Thanksgiving, Hanukkah and Christmas are just around the corner. Black Friday, Cyber Monday and holiday shopping is too. It also means the possibility for an increase in identity theft and fraud. So before you get caught up in all the holiday shopping chaos, you should be aware that criminals might use this as an opportunity to compromise your sensitive data. This holiday season, however, one group in particular might be purposely putting themselves at an increased risk of identity theft. A recent survey by Experian found that 19 percent of millennials would put their identity at risk in exchange for a good Cyber Monday deal. While some millennials are making it exceptionally easy to compromise their personal information during the holiday season, let’s take a closer as to why this demographic might be more vulnerable to identity theft year round.

Millennials are notorious for being the most tech-savvy generation, growing up in a world where sharing personal data online and across social media platforms is commonplace. However, their willingness to share personal data easily puts them at an increased risk of identity theft. For one, criminals might have an easier time guessing their security challenge questions because they can be quickly discovered on their public Twitter profile or Instagram page.  Second, since they are so used to sharing a wealth of personal information, they might be less likely to hesitate when asked for it by anyone – including those with malicious intent.

Along with being tech-savvy,  feelings of apathy toward data breaches could be another reason why millennials might be at an increased risk of identity theft.  According to a Gallup poll, 67 percent of millennials are trusting that the companies with which they do business, such as credit card companies and health insurance companies, guard their information. The poll also finds that 70 percent do believe that their privacy will be compromised at some point in time. Because millennials have lived through several major data breaches, they’re aware of the risks but have become accustomed to these types of events and might not fully comprehend the severity of having their personally identifiable information stolen.

In some cases, becoming a victim of identity theft is “fixable,” but what millennials might not understand is that the process is not an easy one. Identity theft cases can take years to remediate. Even if you “fix” the issue, many victims experience reoccurring threats, consistently trying to regain their identity. This also doesn’t take into account the emotional impact victims go through. The Aftermath® study revealed that victims felt angry, frustrated and violated regarding their identity theft situation. In the same survey, 50 percent of victims lost interest in activities they once enjoyed.

And lastly, another reason that millennials might be increasing their risks of identity theft is by thinking it won’t happen to them. According to the AARP, younger generations tend to believe that scammers target the elderly, which allows millennials to believe they are safe. However, what millennials might not realize is that they are just as vulnerable to the threats of identity theft as senior citizens. For example, a recent survey found that 17 percent of millennials were likely to give out sensitive information to a caller that confirmed their last four digits of their Social Security number. So it is, in fact, that everyone is equally just as at risk for identity theft, regardless of their age.

Now more than ever, millennials need to take preventative measures to minimize their risk for identity theft. Here are a couple of tips to help protect your identity:

  • Don’t give out your Social Security number unnecessarily
  • Use strong passwords
  • Set up a passcode/password and anti-virus software on all of your mobile devices (smartphone, tablet) and computers (desktop, laptop)
  • Don’t give out personal information on the phone unless you initiated the contact
  • Avoid logging into sensitive accounts, email or providing credit card/debit card numbers while on public Wi-Fi

If you do find out that your information has been compromised, contact our advisors using our toll-free number (888-400-5530) and they can inform you about the necessary steps to take to resolve the issue. You can also reach us using our live chat feature.

Experian proudly provides financial support to the Identity Theft Resource Center.


Read next: “Your Holiday Shopping Guide to Putting Privacy Under the Tree”

For years, security experts and advocates have warned consumers about suspicious websites, specifically ones that take your sensitive information or payments. The best course of action? To look for the HTTPS designation in the web address at the top of the screen and the little padlock icon, both of which indicate a site can be trusted.

Unfortunately, scammers continue to evolve their ways to continue victimizing the public through technology. A new report has found that about 49% of known phishing websites—websites that steal your information after tricking you into submitting it—contain a secure designation and a little green padlock. The “look for the lock” advice that was once a sound way to protect yourself is a little less reliable than before.

Just as scammers have evolved, now it’s up to consumers to make some changes in order to protect themselves from the latest threats:

1. Install a security suite that offers anti-phishing and website security

A basic antivirus isn’t enough to keep you safe anymore, and a number of well-known security software developers have incorporated a lot of extra features. Some can alert you to a fake website or known scammer before you compromise your information. Even better, many security programs offer a wide range of subscription prices—even free plans—so there’s something to meet every budget.

2. Establish a throwaway email address

Some sites want nothing more than your email address so they can sell it to spammers. Generate a free email address that is separate from your everyday, commonly used one. Then, whenever you’re visiting websites that want your email address, you have the option to trust the site with your contact information or use your backup email address.

3. Designate a payment card for internet purchases

The last thing you need is for a phishing website to steal your money, but it happens. By intentionally having an “internet only” credit card that is not connected to your bank account and that has a very low credit limit, you may have an easier time protecting yourself from someone who steals your information.

The most important thing you can do is to remember that what was once considered top-notch security advice can change as new technology and new developments occur. It’s not enough to develop a good habit and never deviate from it. Instead, you need to stay informed by following ongoing coverage of the latest scams and frauds.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


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If you follow tech news, you may still get shivers up your spine from the buzz surrounding one of the most dangerous ransomware attacks in recent history. The May 2017 WannaCry attack made headlines for months due to the high volume of victims and the high-profile companies who were targeted. Within a short time, this self-replicating cryptoworm had infected more than 300,000 computers, locking up their systems and demanding payment from the victims in the form of Bitcoin.

As with all headlines, though, the story can fade fast when other news takes its place. And just like most other news stories, that doesn’t mean this one is gone just because people aren’t talking about it.

In fact, antivirus and security suite developer Kaspersky Lab issued recent findings that more than 75,000 new cases of WannaCry infections were discovered between July and September of 2018. Yes, only a couple of months ago, new victims were suffering from a well-known form of ransomware and having to decide whether or not to pay the criminals in order to regain access to their computers.

One of the major issues surrounding WannaCry is that a patch was available for it even before the initial attack. Consumers and businesses who were using older computers or older operating systems may have been more vulnerable, along with individuals who haven’t been installing recommended updates regularly.

Another issue some victims faced was not having a strong, up-to-date security suite with antivirus and anti-malware protection. A number of large-scale data breaches have been traced back to inadequate protection for a computer or network, and in some cases, the original victim was not the major corporation who was ultimately the target.

One of the best courses of action against WannaCry or any other form of ransomware is to create scheduled, automatic backups of all your files. These backups can be stored in a cloud-based subscription or an external storage device, and they’ll mean you can still access all of your files if someone targets your system. Paying the ransom might be cheaper than a new computer—the typical WannaCry ransom was $300, but other ransomware attacks have demanded more—but there’s no guarantee the hackers will release your files upon payment. That money can be put towards newer equipment instead of lining a cyberthief’s pockets.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


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The term “data breach” serves as a catch-all word for any kind of event in which someone entrusted with information—usually for large groups of people, like one’s customers or patients—allows that information to be exposed. While some data breaches are the work of highly-skilled hackers who can access a billion email accounts at once, others could be something as simple as an electrician leaving his work phone behind on a job site, possibly exposing customers’ info.

However, no matter how it happened, who was at fault, or what information was exposed, all data breaches are serious. They carry the potential for someone to misuse information or harm others.

A recently reported data breach of the United States Postal System’s website appears to be accidental, but since about 60 million users’ information were exposed for at least a year, there’s no telling what damage could have occurred…or has already occurred.

This breach involves the website’s API, or “application program interface.” API is computer lingo for the set of parameters that help legitimate users interact with a website. The API was connected to the USPS “Informed Visibility Mail Tracking & Reporting” service, a mail tracking preview program, where the weakness was found. Unfortunately, by exploiting any security holes found in the tracking service, hackers can interact with the API, too.

Here’s what security researchers found: the USPS website was accidentally left “unlocked,” meaning anyone with an account could change the search parameters and find other users’ accounts and information. They could even make changes to those accounts in some cases.

Think of it like this example: pretend you went to a major retailer’s website to look up a pair of socks you ordered two years ago. You go to your order history, type in your name and zip code, and then your order history appears. Now pretend that you could simply change the zip code or the last name, or your city or street address. What would you do if all of the information for every person in your zip code, last name, city, or street address appeared? What if it showed you every single item those people had ever ordered?

That’s similar to what happened here, and there are a few unfortunate issues with this breach. First, the information was never secured in the first place. It was only a matter of time before someone decided to test out different data points. Also, the USPS was supposedly informed of this website problem a year ago. Recently, the person who informed them then contacted Krebs on Security to report that the matter had still not been resolved, and Brian Krebs reached out to the postal service. After he contacted them, the USPS patched the problem and made it stop.

This certainly isn’t the first time a government agency has suffered a data breach. The Office of Personnel Management, reported in June 2015, and the US State Department, reported in September 2018, for example, have both endured exposures of users’ sensitive information. However, that doesn’t make the issue any easier for the consumers who now need to monitor their USPS accounts and make sure that nothing out of the ordinary has taken place.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


Read next: “Secret Sisterhood” Online Gift Exchange Scam Alert

This Thanksgiving, there are a lot of important guidelines that consumers should follow for travel safety. You need to arm yourself with the right tools to protect your identity, your financial information, and your holiday spirit this season.

Each year, Thanksgiving—even more than other holidays like Christmas or spring break—has the highest volume of travel traffic. That means crowded airports, last minute flights, and the hunt for hotel accommodations. It can also mean travel scams, fraud, and identity theft if you’re not careful.

Here are a few tips to help keep your information safe and your sense of cheer intact as you travel this holiday season:

1. Online booking – Industry watchers aren’t the only ones who know that more US travelers venture out for turkey day than any other day of the year. Scammers know it, too. If you’re planning on booking air travel, cruises, rental cars, or accommodations online, make sure you’re only using reputable websites. Use a payment method that offers consumer protection just in case, and investigate whether or not you need travel insurance.

2. Last minute specials – Yes, if you do your homework or if your dates are a little flexible, you can find some incredible deals on your travel. You may even find some great last-minute rates on tickets or rooms that haven’t sold. However, you’re just as likely to find some fake websites, harmful links, phony accommodations, and more. Avoid the sense of urgency that scammers often embed in their tactics; if you’re told to “act now” or told there are only “three rooms left!” then you might want to walk away.

3. Know your website – Even if you’re trying to book your trip through a reputable site, you might be the victim of a copycat scam. Everything about the email, social media post, or even the website itself looked legitimate, with the company logo and the right color scheme. But check the web address in the bar at the top of the screen. If you don’t see HTTPS (instead of just HTTP), then you shouldn’t enter any sensitive information. Also, look for characters that could be inserted to trick you, as a zero instead of a letter O or a lowercase L instead if an uppercase I. Those little details can mean you’re on a fake website that will steal your information—and not put you on a plane!

4. Oversharing the event – While you’re away, make sure that you’re not oversharing your personal details on social media. Posting pictures and tagging them with the location could be an indication that your home and mailbox are standing empty. Sharing pictures of other family members and their kids might be a no-no, so make sure you know everyone’s comfort level before you post and label.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


Read next: “Secret Sisterhood” Online Gift Exchange Scam Alert

In the past few years, retailers have seen a trend in how their customers shopped for the holidays. More and more people have grown weary of standing in the cold or elbowing through thousands of shoppers to buy this year’s hot toy. Savvy shoppers have increasingly opted to stay home in their pajamas and find great deals online.

That’s led to the rise in Cyber Monday. Once the holiday chaos of Black Friday is out of the way, the following Monday is a time to pop over to the internet and see what sales are taking place to finish (or start!) your shopping.

Unfortunately, just like Black Friday, Cyber Monday is a favorite holiday for identity thieves, scammers and hackers. In order to reduce your risk of falling victim to the crime, you have to take some steps to secure your identity.

1. Know your antivirus software – Antivirus software has come a long way since the early days of trying to block malicious computer threats. Unfortunately, so have the tools that cybercriminals use to steal your money, your identity, your computer and more. A comprehensive security suite can now offer you protection from ransomware, trojans, worms, phishing scams, keyloggers and so much more. Many of them now include parental control tools, which is great if you have kids, as well as VPNs and tracking blockers for private browsing online.

Make sure your security suite is installed, updated and ready to protect you before you start entering your credit card details and your shipping address online.

2. Know your payment methods – Whether you’re using credit cards, debit cards, online payment platforms like PayPal, or gift cards, it’s important to keep up with which method you used on which website. That way, if there’s suspicious activity on your card or account later, you can trace it back to which site you may have used.

It’s also a good idea to know ahead of time what kinds of consumer protection are in place in case of fraud. Will your credit card company stand up for you if someone steals your information or racks up extra charges? Will they protect you if the website you used was a scam and they never send your purchases? Find out the rules and regulations—as well as what kinds of money-saving deals and discounts, if any—are in place before you use it.

3. Know what you’re clicking – Fake websites, copycat websites that look like real retailers’ sites, and bogus ads that only lead to click-revenue are the bane of every shopper’s existence at this time of year. Look for the site’s HTTPS designation before you enter any payment details, and make sure this is a reputable company before you pay for anything. A quick Google search for the name of the company or a check of the BBB’s scam tracker can tell you if there are any dissatisfied customers out there.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

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There were more than 184 million ransomware attacks around the world last year, and there’s no sign that this type of cybercrime is slowing down. If anything, the effectiveness and lucrative payouts for hackers could mean even higher numbers of attacks in the coming months.

Are you prepared? Is your workplace?

The first step is to understand how ransomware works. The culprits behind the attack can be some of the most sophisticated hackers in their field, or they may be nothing more than a low-level user who has purchased some malicious software on the Dark Web. A highly-skilled hacker can infiltrate your network, while a less adept cybercriminal relies on getting you to install the malicious software for them through a phishing email or other social engineering.

Once the harmful software is on your network, though, your files and system are locked up tight. The only way to regain access—and restore day-to-day business—is to pay the ransom and hope the criminal decides to give you the necessary decryption key. (In too many cases, the thieves made off with the ransom and refused to unlock the victim’s computers.)

One recent profile of ransomware victims demonstrated a couple of different approaches to dealing with an attack. In one instance, a city government was infiltrated; they decided to pay the ransom and hope for the best. In the other case, city officials decided not to pay the ransom and instead rely on the backups of their important files.

So who was right? It doesn’t matter. Every ransomware attack and every victim are different, so making a sound decision about recovery should be the work of the victim, law enforcement, and security experts.

But here are some things to consider:

  • While businesses are more likely to provide a bigger payout, criminals know that individuals might pay up in order to retrieve their precious photos, videos, stored content, and more.
  • Paying the ransom is absolutely no guarantee that a hacker will decrypt your files or unlock your computer.
  • The best defense against this kind of attack is to routinely back up all of your files and important folders.
  • Ensuring that you, your family members, and your company’s workforce can spot a phishing attempt and avoid installing harmful software will also help protect you.
  • A company-wide policy about never downloading unknown files, never clicking on links in emails, never opening unexpected attachments, and other dangerous behaviors can also secure your network from this kind of attack.

No matter what steps you take, it’s important to stay on top of cyberthreats and scam attempts. Regular company training and a comprehensive company-wide computer use policy can help protect your business network, and monitoring computer use at home can do the same. As always, installing and updating a strong antivirus solution to block these threats is important, too.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Read next: “I’ve Hacked Your Password” Scam

Most consumers probably have some level of knowledge about identity theft and fraud. It might only be a passing familiarity thanks to news headlines about record-setting numbers of data breaches. For others, their deeper knowledge of this kind of crime may come from having already been victimized. As anyone who has had to navigate the aftermath of identity theft crimes can tell you, it carries a lasting—possibly even lifelong—impact.

So how much do you really know about this crime? (You can take this short quiz to find out!)

The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, ACFE for short, wants to help every consumer be as fraud-aware as possible in order to reduce their risk of becoming a victim. The organization hosts an annual event each November known as Fraud Week, and together with the Identity Theft Resource Center will host a Twitter chat filled with important tips and information for the public.

International Fraud Awareness Week will run from November 11th through 17th, and while some of the information is geared towards preventing this crime within the business sector, there are plenty of resources for everyday consumers. You can sign up to host a local community education event, direct your company or business to informational webinars, and find ideas for posting on social media to raise awareness. One great item to share on your social media channels is this ACFE video on identity theft and fraud, for example.

Of course, joining the Twitter chat on November 15th is another great way to get involved and stay informed. The ITRC and ACFE will co-host the free event online at 3pm ET/12pm PT, and participants only need to log into their Twitter accounts and search for The #fraudweekchat hashtag to participate. Be sure to add the hashtag to all of your questions or comments so other participants and the chat hosts can see them.

Finally, one of the best ways to really understand the impact of fraud is to hear from the victims themselves. The ITRC’s annual Aftermath report compiles information from victim surveys, which were completed by people who reached out to the organization for help during the previous year. This information explores not only the financial impact of this crime, but also the mental, emotional, and even physical effects of being a victim.

To say that it’s up to the victims to prevent identity theft and fraud is wrong; in too many cases, the victim couldn’t have done anything to prevent the crime. However, there are ways consumers can reduce their risk, recover as quickly as possible, and minimize the lasting effects. Knowing how to recover from this kind of crime starts without knowing what preventive measures to put in place, what steps to take in the event of fraud, and what resources are available to help victims. It all starts with awareness, so make plans to be a part of Fraud Week.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Read next: “Vote By Phone” Scam

Most consumers probably have some level of knowledge about identity theft and fraud. It might only be a passing familiarity thanks to news headlines about record-setting numbers of data breaches. For others, their deeper knowledge of this kind of crime may come from having already been victimized. As anyone who has had to navigate the aftermath of identity theft crimes can tell you, it carries a lasting—possibly even lifelong—impact.

So how much do you really know about this crime? (You can take this short quiz to find out!)

The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, ACFE for short, wants to help every consumer be as fraud-aware as possible in order to reduce their risk of becoming a victim. The organization hosts an annual event each November known as Fraud Week, and together with the Identity Theft Resource Center will host a Twitter chat filled with important tips and information for the public.

International Fraud Awareness Week will run from November 11th through 17th, and while some of the information is geared towards preventing this crime within the business sector, there are plenty of resources for everyday consumers. You can sign up to host a local community education event, direct your company or business to informational webinars, and find ideas for posting on social media to raise awareness. One great item to share on your social media channels is this ACFE video on identity theft and fraud, for example.

Of course, joining the Twitter chat on November 15th is another great way to get involved and stay informed. The ITRC and ACFE will co-host the free event online at 3pm ET/12pm PT, and participants only need to log into their Twitter accounts and search for The #fraudweekchat hashtag to participate. Be sure to add the hashtag to all of your questions or comments so other participants and the chat hosts can see them.

Finally, one of the best ways to really understand the impact of fraud is to hear from the victims themselves. The ITRC’s annual Aftermath report compiles information from victim surveys, which were completed by people who reached out to the organization for help during the previous year. This information explores not only the financial impact of this crime, but also the mental, emotional, and even physical effects of being a victim.

To say that it’s up to the victims to prevent identity theft and fraud is wrong; in too many cases, the victim couldn’t have done anything to prevent the crime. However, there are ways consumers can reduce their risk, recover as quickly as possible, and minimize the lasting effects. Knowing how to recover from this kind of crime starts without knowing what preventive measures to put in place, what steps to take in the event of fraud, and what resources are available to help victims. It all starts with awareness, so make plans to be a part of Fraud Week.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Read next: “Vote By Phone” Scam

On November 6th, citizens will cast their votes for governors, state officials, or members of Congress, either continuing to support the incumbent or opting to make a change with a new candidate. In any event, the work of campaigning and elections are big business…especially for scammers.

With so much discussion about the mid-term elections, thieves have launched a wide variety of election season scams to steal personally identifiable information, financial resources, or both.

1. Phishing attempts – Candidates and political parties rely on emails and phone calls to connect with voters, and scammers are using the same tactics. By posing as members of a campaign, scammers target their victims with phony donation requests, fake news articles that encourage them to click and input their information to read, and more. The goal in these scams isn’t just money, but also access to your personal data.

2. Donation requests – It takes a lot of money to put on an effective campaign, so political candidates often request donations, host fundraisers, and more. Thanks to online platforms, candidates or their team members can request money via social media and platforms like GoFundMe or PayPal. However, the natural mechanism that allows candidates to do that effectively also means a scammer can do it, too. Be on your guard for similar names, “patriotic”-sounding organizations, and issue or party-centric groups that are not actually affiliated with anyone campaigning.

3. Fake robocalls – There have already been reports of robocalls associated with particular candidates for promotional purposes, and remember, charitable organizations and political ads are two of the categories that are exempt from the Do Not Call registry. However, some of the robocalls have not only been spoofed or use stolen recordings of the candidates, but some of them have also even been highly offensive and designed to get the listener to interact.

So how are you supposed to protect yourself from elections season scams? By using the exact same good habits that are designed to keep you safe from scams throughout the year. Never give out your information or verify your identity to someone who contacts you; never make a spur-of-the-moment donation or spontaneously pay a fee, fine, or bill; remember that anyone can create an email account or website, and it doesn’t take any effort or know-how to copy or mimic an existing organization.

Keep your identity and your finances secure by being cautious about how you interact with the campaign process this year…and don’t forget to vote!


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Read next: “Vote By Phone” Scam