had accounts in the first place. The number of victims in that breach is expected to be over 100 million.

Moving Forward into the New Year

The biggest security events of 2018 may pale in comparison to criminal activity next year. After all, there was a time when the Black Friday 2013 data breach of Target’s POS system was considered shocking. One thing that cybercriminals have taught us time and time again is that there’s money to be made from their activities, and they aren’t going to give up any time soon.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


Read next: “Honeyboys Keeping Internet Users Safe”

The term “honeypot” is actually an old word with a lot of different connotations. Besides the obvious container for honey, it also refers to any kind of “lure,” whether it’s an attractive person, a lucrative business deal or even a criminal’s bait to snare a victim.

The tech sector has long been flipping the script on honeypots and using them to lure the criminals. Whether it’s an unsecured cache of sensitive information, a website that purposely contains vulnerabilities or some other cyberbait, the result is the honeypot can help security researchers track down cybercriminals and grab their identifying information.

Now, researchers at one university have taken the crime-fighting a step further with the invention of the HoneyBot. This robotic security guard doesn’t patrol the hallways of a building to keep an eye out for intruders, though. Instead, it serves as a connected device that hackers would want to go after, a kind of data honeypot on wheels.

You might already be wondering, “Why does a data trap need to move around?” It’s so simple that it’s genius. One of the ways hackers know they’ve hit on useful data and not a trap is by having the ability to interact with the secret honeypot in a very sophisticated, higher-level way. If there’s nothing really interactive about it, then it could actually warn away cybercriminals. Worse, it could give them a portal to infiltrate a network (the opposite function of a honeypot).

When they’re able to interact with the HoneyBot and send it around the building, they’ll think they’re actually on to something. This makes the robot ideal for factories, manufacturing plants, and even a large-scale infrastructure like a power grid. While the hackers are toying around with the robot and trying to get access to other parts of the network, the HoneyBot is scooping up all of their information and reporting it to the cybersecurity team.

University researchers are expected to share the results of extensive testing in the near future, but this kind of innovation is already an exciting new tool for fighting back against cybercrime.


Read next: “Block the Wi-Fi Nabbers”