Most iPhone users store a considerable amount of personal data on their phone that would be devastating to lose. This can be in the form of pictures, saved PDFs, passwords, banking information, credit card information, and personal text messages. Therefore, it is extremely important to keep your iPhone as secure as possible. Luckily, there are a few simple things that you can do to help ensure the safety of the personal information on your iPhone.

  • Enable the Auto-Lock and Passcode Lock features under the general settings. The Auto-Lock feature will automatically lock your phone after it has been sitting idle for an amount of time that you pre-determine. The Passcode Lock feature will require a 4 digit password anytime someone attempts to access the phone when it is locked. These two simple features provide significant deterrence to the random individual who may try to steal your phone when you leave it sitting about.
  • Siri is incredibly useful and is capable of accessing and providing personal information to whoever is using the iPhone. Unfortunately, a user is allowed to communicate with Siri even if the phone is locked. Thus, Siri can be used as a workaround to the passcode feature, giving access to personal data when the iPhone owner thinks that the phone is locked down. In the Passcode Lock menu, you can opt to turn off Siri while the phone is locked.
  • Use a Virtual Private Network (VPN) when using the iPhone to access the internet from public WiFi locations. Public WiFi poses a danger to your iPhone and personal data because hackers can use public WiFi hotspots to monitor what you are doing on your iPhone as well as what information you may be inputting into it as well. A Virtual Private Network encrypts the signals from your iPhone making it impossible for hackers to decipher what you are doing on the internet.
  • Always have an updated antivirus program installed on your iPhone to help prevent virus or other malware from infecting your phone.
  • Enable Find my iPhone under the iCloud settings which will allow you to determine where your iPhone is at any given time in addition to giving you the ability to remotely wipe your phone of all its information. This is extremely useful because the 4 digit passcode can easily be decoded by a determined hacker. With this feature enabled, if you lose your iPhone all you have to do is sign onto any computer and elect to remotely wipe your iPhone of all its information.

“How to Protect Data on Your iPhone” was written by Sam Imandoust, Esq. He serves as a legal analyst for the Identity Theft Resource Center. We welcome you to post/reprint the above article, as written, giving credit to and linking back to the original post.

Most of us who own smart phones store a considerable amount of personal data on them which could be very damaging if the phone was lost or stolen. Everything from valuable documents, passwords, personal pictures, banking or credit information, and personal text messages could be compromised. Fortunately, there are several steps one can take to protect the data stored on their phone. What follows are some best practices for protecting the data on your Android Smart phone.

  • Enable the Auto-Lock and Passcode Lock features under the general settings. Go to your settings, and then select “security.” The Auto-Lock feature will automatically lock your phone after it has been sitting idle for an amount of time that you pre-determine. The Passcode Lock feature will require a password, or a trace design anytime someone attempts to access the phone when it is locked. These two simple features provide significant deterrence to the random individual who may try to steal your phone if it’s left unattended.
  • Use a Virtual Private Network (VPN) when using your phone to access the internet via public WiFi. Public WiFi poses a danger to your personal data because hackers can use public WiFi hotspots to monitor what you are doing as well as what information you may be sending over the internet. A Virtual Private Network encrypts the signals from your Android making it impossible for hackers to decipher what you are doing on the internet.
  • Always have an updated antivirus program installed on your Android to help prevent virus or other malware from infecting your phone. Monitoring apps such as Lookout Security can gauge the risk levels of various apps or programs you might be inclined to install on your phone.
  • Always pay attention to what apps you’re downloading. What access rights to your data does it ask for? Is it produced by a reliable/trustworthy entity? Never download an app you’re not 100% sure about, and always pay attention to what rights they require to install their app in your phone.
  • Install a wiping program on your phone so that in the event of a theft or a loss, you will be able to remotely wipe all your sensitive data from the phone so the thief cannot benefit from it.
  • Never pre-store banking passwords or other sensitive passwords on your phone. If someone were to gain access to your Android, there’s no reason that event needs to preclude a thief gaining access to your email or your mobile banking apps.

“Keeping your Information Safe on an Android Device” was written by Matt Davis. Matt is a Victim Advisor at the Identity Theft Resource Center. We welcome you to post/reprint the above article, as written, giving credit to and linking back to the original article.

Identity theft related tax fraud occurs when an identity thief somehow obtains your name and Social Security number and uses this information to file a fraudulent tax return in your name. Tax fraud resulting from identity  theft can affect individuals or businesses and often the same information can be used to ultimately commit tax fraud against both. There are many ways that identity thieves can steal your information including: phishing emails, snooping through your trash for intact documents, hacking into an entity that has your personal information, stealing or finding your wallet/purse, public WiFi monitoring, changing the designated agent of business entities and the list goes on.

Once your personal or business information has been stolen, identity thieves can use this information to file fraudulent tax returns to the IRS and other tax authorities in order to receive credits or refunds. The identity thieves prefer to have the funds distributed by the IRS in the form of a pre-loaded debit card or a direct deposit which helps them avoid having to deal with security measures related to cashing a paper check. After receiving money from the fraudulent filings the identity thieves will disappear, leaving the victim individual or business owner without their refund or with substantial bills owed to the tax authorities.

The most common issue people face is a delay of their anticipated refunds. When an identity thief files your tax returns before you do, the tax return you file yourself comes under suspicion as it is a second return filed for the same taxpayer. The IRS will require that you send them an IRS Identity Theft Affidavit (Form 14039) with proof of your identity in order to confirm that you indeed are the real taxpayer. This process can be lengthy and your refund will not be processed until you are confirmed by the IRS to be the actual taxpayer. Other consequences of this crime can be severe as victims can also be left to deal with any resulting collection actions, audits, and the possibility of fighting aggressive tax collection through the IRS appeals process.

In late 2012, after the IRS reported that it had identified 642,000 tax returns affected by identity theft, the United States Government Accountability Office’s Director of Strategic Issues, James R. White, conducted a review and provided testimony as to why so many fraudulent returns are getting by the system. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that there were “several areas where the extent and nature of identity theft is unknown.” First, the total number and cost of fraudulent returns is hard to determine because the IRS can count the number of identity theft related incidences they discover, but they have no accurate way of determining how many they are missing. Second, the IRS usually doesn’t know the identity of the criminal unless they open a criminal investigation. Third, it is difficult determining whether a fraudulent return is part of a broader scheme as analysts cannot always identify indications of large tax identity theft schemes. Last, the characteristics of known identity theft returns are not as clear as the IRS would like as the agency does not currently track the characteristics of those returns.

This does not mean the IRS is sitting idly while allowing the fraudulent returns to be processed. The IRS developed the Internal Refund Fraud and Identity Theft Global Report (Global Report) to begin keeping track of information in their system related to identity theft incidents. IRS senior management will use this information to implement more protocols to reduce tax identity theft and it will be used as a source of information that can be sent to external entities requesting information. In addition, the IRS has already instated multiple protocols that began in 2012 or are slated to begin in 2013 as I have written about in an earlier article.

What you can do to minimize your risk of identity theft related tax fraud is to simply file your tax return first. This effectively turns the tables on the identity thief as your return will be accepted by the IRS and the criminal’s fraudulent return in your name will be denied. Now it will be incumbent upon the identity thief to provide information proving that they are indeed you, which will most likely end their attempt to defraud you and the IRS. It is unclear when exactly the IRS will begin accepting returns this year as the delay in resolving the fiscal cliff may postpone the filing period a few weeks. Regardless of when the filing period begins, try to file your return as early as possible and you will be well on your way to avoiding tax fraud this tax season!

“The Importance of Filing Taxes Early” was written by Sam Imandoust, Esq. He serves as a legal analyst for the Identity Theft Resource Center. We welcome you to post/reprint the above article, as written, giving credit to and linking back to the original article.

When it comes to identity theft, there’s a great deal of consumer confusion as to what function law enforcement plays in cleaning up your identity theft mess. “Should I file a police report?” is one of the more common questions our ITRC advisors’ field on a daily basis.

When it comes to reporting and recovering from identity theft, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is working to simplify the process.

For years, identity theft victims have been encouraged to file a police report as soon as they discover they’ve been victimized. It wasn’t so much that the police were going to find your thief—but that it served as sworn proof that you claim to be innocent of the damage the thief did with your credit cards, identifying papers, and more. Filing a false police report is its own crime, so by seeking a police report, you were essentially saying, “I swear under oath that I’m not the one responsible for this mess.”

Unfortunately, with so many up-in-the-air variables about identity theft, many law enforcement departments were left scratching their heads. Where were they supposed to start looking if a “Nigerian prince” stole your money, or a phone scammer stole your credit card information? Too often, the police report ended up being nothing more than a piece of paper that you could hold up if someone accused you of a crime.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is working to change that.

Now, instead of suggesting that all victims file a local police report, the agency runs IdentityTheft.gov, a one-stop-shopping method of getting the documentation you need to supply to different companies and organizations. Along with things like a personal recovery action plan, you’ll also receive pre-filled letters to give to your bank, credit card companies, utility companies, and more saving you some of a headache and legwork. You’ll also file an “Identity Theft Report,” which is your official statement about the crime.

This Identity Theft Report is not only legal and binding as your proof that you claim to be innocent of any damage, it’s filed automatically with the FTC, a federal law enforcement agency. However, there may be some circumstances where you’d still want to file a local police report; according to the FTC, those reasons may include:

– you know the identity thief, or have other information that could help a police investigation

– an identity thief used your name in a traffic stop or any encounter with police, or

– a creditor, debt collector, or someone else affected by the identity theft insists that you produce a police report.

If you have information that will help your local police department make an arrest, by all means, speak to that agency. Likewise, if your identity may have been supplied to police in an unrelated crime—such as someone is found with drugs in their car and supplies your name to the police—then you’ll certainly want to pay a visit to your local law enforcement office.

Remember, whether it’s filed through your local police department or the FTC’s IdentityTheft.gov website, the purpose of the report is two-fold. It serves as your declaration that you are innocent if your identity is used illegally, and it helps begin the investigation. Clearing your name is never easy, but the FTC is working to streamline the process and reduce the amount of time it takes to recover.

If you have additional questions about the cleanup process, contact the ITRC toll-free at (888) 400-5530


For on-the-go assistance, download the free ID Theft Help App.

There is something truly terrifying about the thought of losing your passport. It brings to mind being mugged in a third world country and unable to get home. More often, the situation is nothing as exotic, but it can be very stressful nonetheless. A lost or stolen passport is a very serious situation, even when you don’t need it to re-enter the United States. The reality is that a lost or stolen passport, or the loss of your passport number through a data breach, can mean more than the pain and expense of getting a new document. It can also lead to serious cases of identity theft. So if you find yourself with a lost or stolen passport document, or stolen passport number, you want to be sure that you handle the situation appropriately and quickly.

Here are the steps you want to take if your passport document is lost or your passport document or number is stolen:

1.Call the State Department’s office with any questions at 1-877-487-2778 (TTY 1-888-874-7793).  They have representatives that can help you fro

m 8 am to 10 pm Eastern Time, Monday-Friday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Saturdays.

2. You can report a lost or stolen passport via mail, phone, or online. In all instances, you will need to fill out Form DS-64: Statement Regarding Lost or Stolen Passport.  This is incredibly important to do as soon as possible after the discovery of theft or loss in order to avoid the use of your passport for illegal activities including, but not limited to, criminal identity theft.

3. Once your passport has been reported lost or stolen it is invalid and cannot be used again. You will need to apply for a new passport in person by filling out Form DS-11: Application for a U.S. Passport. A specialist will take a report over the phone and your passport will immediately be deactivated.

4. If your passport was stolen, file a police report. A crime has taken place and should be reported to the police. Also, you never know when you may need proof that the document was stolen. In most places, you can file a police report for a non-emergency online. If the passport went missing from a home burglary or a stolen purse, make sure to specify that the passport is among the things missing.

5. If your passport number was stolen in a data breach, but you still have your passport in your possession, there is no way to flag your passport to alert authorities.  Passports numbers can be used in conjunction with other pieces of personally identifiable information (PII) to commit criminal identity theft.  Contact the National Passport Information Center at 1-877-487-2778 or NPIC@state.gov for more information about the steps that can be taken if you are concerned your passport number may be used by someone other than you.

Losing a passport or having one stolen can be scary. However, if you follow the above steps you will be back to your jet-setting ways in no time… or 2-4 weeks. More importantly, you have taken steps to protect yourself against the chance of identity theft.

Anyone who believes their identity has been stolen or their personal data has been compromised is invited to connect with the ITRC through our toll-free call center at (888) 400-5530 or on-the-go with the new IDTheftHelp app for iOS and Android.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ITRC Announces Eva Casey Velasquez as new President/CEO

The Identity Theft Resource Center has just announced the appointment of Eva Casey Velasquez as its new President/CEO. Velasquez most recently served as the Vice President of Operations for the San Diego Better Business Bureau, where she managed the Bureau’s the Bureau’s operations department that supplies the core services of dispute resolution, arbitration, and pre-purchase information to the public.

Prior to that appointment, she spent 21 years at the San Diego District Attorney’s Office, with the last 11 of those years spent investigating and assisting in the prosecution of economic/financial crimes, with a focus on consumer protection issues.

Eva VelasquezVelasquez has more than 500 hours of specialized training in the investigation of economic crimes and has been a presenter at numerous conferences across the state, including the PACT (Professionals Achieving Consumer Trust) Summit, the California District Attorney’s Association Consumer Protection Conference and the California Consumer Affairs Association annual conference.operations department that supplies the core services of dispute resolution, arbitration, and pre-purchase information to the public. Prior to that appointment, she spent 21 years at the San Diego District Attorney’s Office, with the last 11 of those years spent investigating and assisting in the prosecution of economic/financial crimes, with a focus on consumer protection issues.

“I am thrilled to be given the opportunity to work with an organization that has been a part of the San Diego consumer protection landscape since 1999. I have always been impressed with the advocacy and pioneering work that the ITRC has accomplished on behalf of the victims of identity theft. I look forward to furthering this established mission and ensuring that there are NO victims of identity theft that are left to fend for themselves or are unaware of our resources.”

In addition, she served as the chairman of the Consumer Fraud Task Force for 13 years, was a past Vice President of the California Consumer Affairs Association, and most recently was a finalist in the 2012 San Diego Business Journal‘s Women Who Mean Business Awards.

“Eva’s leadership experience for the past five years at the Better Business Bureau combined with her strong passion for protecting consumers is a perfect fit for our next CEO/Executive Director at the Identity Theft Resource Center,” said Julie Fergerson, Vice President of Emerging Technology, Ethoca, and Co-founder of the Merchant Risk Council. “I am personally very excited for our organization. Through Eva’s leadership, the ITRC will be able to expand its national reach in helping consumers recover from identity theft as well as provide educational programs to help consumers minimize their risk of identity theft,” continued Fergerson.

About the ITRC

The Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity theft in resolving their cases, and to broaden public education and awareness in the understanding of identity theft. It is the on-going mission of the ITRC to assist victims, educate consumers, research identity theft and increase public and corporate awareness about this problem. Victims may contact the ITRC toll-free at 888-400-5530 or visit us online at http://www.idtheftcenter.org.

A report published by identity intelligence research organisation ID Analytics last month indicates that there are approximately ten thousand different identity theft rings operating in the US. The organisation examined over a billion credit card, store card and wireless service applications over a four-year period in order to arrive at this figure. Its algorithm picked up on the presence of identity thieves by searching for constantly changing addresses or discrepancies in personal information, which are red flags indicating fraud.

ID Analytics concluded that certain areas of the country have far higher concentrations of identity thieves than others. The most popular states for these crooks are thought to be North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, Texas, Mississippi, Georgia and Delaware. The report states that there seems to be a ‘belt of fraud’ running through the rural Southeast.

Who Are These Fraudsters?

ID Analytics stated that whilst some fraud rings consist of just a few people, others are significantly larger. The research uncovered a surprising number of rings that consist of families working together, some of them even using each other’s dates of birth and social security numbers. A family of five in Florida were thought to have filed at least one hundred and thirty fraudulent applications over a two-week period.

They were believed to have been committing frauds for at least three years using more than eleven dates of birth and eight social security numbers. This family all lived together and co-ordinated their activities so that one of them would operate for a couple of days and then stop for a few days whilst the next person operated.

However, rings made up of friends were found to be more common, as the majority of fraud ring members had different last names to one another. The three-digit ZIP codes with the highest numbers of fraud rings were observed to be areas around Tampa in Florida, Washington DC, Greenville in Mississippi, Macon in Georgia, Montgomery in Alabama and Detroit.

Impersonating both the Dead and the Living

The study highlighted a trend towards stealing dead people’s identities. ID Analytics stated that identity fraudsters gather together personal information associated with individuals that they know have passed away and use the information to open credit card accounts and purchase goods. When the bill arrives, there is no responsible party. Two and a half million dead people are thought to have their identities stolen each year.

Straightforward identity theft was also identified as one of the main forms of ID fraud. Crooks are still fond of using the traditional method of obtaining victims’ dates of birth, social security numbers, names, etc. This can enable them to get a whole host of other information and can be incredibly costly. For instance, if they are able to get hold of a credit card in somebody else’s name then they can get a credit card cash advance. One of the risks associated with getting cash advances on credit cards is that if it is done by a fraudster, it is possible to steal more money than the card owner actually possesses, making this a particularly attractive prospect for ID thieves.

Implications

Chief technology officer of ID Analytics Stephen Coggleshall claims that by taking a broad approach to ID theft and examining the way in which ‘bad people’ are connected to one another as opposed to the activities of individuals, the company has uncovered information that can improve customer protection. The research conducted by the organisation challenges the commonly held perception that identity fraudsters are ‘tech geeks’ pounding away on keyboards.

They are often simply persistent criminals who will stop at nothing to deprive people of their money. It also highlights the amount of homegrown ID fraudsters. Identity thieves are often stereotyped as being Eastern European but the research shows that large numbers of them are American, many of them living in rural communities.

This emphasizes the fact that people need to be extra careful with their personal information, as these thieves could be living next door. It highlights the scale of the threat that identity fraud poses to the country’s wallets and also indicates that significant numbers of individuals line their pockets by carrying out this type of crime.

“Ten Thousand Identity Theft Rings Operating in the United States” was written by Melissa Hathaway.  Melissa is a personal finance writer and former bank teller turned personal finance writer, offering advice and tips to publications on both sides of the pond. Source: http://www.money.co.uk/article/1001859-the-real-cost-of-cash-on-credit.htm

The problem of identity theft is slowly making progress in the sphere of awareness for the general public, but business identity theft is a less known and understood crime. Business identity theft is a crime where an identity thief will use a business’ identity to empty corporate bank accounts, take out new lines of credit, make fraudulent purchases, or even apply for tax credits or refunds.

Business identity theft, also known as corporate identity theft, will typically involve a criminal fraudulently modifying a business’ records that are filed with a Business ID Theftstate’s government organization responsible for maintaining business records, often the state’s Secretary of State. The majority of states do not have any authentication procedures requiring anyone sending in documents on behalf of a business to prove that they are the owners of the business. thief will use a business’ identity to empty corporate bank accounts, take out new lines of credit, make fraudulent purchases, or even apply for tax credits or refunds.

Criminals will use this lax business records system to change the business’ address, the business’ registered agent, and its corporate officers. Dormant businesses are particularly vulnerable to identity theft as they are still valid business organizations, but the owners have stopped operating the business and assume that it will stay inactive.

This allows the identity thieves to fraudulently use the business’ identity for a longer period of time before anyone becomes aware of the crime. Criminals will target these dormant businesses and effectively bring them back to life by filing the appropriate documents with the state, then use the business’ identity to pile up debt and steal as much money as possible before packing up and moving on to the next unsuspecting business.

While there is no surefire way to prevent corporate identity theft, following the recommendations listed below provided by the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS) will help minimize the risk of your business’ identity being stolen:

  1. File all business reports and renewals with your state filing offices on time and be aware of who has access to this information within your company
  2. Sign up for email notification of any business record changes if available in your state
  3. Periodically check your business records, even if your business is dissolved or inactive
  4. Sign up for email notifications from banks and other creditors, if available
  5. Monitor business accounts, bills, credit card statements, etcetera, and reconcile your statements on a regular basis
  6. Monitor credit reports and sign up for a credit monitoring service
  7. Safeguard your company’s sensitive information, including account numbers and passwords, being sure to shred any trash that contains this information
  8. Ensure that your computers are secure, and train employees to avoid phishing scams and emails that may contain malicious viruses

If you found this information helpful, you may want to consider taking part in the Identity Theft Resource Center’s Anyone3 fundraising campaign.  For more information or to donate please visit http://www.idtheftcenter.org/itrc-launches-anyone3-campaign.

Medical identity theft occurs when somebody uses your information to obtain medical treatment without your knowledge or consent. Unlike traditional identity theft that requires a social security number, this can be  as simple as using your name, date of birth, and address. The dangerous thing about medical identity theft is that a hospital has to take in any emergency patients and often little attention is paid to whether the information they receive about that patient is accurate when it goes to the billing department.

Medical identity theft comes in two stages. The first is the billing stage. The billing department for any hospital, doctors office, pharmacy, or emergency room will use the information they have on the patient to try to bill them or their insurance provider. Once a victim is notified that their information has been used for medical treatment, they must work with the billing department of the hospital as well as any other groups such as Medicare or their insurance provider to prove that they were not the ones who received treatment. This is made easy by sending a copy of a driver’s license for photo comparison to the patient. The one thing about this process is that it can take many months for the different departments and companies to recognize that identity theft has occurred.

The second stage is the medical history stage. Whatever treatment the identity thief acquired under the victim’s information will now be placed on the victim’s medical record. Most hospitals are now electronically networked and a patient’s information can be accessed and updated from any part of the country. A thief can get prescription drugs, treatment for diseases, surgeries, etc. and it would all show up on the victim’s medical record. This can make it hard for a victim to get the prescription drugs they needs, proper diagnosis of illness, or proper treatment in an emergency situation.

If you discover that you may be the victim of medical identity theft, file a police report with your local police department using the information you have gathered on the fraud. Talk to the billing department of the medical facility as well as any insurance or government agencies that may be involved. Write to the hospital/doctor about viewing your medical history using the form LF 130A. And ask any physicians involved to amend your medical records to reflect that you were not the one who was treated.

For more information please see our Fact Sheet FS 130 on Medical Identity Theft.

“Medical Identity Theft: The Basics” was written by Kat Rocha. Kat is a Victim Advisor at the ITRC. We welcome you to post/reprint the above article, as written, giving credit to and linking back to the original post.

Violence at the hands of a domestic partner is often rooted in that partner’s desire to control. This need to control another human being can take the form of physical violence, verbal abuse and in many situations financial control. This is when identity theft comes into the picture in domestic situations.

Often times at the ITRC, we will get phone calls from an individual who has finally made that amazingly brave first step of trying to remove themselves from the situation. Whether they have physically left the shared domicile or are planning their escape, they realize they will need separate financial resources. It is at this time that they realize they have been a victim of identity theft at the hands of the person they once thought loved them.

If you, or someone you know, is in an abusive situation and believes they may also be victim of identity theft we recommend the following steps:

  • Check your (and your children’s) credit reports: You can do this for free online at www.annualcreditreport.com. Look for accounts or inquiries that you did not make. It may be a credit card or something as large as a mortgage or a vehicle. Once you check the report you will know if you are a victim or not and can take action accordingly. You will also want to check your children’s credit reports if you have children. You can easily check your child’s credit report for free at https://www.allclearid.com/child.
  • Place a 90 day fraud alert: You can place a 90 day fraud alert by phone. Even if an abuser has not used identity theft as a tactic in the past, they may use it as a retaliatory effort once the victim begins the process of separating from the abuser. A 90 day fraud alert will keep them from opening any new accounts.
  • File for separation: When an individual is married, the law looks at the two married people as a single legal entity. If you have not filed for separation, the police will look at the situation as a domestic dispute rather than identity theft. In most states you can file for separation on your own.
  • Obtain a restraining order: While we understand this is a terrifying step, for many victims of domestic violence it is necessary. The first step is to obtain a temporary restraining order, or TRO, which you can do yourself at your local courthouse. It is free to do this in California, but you may want to check with your state to see whether there is a filing fee or not. Though the restraining order is just a piece of paper, if your abuser violates the order and tries to contact you, they will be at risk of going to jail. This is often a satisfactory deterrent to an abuser.
  • Call your bank and creditors: Inform these companies that you are in the process of separation. Place a verbal password that your abuser would not know or be able to guess. Request that no changes be made to your accounts without the verbal password. Also request that no information about the account or the account holder be released.

We know that this is an incredibly difficult situation entangled with emotions and fear. If you have any questions or need further guidance, please call the Identity Theft Resource Center at 888.444.5530 and one of our Victim Advisors will be there to help.

If you found this information helpful, you may want to consider taking part in the Identity Theft Resource Center’s Anyone3 fundraising campaign.  For more information or to donate please visit http://www.idtheftcenter.org/itrc-launches-anyone3-campaign.