Malicious actors have a number of different approaches when trying to breach a company’s website or security defenses. In a recently announced data breach, the socially-conscious sock donation company Bombas alerted its customers to a formjacking attack which appears to have compromised customers’ names, addresses and payment card information. This is the second Bombas data breach reported, following a separate incident of the same nature that the company discovered in November 2014.

Bombas operates under the model of “buy one, give one.” For every pair of the company’s socks that are purchased, Bombas donates another pair to homeless shelters. This model has made the company popular with consumers who enjoy not only the company’s quality, but also their give-back business model.

formjacking attack occurs when hackers intentionally insert malicious JavaScript into a website. Once the new section of code is in place and operating, the hackers are given the information that a customer types into the website’s form. When customers entered their buyer information to complete a transaction on Bombas’ website, the hackers also received that information unbeknownst to the customer, while the transactions were completed normally.

Fortunately, scheduled updates to the Bombas website on February 16, 2017, rendered the formjacking code useless. However, the company’s investigation shows it may have been inserted as early as November 11, 2016. As such, Bombas is offering free credit monitoring to its customers. Anyone who may have made purchases between those identified dates is also encouraged to take further steps to reduce their risk of falling victim to identity theft due to the Bombas data breach.

Customers who made purchases between November 11, 2016, and February 16, 2017, should consider freezing their credit reports with the three credit reporting agencies, TransUnion, Experian and Equifax. They may also opt to view a free credit report from each of those agencies through AnnualCreditReport.com to look for any unusual activity. All consumers, especially those who may have been impacted by any type of data breach or data leak, should routinely monitor their financial statements and report any suspicious findings to the Federal Trade Commission.

Victims of the Bombas data breach can live-chat with an Identity Theft Resource Center expert advisor via the agency’s website or by calling toll-free at 888.400.5530. Advisors can help victims create an action plan that is tailored to their specific situation. Victims can also download the free ID Theft Help App for iOS and Android to access a case log tool for tracking their steps, free resources, advisors and much more.


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Watch out for 2020 Summer Scams

Credit Reporting Agencies Announce Free Credit Reports Every Week Through 2021

Dark Web Data Breach Leads to Thieves Stealing from Thieves

Since 2005, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has built one of the most comprehensive repositories of publicly reported data breach information in the U.S. that is updated daily. In the last 15 years, the ITRC has tracked over 10,000 breaches

Data breaches target different companies and sectors using a variety of attack vectors (the way threat actors commit an attack). Most recently, it was a group of hackers that stole a database of information from another group of cyber criminals as part of a dark web data breach. Hacker KingNull recently leaked the database of Daniel’s Hosting (DH), the largest free web hosting provider on the dark web. 

The information leaked in the dark web data breach was obtained in March 2020 when a hacker breached the DH portal, stole the database and wiped the servers of close to 7,600 websites, a third of all dark web portals.

The dark web data breach was confirmed by ZDNet and included over 3,500 email addresses, 7,000 account passwords and 8,500 private keys for .onion domains used on the dark web. Some security researchers say the breached data from the dark web data breach could be used to link owners of the leaked email addresses to some dark web portals to help law enforcement track those who might be running or taking part in illegal activities on the dark web.

Another recent data breach the ITRC has tracked involves LiveJournal, a blogging and diary website. Cybersecurity researchers believe the platform was breached in 2014, ordinarily requiring a data breach notification to users. However, LiveJournal owner, the Rambler Group, says the breach never happened. In fact, they believe the usernames and passwords were collected from various other malware and brute-force attacks.

However, the database, which contains credentials for over 26 million LiveJournal accounts, has been leaked online and is being sold on the dark web and in hacker forums. Exposed information includes email addresses, passwords and usernames for members of the blogging service. The LiveJournal data breach illustrates how patient data thieves can be; holding onto data for years before using or selling it. This is a common trait seen among hackers that helps increase the value of stolen data and reduce the chances of getting caught.

Finally, IllinoisArkansasColoradoOhioFlorida, and most recently, Kentucky all suffered unemployment department data exposures due to their quick response in setting up convenient, DIY websites for those seeking unemployment benefits due to closures from the coronavirus. Some of the states’ identified a common vendor as the source of the glitch, and all states believe they were able to fix the problem within hours of being notified. Fortunately, none of the six states have found any evidence of a cyberattack or any personal information being stolen. However, the affected states notified applicants and offered free credit monitoring to help spot any unusual activity, which could be a sign of identity theft.

The recent unemployment data exposures are a good example of how not all data compromises are the same. While some news headlines referred to these incidents as data breaches, they are not actually breaches because the information was never downloaded from the computer system where the information was stored.

This is considered to be a case of data exposure because the personal information of applicants could be viewed by other applicants if they knew where to look because of a software error that was corrected before cybercriminals could find the flaw. Only if someone viewed the information and then attempted to misuse someone’s identity, would the event turn into a data breach – a very rare event in the privacy and security world.

A data breach is far more serious than a data exposure. A data breach is when information is intentionally removed, usually to commit an identity crime. Mass data breaches are typically committed by well-organized groups that can exploit software flaws, stolen login credentials or trick an employee into doing something that allows attackers to access a company’s information.

If someone believes they had their information exposed as part of a data breach or is a victim of identity theft due to a data breach, they can live-chat with an ITRC expert advisor. They can also call toll-free at 888.400.5530. Advisors can help victims create action plans tailored to them. Victims can also download the ID Theft Help App. The app lets them track their case in a case log, access resources and tips to help them protect their identity and more.

Join us on our weekly data breach podcast to get the latest perspectives on the last week in breaches. Subscribe to get it delivered on your preferred podcast platform.


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AERIES DATA BREACH AFFECTS SCHOOL DISTRICTS ACROSS CALIFORNIA

PURPORTED LIVEJOURNAL DATA BREACH LEADS TO 26 MILLION USER RECORDS BEING STOLEN

FORMJACKING TACTICS USED IN FABFITFUN DATA BREACH

As an unusual school year winds down, many parents and students have a new lesson to learn: what to do after the Aeries data breach impacted school districts throughout California. Aeries Software, a student data management system software used by over 600 K-12 public school districts, suffered a data breach after an unidentified and unauthorized person accessed an unknown amount of parent and student data.

According to the Notice of Data Breach that was sent to those affected by the data breach, Aeries became aware of unauthorized attempts to access information through the Aeries SIS. Security patches were deployed in December 2019. However, in January 2020, the software developer was notified that the database was previously accessed. In March 2020, it was determined that student and parent information had been accessed, including login information, physical addresses, emails and password hashes.

While it is unknown how many of the 600+ school districts have been affected, some of the districts that have submitted notification letters to the California Attorney General’s Office include Inglewood Unified School District, Lassen Union High School District, Kingsburg Elementary Charter School District, Laguna Beach Unified School District, Central School District, Rocklin Unified School District, Yucaipa-Calimesa Joint Unified School District, San Bernardino City Unified School District, Los Alamitos Unified School District, Monrovia Unified School District and Santa Barbara Unified School District.

Despite access to a limited dataset, if hackers manage to infiltrate any of the email accounts, they could potentially target other types of accounts like financial accounts, social media accounts and retail accounts that are linked to the email address. With email account information, hackers could also target victims with spam emails, phishing attempts and harmful software viruses.

While child identity theft most commonly occurs due to stolen Social Security numbers, which are believed to have not been exposed in the Aeries data breach, it is still important for parents and students to reset their passwords as soon as possible – as well as any other places that they may have used that same password. Parents and students are encouraged to make a change from passwords to passphrases that are nine to ten characters long. Passphrases are easier to remember and harder for hackers to break.

 

As of July 16, 2020, school districts impacted include: Inglewood Unified School District, Lassen Union High School District, Kingsburg Elementary Charter School District, Laguna Beach Unified School District, Central School District, Rocklin Unified School District, Yucaipa-Calimesa Joint Unified School District, San Bernardino City Unified School District, Los Alamitos Unified School District, La Habra City School District, Saddleback Valley Unified School District, El Dorado County Office of Education, Chino Valley Unified School District, Evergreen Union School District, Apple Valley Unified School District, San Leandro Unified School District, Yuba City Unified School District, Travis Unified School District, Washington Unified School District, Corning Union High School District, Lowell Joint School District, Tulare Joint Union High School District, Monrovia Unified School District, Santa Barbara Unified School District, Mt. Diablo Unified School District, Brea-Olinda Unified School District, Fairfield-Suisun Unified School District, ABC Unified School District, Beverly Hills Unified School District, Red Bluff Joint Union High School District, Adelanto Elementary School District, Riverdale Joint Unified School District and Santa Clara Unified School District.

If someone affected by the Aeries data breach believes their personal information is being misused, they are encouraged to file an ID Theft Report with the Federal Trade Commission and to contact all three credit reporting agencies to request free credit reports and to place a credit freeze. Affected minors will need a parent or guardian to request a credit report and freeze their credit.

Victims of the Aeries data breach can live-chat with and Identity Theft Resource Center expert advisor or call toll-free at 888.400.5530. They can also download the free ID Theft Help App to create a customized case log to track the activities around resolving their data breach case, have access to advisors, resources and more.


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Purported LiveJournal Data Breach Leads to 26 Million User Records Being Stolen

Formjacking Tactics Used in FabFitFun Data Breach

Arbonne Data Exposure Compromises Thousands of Accounts

In a story that seems to start in 2014, blogging platform LiveJournal appears to have suffered a data breach. The LiveJournal data breach—whose database of users’ names, email addresses and plain-text passwords was supposedly sold and traded on the Dark Web many times over the past six years—has been speculated about by several different entities.

While the LiveJournal data breach may have occurred as early as 2014, some sources can only link the database of 26 million user records with any reasonable certainty to about three years ago. In 2018, rumors of a LiveJournal data breach surfaced once again when users reported being victims of a sextortion campaign. The victims knew where the stolen information had come from because it was involved unique email addresses and password combinations that they had only used on LiveJournal.

Later, the database was discovered making the rounds on the Dark Web as various hackers used or leaked it online. The well-known data breach search site Have I Been Pwned received the LiveJournal database on May 27, 2020, and lists the formal date of the original breach as January 1, 2017. However, that could be the only verifiable time frame for this particular set of user information and not the actual data breach event date.

The LiveJournal database appears to have been posted for sale online and traded privately between hackers using it for credential stuffing attacks. In that form of attack, fraudsters gain access to usernames and passwords and try those combinations on numerous other sites. If any LiveJournal users reused their username and password on another site, the hackers – or anyone who purchased the database – would have access to those accounts as well.

With that said, not everyone who buys a database of this kind intends to steal account access. Other malicious actors use these records for spam email campaigns, phishing attacks, ransomware attacks and other harmful tactics.

Credential stuffing is a major problem in information security. With so many data breaches and compromised consumer records, reusing a password is essentially the same as failing to secure an account. For some time, security experts have recommended changing to an easy to remember, but difficult to attack, passphrase instead of the old eight-character passwords.

For its part, LiveJournal’s owner, Rambler Group, has not confirmed that a LiveJournal data breach ever occurred, despite the users’ information available online. The company claims that this database and the connection to hacking involving its other platform DreamWidth are merely coincidental and that the database of LiveJournal or DreamWidth users’ login credentials was simply gleaned through unrelated breaches or malware attacks on users’ computers and then compiled into one file. This is despite the fact that ads offering the LiveJournal database for sale are still posted online.

If someone believes they might have been impacted by a potential LiveJournal data breach, they can live-chat with an Identity Theft Resource Center expert advisor. They can also call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530. Finally, they can download the free ID Theft Help App for iOS or Android to communicate with advisors via live chat, use the case management tool to track their action for resolving their data breach case, find resources for protecting themselves from further harm and much more.


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Formjacking Tactics Used in FabFitFun Data Breach

Arbonne Data Exposure Compromises Thousands of Accounts

Consumers Should Watch Out for COVID-19 Job Reopening Scams

Some members of FabFitFun are trying to figure out the next steps for them to take following a FabFitFun data breach. FabFitFun, a company that allows consumers to become members and get customized boxes mailed to them with products, suffered a data breach as the result of formjacking, where a thief inserts a code that gathers credit card information and, in some cases, more personal information in the background while the transaction processes like normal.

According to the Office of the Vermont Attorney General, the FabFitFun technical team discovered illegally placed malicious code on the company’s website. The breach notification letter states the malicious code was placed on the “Shop” portion of the website on May 2 and taken down on May 6. FabFitFun says the data breach did not impact the “Add-Ons” and “Box Purchases” portions of the website.

Members who completed purchases between May 2 and May 6 may have had personal information exposed during the FabFitFun data breach, including names, addresses, cities, states, zip codes, phone numbers, email addresses, credit card numbers, CVV codes and card expiration dates. If members were in the process of checking out but did not complete a purchase between May 2 and May 6, they could have had their names, addresses, cities, states, zip codes, phone numbers and email addresses exposed. Fortunately, those members are not believed to have had any credit card information leaked.

After learning of the malicious code, FabFitFun took down the code and offered affected members an annual membership. Anyone who’s information was exposed in the FabFitFun data breach should contact their credit card or debit card provider and follow their recommendations. Members should monitor their credit card or debit card statements for any suspicious activity and report anything suspicious to the bank listed on the card. For fraudulent charges, members should file an ID Theft Report with the Federal Trade Commission and obtain a copy for their records in case it needs to be used with a creditor to clear fraudulent charges.

Members affected by the FabFitFun data breach can also live-chat with an Identity Theft Resource Center expert advisor, or call toll-free at 888.400.5530. They can also download the free ID Theft Help App, where they can create a customized log to track all their steps in resolving their data breach case, access ITRC advisors for a personalized action plan, resources and much more.


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Arbonne Data Exposure Compromises Thousands of Accounts

Consumers Should Watch Out for COVID-19 Job Reopening Scams

ShinyHunters Hacks Expose Business Vulnerabilities

Arbonne International, LLC, a worldwide skin care and health product company that operates as a multi-level marketing business model, announced that it had discovered a data compromise of its computer system. After noticing some unusual, unauthorized activity on its network, Arbonne hired a third-party security company to investigate the scope of the Arbonne data exposure.

While their findings are still incomplete, they did discover that an unknown entity gained access to certain aspects of the computerized system. No highly-sensitive information like Social Security numbers was compromised and no payment card information was accessed. However, to be safe, Arbonne forced a password reset of its affected users’ accounts and filed a notification with the proper authorities. The company also issued data breach event notification letters for the Arbonne data exposure and is offering one year of identity monitoring to affected users in compliance with state laws.

While Arbonne continues to sort out how the data exposure happened and what the extent of the compromise may be, it serves as an important reminder to all tech users about the need for good passphrase practices. The passwords of old may not be secure enough anymore and experts recommend a longer “passphrase” that is difficult for malicious actors to guess but easier for the individual user to remember. By establishing passphrases, users may be more likely to make new ones for every account instead of reusing them or changing them by only one letter or digit when a situation like the Arbonne data exposure arises.

Arbonne account holders should monitor their other accounts carefully for the foreseeable future to keep a close watch for any suspicious activity. If they see suspicious activity, they should contact their bank immediately. Victims of the Arbonne data exposure can also live-chat with an Identity Theft Resource Center advisor or call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530. Victims can also download the free ID Theft Help App for iOS or Android, which allows victims to track their steps in a case management tool, live-chat with an advisor, access resources and much more.


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ShinyHunters Hacks Expose Business Vulnerabilities

College Student Stimulus Check Scams Begin to Heat Up

Since 2005, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has been tracking publicly notified breaches, building one of the most comprehensive repositories of data in the U.S. that is updated daily.

One of the most recent cybercrimes the ITRC reported involves a cybercrime ring, ShinyHunters, stealing the information of over 200 million customers from at least 13 different companies. In early May, ShinyHunters posted 15 million customer records on the dark web. Two days later, the hacking group began offering the entire database to buyers, which included 91 million user accounts from an Indonesian website.

Since then, ShinyHunters has offered more than 100 million users’ account information at popular websites like dating app Zoosk, meal kit company Home Chef, design-focused marketplace Minted, Minnesota’s Star Tribune newspaper, health and wellness website Mindful, photo printing service Chatbooks and online publication Chronicle of Higher Education.

While not all of those companies acknowledged ShinyHunters’ claims, more are recognizing the data breaches once they confirm there was data theft. One of the latest companies to confirm a data breach was Mathway, a popular education app for iPhone and Android devices. It is believed that the information stolen includes data about children who are the primary users of the app. The Mathway data has proven to be worth a lot on the dark web, going for $4,000 in bitcoin (or over $375 million U.S.) for 25 million stolen user accounts.

ShinyHunters has acknowledged its successful hacks. In fact, in an interview with WIRED magazine, a spokes-hacker said “it is not too hard” to breach so many organizations. They continued to say that “it’s just a way to make money.”

Groups that commit wholesale data theft are not amateurs like one might see in a TV show or a movie. These groups are professional threat actors that run their groups like any business. They have advertising campaigns, marketing campaigns, help desks and customer support – all to steal people’s information and convert it into cash.

Two other recent data breaches the ITRC has noted were of PaperlessPay, a third-party provider for personal information like W-2’s and paystubs, and Wishbone, a social media app that lets users compare products and then interact with other app users to find out what products are hot and what are not.

In February, federal law enforcement investigators found identity thieves selling PaperlessPay client data. The personal information compromised included the names, addresses, pay and withholdings, Social Security numbers and bank account numbers, in some cases.

In regards to Wishbone, hackers are selling 40 million account profiles, which includes names, email addresses, phone numbers, locations, genders, social media profiles and hashed accounts passwords of users. While hashed passwords are typically useless because the information is encrypted and has to be unlocked, Wishbone uses an outdated form of encryption that is easily cracked with a password breaking tool. This is the most recent breach for Wishbone that was also successfully attacked in 2017.

Businesses must keep their cybersecurity and data protection up-to-date. If not, it can lead to data breaches and a loss of revenue from customers who might not trust the business with their personal information. It is also important for consumers to make sure their apps, websites and businesses they share data with have strong security to protect their information. Consumers are encouraged to ask questions before sharing personal information so they can take their business to a company that takes data protection and privacy seriously.

If someone believes they have had their information exposed as part of a data breach, or is a victim of identity theft due to a data breach, they can live-chat with an ITRC expert advisor. They can also call toll-free at 888.400.5530. Advisors can help victims create action plans that are tailored to them. Victims can also download the ID Theft Help App. The app lets them track their case in a case log, access resources and tips to help them protect their identity and more.

Join us on our weekly data breach podcast to get the latest perspectives on the last week in breaches. Subscribe to get it delivered on your preferred podcast platform.


Contact Tracing Scams Ramp Up as New Technology Evolves Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Possible Nigerian Fraud Ring to Blame for Unemployment Identity Theft Attack

Since 2005, the Identity Theft Resource Center has compiled publicly-reported U.S. data breaches as part of our data breach tracking efforts. While our 2019 Data Breach Report revealed an annual 17 percent increase in data breaches compared to 2018, there has since been a data breach decrease reported during the first quarter of 2020, both in the number of incidents and individuals impacted.

In the first quarter of 2020, there were 337 publicly reported breaches and exposures. During the same time period in 2019, 520 data events were reported, which means there have been nearly 185 fewer breaches/exposures reported in 2020. In terms of people impacted, 131 million individuals were affected from January through March of 2020. While that might sound like a lot, 442 million people had their data compromised during that same timeframe in 2019. Overall, the number of data compromises decreased by nearly 35 percent, and the number of people affected by 66 percent in the first three months of 2020. Any decrease in data compromises is a good thing, but it’s important to understand what’s behind the numbers dropping due to the data breach decrease.

The ITRC tracks both publicly reported data breaches and data exposures in a database containing 25 different information fields and 63 different identity attributes that are updated daily. While the ITRC has one of the most comprehensive repositories of data compromises, not all incidents are publicly reported; there can be significant delays between when a breach occurs and is publicly reported. The result of these factors can produce a reduction of publicly reported data events.

There are other reasons why the ITRC’s data could be different from other data breach reports – especially those that are reporting an increase in data compromises in Q1 2020. For example, the ITRC reports the number of records compromised based on the number of individuals impacted, not the number of records stolen or exposed. We believe this methodology gives a more accurate view of the human impact of a data breach or exposure since a single person may have multiple records involved in a single event.

The COVID-19 pandemic could have also played a role in the data breach decrease (particularly in March) as threat actors turned their attention to using the data they already had to launch phishing attacks and COVID-19 scams rather than launching new mass cyberattacks. However, there is no substantive proof of why there was such a drastic decline in the first quarter numbers. With that said, the ITRC believes data breaches could return to a more traditional trendline later in 2020.

If someone believes they have had their information exposed as part of a data breach, or is a victim of identity theft due to a data breach, they can live-chat with an ITRC expert advisor. They can also call toll-free at 888.400.5530. Advisors can help victims create action plans that are tailored to them. Victims can also download the ID Theft Help App. The app lets them track their case in a case log, access resources and tips to help them protect their identity and more.

Join us on our weekly data breach podcast to get the latest perspectives on the last week in breaches. Subscribe to get it delivered on your preferred podcast platform.


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Possible Nigerian Fraud Ring to Blame for Unemployment Identity Theft Attack

Five State Unemployment Department Data Exposures Uncover System Flaws

This blog will be updated as more information becomes available

Reports of accidental exposures and data leaks from six different states’ unemployment websites have some consumers concerned. Illinois, Arkansas, Colorado, Ohio, Florida, and most recently, Kentucky have all suffered recent unemployment department data exposures due to their quick response in setting up convenient, DIY websites for those seeking unemployment benefits due to closures from the coronavirus.

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, or PUA, offers federal assistance to those who are affected by the quarantine. The PUA can be especially helpful as self-employed people, independent contractors and other “gig economy” workers can receive assistance during this time.

In an effort to expedite the submission and processing of these applications, many states have relied on outside vendors to establish their PUA application web portals. Unfortunately, in the rush to help consumers, some of those websites launched before they could be thoroughly quality tested and reviewed for security. The multiple unemployment department data exposures left tens of thousands of users’ complete identities exposed, leading to even more cause for concern.

In each of the six states, the PUA application sites were taken down until they could be secured. Two states, Colorado and Ohio, were notified by Deloitte, their vendor, as to the exposure. One state is already offering credit monitoring to all 72,000 of its PUA recipients, while the others are still investigating and could offer support as their findings unfold.

Also, due to the difficulties surrounding quarantine and employment at this time, the Identity Theft Resource Center has seen cases where workers received notifications that their unemployment application was approved, even though they had not applied for assistance or were still working. However, there is no known link between those cases and the current issues with the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance sites.

All consumers should remain aware of the threat, regardless of their current employment status. If anyone suspects that their personally identifiable information has been exposed or compromised, they are encouraged to place a freeze on their credit reports with the three major credit reporting agencies. They are also encouraged to use anti-virus solutions to secure their devices and protect their online accounts, update their old passwords to a stronger passphrase and make sure none of those passphrases on their personal accounts are also used on their work accounts.

Anyone who has questions or believes they have been affected by an unemployment department data exposure is urged to live-chat with an Identity Theft Resource Center expert advisor. Victims can also call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530. Another tool for victims of a data breach or data exposure is the ID Theft Help App. The app can serve as a “breach activity” case manager for those impacted.


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The Evolution of Password Advice

COVID-19 Could Lead to Increase in Travel Loyalty Account Takeover

Fourteen million Key Ring customers, mostly across North America, may have had their personally identifiable information exposed in a Key Ring data leak that affected the company’s Amazon S3 web storage buckets. The buckets can hold vast databases of information. However, they are not configured as fully secured by default when they are created. Rather, it is the client’s (in this case Key Ring) responsibility to secure their storage buckets.

The Key Ring data leak was discovered in January 2020 by security researchers, Noam Rotem and Ran Locar, from vpnMentor who reached out to both Amazon Web Services and Key Ring with their findings. They confirmed that the databases were secured sometime after February 18 when they first contacted the company.

The purpose of Key Ring, a digital storage app that holds uploaded images of its customers’ loyalty and gift cards, is to make shopping and mobile payments more streamlined by storing images of users’ customer loyalty account cards and gift cards. While Key Ring is not intended to be used to store more sensitive information like driver’s licenses, ID cards and other types of payment cards, some users have used it to save images of these sensitive documents. Affected users’ uploaded card images were unprotected in the Key Ring storage buckets, leading to the accidental Key Ring data leak.

There is no way of knowing whether this information was accessed by malicious actors; the data was discovered by researchers who uncover these unsecured databases to inform the owners. However, if hackers were able to get a hold of the information that was leaked, they could target the customers with spam or phishing attempts, takeover the customers’ accounts, potentially use their payment methods for online shopping and more. Any customer who feels their data may have been compromised from the Key Ring data leak can contact Key Ring for more information about what protection is being offered. Those potentially affected should immediately change the passwords on their loyalty accounts, as well as monitor their bank accounts to look for any suspicious transactions, consider credit monitoring services and a credit freeze, and be on the lookout for phishing emails.

If anyone who believes they have been affected by the Key Ring data leak, they can live-chat with an Identity Theft Resource Center expert advisor or call them toll-free at 888.400.5530. They can also download the ID Theft Help App, which allows victims to track their steps in a customized case log.


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