• Scammers are looking to take advantage of consumers that need money due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic with a credit line scam. 
  • The scam tries to trick consumers with fake phone calls that look like they are from legitimate banks offering credit lines with low interest rates. Ultimately, scammers are looking to steal sensitive personal information or financial information.  
  • People should be cautious when taking a call from someone claiming to be with a bank. Consumers are encouraged to call the bank directly if they are interested in a new line of credit. Also, if anyone is struggling to pay off their debts, they should only talk to the holder of the debt.   
  • For more information on credit line scams, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website. 

Many people need money due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Scammers are taking advantage by trying to trick consumers with fake phone calls that look like they are from legitimate banks offering lines of credit with a low interest rate. The scam can fool people because the calls can have spoofed phone numbers to make it look like they are coming from a legitimate bank.  

Who ithe Target 

Vulnerable consumers that need money 

What is the Scam 

It is a credit line scam that targets people by phone. The calls begin with a stolen recording from a real bank. Once a “live agent” joins the call, they offer credit lines with low interest rates. However, before the caller gets their new credit line, they have to provide their credit card number and other credit card details. The Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) Midwest Region Office tells ABC 7 Chicago that they have received thousands of complaints about this particular credit line scam.  

What They Want 

Credit card numbers, expiration dates and the three-digit CVV code on the back of the card; stolen credit card information can lead to different forms of financial identity theft 

How You Can Avoid Being Scammed 

  • If you get a call from someone claiming to be with a bank and offering credit, be cautious and don’t give out sensitive personal information. You can also let the call go to voicemail and call the security department directly through the number on the bank’s website.  
  • If you are interested in a credit line, contact your bank directly. 
  • If you are having trouble paying off any of your debts, only talk to the holder of that debt.  

If you believe you are a victim of a credit line scam or would like to learn more, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also speak with an expert advisor on the company website via the live-chat function. 


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Unsubscribe Email Scam Looks to Trick Consumers

  • Domain name scams are making the rounds in hopes of triggering a response from a company’s employees out of fear. 
  • The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) recently received a domain name scam claiming a registrar found the main body of domain names from “RENDE International Ltd.” that were the same as the ITRC’s. 
  • If anyone receives a similar email, ignore it. Never share personal or sensitive information with an unknown company.  
  • For more information, contact the ITRC at no-cost by calling 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website. 

Domain name scams are making their way through different companies, including the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC). The scam is well-known, but small-to-mid-size businesses (SMBs) can be tricked into responding. While scammers send the email in hopes of triggering a response out of fear, it is important employees at businesses of all sizes be able to spot the domain name scam. 

Here is one of a few of the emails that the ITRC recently received: 

Who It Is Targeting 

SMBs; Email users; Employees of companies with websites 

What It Is 

A CEO domain name scam is an email that appears to be a warning for the website owner regarding possible issues with their brand and domain name.

In the case of the ITRC, the email claims a website registrar found the ITRC’s domain name was also being used by “RENDE International Ltd.” The email asks for a response ASAP to “solve the problem promptly.”  

What They Are After 

Scammers hope that companies fear losing their brand identity or trademark information to a competitor that will purchase new domain names. The “registrars” may also charge higher prices than the standard rates offered by reputable registrars.  

How You Can Avoid It 

  • Do not respond to the email. Only renew a domain name through the company where it was initially purchased.  
  • Use the company email provider’s “spam” feature to report the email as junk. 
  • Never share personal or sensitive information with an unknown company. 
  • Companies should train their employees on how to respond to domain name scams and any  attempted scams that could affect the company. 

For more information on how an SMB, or any other company, can avoid a CEO domain name scam, contact the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 to speak with an expert advisor. You can also live-chat through the company website.  

  • The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) discovered multiple social media posts encouraging people to leave their Social Security numbers in the comment section of popular social media sites. It is known as the “Social Security number challenge.” 
  • While many people will not fall for the challenge, it is a reminder that there are fake social media profiles that ask for personal information.  
  • No one should ever give out any personal information publically or to someone they do not know, especially on social media. 
  • For more information, contact the ITRC for no-cost assistance by phone at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat via the company website.  

Have you ever heard of the Social Security number challenge? Someone posts a call to action on social media for people to “drop their Social Security number” in the comments. The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) recently was notified of the trending Social Security number challenge on Facebook. 

Image from Facebook

While the challenge seems far-fetched, it is a good reminder that there are fake social media profiles that ask for personal information like “your mother’s maiden name” or “the answer to your security question.”  

Who It Is Targeting 

Facebook and social media users 

What It Is 

A social media challenge where someone posts on social media asking others to place their Social Security number in the comments. It is known as the “Social Security number challenge.”  

What They Are After 

In this particular case, people’s Social Security numbers. However, there are fake social media profiles that ask for other personal information like account security answers (your mother’s maiden name or dog’s name) that could lead to lots of damage if used in your password or other.

What You Can Do 

Never give out personal information to anyone you do not know. It’s impossible to know whose hands the information will end up in and what they might do with it. Personal information can be used to commit many different forms of identity theft. 

If you want to learn more about social media safety or have questions about the use of your Social Security number, contact the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 to speak with an expert advisor. You can also live-chat with an advisor on the company website.  


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  • A new unsubscribe email scam tries to scare people into “unsubscribing” from confirmation emails coming from an adult dating list.
  • The unsubscribe button could lead to malware or to a form to steal your personal information.
  • Anyone who receives a suspicious email they are not expecting should ignore it and not click on any links, open any attachments, or download any files. Users can also report the email as spam.
  • For more information, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat with an expert advisor on the company website.

Scammers are always looking for new ways to dupe consumers into turning over their personal information or spreading malware to one of their devices. A new unsubscribe email scam reported to the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) tries to trick people into clicking an “unsubscribe button” that could be either a malicious link or a form to steal your personal information.

Who It Is Targeting

Email users

What It Is

A “confirmation” email that claims you received a private message from an adult dating website. The fake email asks the user to confirm by entering their email address and name, and it gives people an option to “unsubscribe” if they would like to stop receiving the adult dating list emails. Scammers use scare tactics such as an email from an adult website in hopes people will click the “unsubscribe” button.

What They Are After

Entering your email address and name into the confirmation email gives cybercriminals the personal information needed to commit identity crimes. Clicking the “unsubscribe” button could lead to malware infecting your device, or to a form that asks for your personal information.

What You Can Do

  • If you receive a suspicious or unexpected message that includes links or asks for your information, ignore it. If it claims to be from a legitimate company, go directly to the source to verify the validity of the message.
  • Do not click on any links, open any attachments, or download any files in an email or text unless you confirm it is legitimate.
  • Use your email provider’s “spam” feature to report the email as junk rather than clicking unsubscribe.

If you believe you have fallen victim to an unsubscribe email scam or have additional questions, call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat with an expert advisor on the company website.

  • The Federal Trade Commission reports that people who lost money to scams that started on social media has more than tripled in 2020, with a significant increase in the second quarter of the year. 
  • The increase in social media scams fits the overall 2020 trend of more phishing scams on channels besides email. 
  • Some recent social media scams include romance scamsfake advertisements, and social media messages offering grant money or giveaways. 
  • To reduce the risk of falling for a social media scam, don’t click on any links from unknown messages, do research on any ad seen on social media, and never send money to someone you’ve never met in person. 
  • To learn more, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530, or speak with an expert advisor via live-chat on the company website. 

There is an increase of social media scams in 2020, fitting the overall trend of the year of more phishing scams on channels besides email. Scams strike people in many different ways, ranging from robocalls to phishing attacks. While social media websites are another platform scammers use for their attacks, it’s not always the first place people think to monitor when they hear the phrase “phishing scams.” 

Scammers Take Advantage of More People Online During COVID-19 

However, 2020 is different. Social media is already a great place to connect, but especially right now due to COVID-19. More people are using social media, and scammers are aware. In fact, more scammers are hanging out on the sites, posing a greater threat for scams to users. Scammers know COVID-19 changes the way people live, and they try to take advantage in any way possible. 

New Report on Increase in Social Media Scams 

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) reports that people who lost money to scams that started on social media has more than tripled in 2020, with a significant increase in the second quarter of the year. The FTC says the growth has been happening for years, reporting social media scam fraud losses of $134 million in 2019.  

However, the first half of 2020 had $117 million in fraud losses from social media scams alone. Some recent social media scams include romance scamsfake advertisements, and social media messages offering grant money or giveaways. Often, scammers create fake profiles of people victims may know to take advantage of them. In some cases, scammers will even take over a real person’s account. 

How to Avoid a Social Media Scam 

Consumers can do a handful of things to reduce their risk of falling victim to a social media scam.  

  1. Check the validity of any ad you see on social media. Do a quick Google search of the supposed business followed by “complaints,” “reviews” or “scam.” This will help you determine whether or not the company has been reported or accused of any suspicious activity. Also, directly search for the company website. Any legitimate company will most likely have contact information on their webpage. 
  1. Never click on a link or open an attachment without verifying the validity of the message or ad. You can do this by directly reaching out to the company to see if they sent the message or posted the ad. If not, it is probably a scam. If you cannot find any contact information for the company, it is probably a scam. 
  1. Reach out directly by phone or email to the friend or family member asking for money or personal information. If they did not send the message, the sender’s account was probably hacked. 
  1. Never send money or personal information to someone you have never met in person. Imposter scams, where scammers try to trick people into giving up personal information or money by posing as someone fake, continue to rise throughout the country.  
  1. Regularly check your privacy settings on all of your social media platforms. Make it more challenging for scammers to target you by limiting what you share online. 

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center 

Consumers should be aware of the 2020 trend around scams and that scammers will continue to hang out in the social media space. However, if everyone does their part, they can still enjoy the platforms with minimal risk of falling for a social media scam.  

To learn more, or if you believe you are the victim of a social media scam, reach out to the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) toll-free at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website. Also, download the ITRC’s free ID Theft Help app for access to additional resources. 


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Election Scams Begin to Surface with the General Election Less than One Month Away

  • Election scams are beginning to appear, prompting the FBI and Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) to warn consumers that spoofed internet domains and email accounts pose cyber and disinformation risks to voters. 
  • Scammers are also looking to trick voters by mimicking ballot-tracking text services
  • Identity thieves are seeking many different forms of personally identifiable information (PII), looking to commit malware attacks, and creating fake websites to collect PII or spread false or misleading information. 
  • Consumers should never share PII, respond to any unexpected messages until they have verified the website address, email address or text message link by checking with the legitimate source.  
  • For more information, or if you fell victim to an election scam, reach out to the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or on our website via live-chat.  

The general election is less than one month away, and scammers are aware. Multiple voting organizations are expressing concerns over fake election-related websites that look like official voting resources, but contain false or misleading information, as well as phishing emails that are designed to gather personally identifiable information (PII) or spread malware. Some states are also seeing scammers trying to trick voters with phony text messages, like in California, where they mimic ballot-tracking text services. The FBI and Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) want to help people spot and avoid every form of election scam.  

Who It Is Targeting 

Voters; Online device users 

What It Is 

Scammers are using many different tactics to try to trick voters: 

  • They create fake election-related websites to spread misinformation, confuse people, or trick voters into sharing personal information ahead of the November 3 elections. According to the FBI and CISA, election scams around fake websites aim to mislead voters and try to use interest around voting to steal people’s passwords. Scammers create websites that try to imitate election websites by altering one or two letters in the site’s address.  
  • Another election scam the FBI and CISA want people to be aware of is phishing emails. Scammers email voters from spoofed addresses that appear to come from election officials.  
  • Scammers are using text messages to attack, too. Some text messages claim they are from the United States Postal Service (USPS). Others look like they are from the Registrar of Voters asking consumers to take a survey or re-register to vote. Some even offer prizes for voting or registering to vote. 

What They Are After 

“There’s risk to you personally,” James Lee, Chief Operating Officer of the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC), told NBC 7 San Diego in an interview. “And in this case, because we’re talking about an election, there’s risk to our society. There’s risk to our country.” 

All of these election scams try to steal usernames, passwords or email addresses. They lead to the collection of PII and spread malware, leading to the potential of more compromises and financial losses in the future. 

What You Can Do 

  • Verify the spelling of all websites, email addresses or links in text messages. Make sure domains consist of http or https at the beginning of the domain, and .gov at the end if it is a government website. 
  • If you receive an unexpected or unsolicited email or text message, ignore it and do not click on any links. Go directly to the source to verify the validity of the message. 
  • Find election information from trustworthy websites, like the Election Assistance Commission.  
  • Make sure all of your applications are up-to-date and update your anti-virus and anti-malware systems. 
  • If possible, use two-factor authentication (2FA) on your accounts.  
  • Disable or remove unneeded applications from your devices. 

If you believe you are a victim of an election scam or want to learn more, contact the ITRC to speak with an expert advisor toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat with us on our company website. 

  • Scammers are taking advantage of Apple users eager to purchase the iPhone 12 with a chatbot scam offering “a free trial” of the new device.
  • Threat actors are looking to steal people’s credit card information and other identity information. They can use the information to commit financial identity theft.
  • Consumers are urged to ignore any suspicious text messages and verify their validity by going directly to the source.
  • Anyone who believes they are a victim of the phishing scam, or wants to learn more, can call the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530, or live-chat with an expert advisor on our website.

The iPhone 12 is expected to be released in October, and many are restlessly awaiting the anticipated launch. Scammers are aware and are sending iPhone 12 chatbot scams via text message, hoping to steal people’s personal information like names, addresses, and financial information like credit card numbers and security codes. While the scam tries to convince people they have won a free trial of the iPhone 12, the only ones winning with the iPhone 12 chatbot scam are the scammers.

Who It Is Targeting

Apple product users

What It Is

It’s a mobile phishing campaign that is spreading through text messages. The text messages from the iPhone 12 chatbot scam appear to come from an Apple chatbot offering free trials for the iPhone 12 before its release. When people click on the link in the text message, it triggers multiple text messages, ending with one saying the user qualifies for a test group before taking them to a “payment” screen for shipping charges.

What They Are After

The iPhone 12 chatbot scam is ultimately after people’s credit card information. After people click through the questions and learn they are “eligible,” they are taken to the “payment” screen where they are asked to enter their credit card information because there is a “courier delivery charge.” Once victims give out their personally identifiable information (PII), scammers can then use it to commit identity theft.

What You Can Do

  • If you receive a text message you are not expecting that requires you to act, ignore it. Instead, go directly to the source to verify the validity of the message.
  • Look for grammatical errors and stylistic issues in the text message to spot the phishing scam.
  • Remember, if the offer seems too good to be true, it probably is. Do not enter any personal information or click on any links for an offer unless you confirm it is legitimate.

If you believe you have fallen victim to the iPhone 12 chatbot scam or have additional questions, you can call the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat with an expert advisor on the company website.


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  • People selling their homes are receiving unsolicited unemployment benefit payments
  • Scammers are using identity information stolen in data breaches to apply for government benefits
  • If you receive an unsolicited benefits payment, tell your mail carrier or file a fraud report with the Postal Inspector

“After our home was listed on the Multiple Listings Service (MLS), and after major real estate sites like Zillow and Realtor.com picked up our listing, we began receiving dozens of letters daily from the California Employment Development Department. The envelope messaging ranged from everything from ‘timely response requested’ to letters from the Overpayment Department.”

That is what one person recently reported to the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC), and others are experiencing as well. Unemployment benefits mail fraud scams are making the rounds, leading to threat actors exploiting people whose personal information has been stolen or is otherwise public. Crystal contacted the ITRC to see what could be done to stop the daily delivery of fraudulent benefit payments.

“The first time this happened, I returned the letters to the post office with “Return to Sender. Addressee never lived here. Fraudulent” written on each of the envelopes,” Crystal said. “The next day, we received more letters (17), and by day three, when it looked like there were over 25 letters, our postal carrier knocked on the door. He asked if any of these people ever lived here and, after answering no, asked me what I thought was happening. He said he would let the post office inspector know – and that an investigation would be opened.”

Crystal believes the scammers were using her home address to apply for benefits in other people’s names. The U.S. Postal Inspection Service (USPIS) told the ITRC they are aware of the unemployment benefits mail fraud scam where people receive legitimate benefit debit cards, real confirmation and declination letters, and notices of employment in the mail. The USPIS says they are working with letter carriers to help spot these scams.

Who It Is Targeting

Home sellers; unemployment benefit applicants.

What It Is

Mail fraud scams where victims are receiving suspicious mail regarding unemployment benefits.

What They Are After

Scammers use stolen identity information, including Social Security numbers (SSN), to apply for unemployment benefits using the addresses of homes that are being sold. Once approved, the state unknowingly issues benefits to the attackers. These identity thieves hope to retrieve the benefit cards from the mail at the “for sale” house or contact the homeowner to request the mail be forwarded to the thief.

What You Can Do

If a suspicious offer, promotion or solicitation arrives through the mail, give it to your letter carrier and ask them to pass it along to a Postal Inspector. You can also bring it to your local post office, or forward the solicitation to the USPS Criminal Investigation Service Center at:

U.S. Postal Inspection Service

Criminal Investigations Service Center

433 W. Harrison Street, Room 3255

Chicago, IL 60699-3255

You can report fraud at their website http://www.uspis.gov/ or call 877.876.2455 and say “Fraud.”

The ITRC is here for anyone who is targeted with an unemployment benefits mail fraud scam. Victims can call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 or live-chat on the website to speak with an expert advisor.

CashApp scams have seen an uptick since COVID-19 began impacting the United States. In April, we wrote about scammers out in full force trying to get consumers to fall for CashApp scams by clicking on fraudulent and malicious links that could steal people’s money and identity, taking advantage of the economic hardships. Now, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) is receiving multiple calls and live-chats about a twist on the CashApp scam: a CashApp customer support scam.

Who Is Targeted

CashApp users

What It Is

A CashApp customer support scam where scammers act as CashApp customer support on a hotline to gain access to users CashApp accounts or ask users to download software to allow remote access to their mobile device.

What They Are After

Scammers are after money and personal information using a fake customer support hotline. In one CashApp scam case reported to the ITRC, a scammer stole all of the victim’s money and changed their username and password. In another case, a scammer was able to get a hold of the victim’s bank account number and access the victim’s bank account.

How You Can Avoid It

  • As of right now, CashApp only offers customer service via email or through the app, not by telephone. Reach out to customer support directly through the company’s website or app.
  • Never give out personal information over the phone if you do not know who is on the other end.
  • Do not download software to allow third parties to have access to any of your mobile devices.
  • Only use CashApp to transfer money to people you know.
  • Add additional security measures, including multi-factor authentication.

If you think you may have fallen victim to a CashApp customer support scam, you can call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat with an expert advisor on the company website.


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With some businesses opening back up after temporarily closing due to the COVID-19 pandemic, scammers are trying to capitalize using online job scams to steal people’s personal information.

Recently, Scripps Health found hackers exploiting job seekers through phishing emails with Scripps Health-themed “lures.” Scripps sent the following email to warn their community members:

Image provided to the Identity Theft Resource Center by public

ATA Engineering, another San Diego-based company, reports they also are seeing similar-type online job scams.

The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has seen a rise in victims contacting the organization about online job scams, including phishing emails. Some of the particular job scams reported to the ITRC include ones from Indeed, Zip Recruiter, and Facebook. The ITRC has had more than 40 victims reach out about online job scams the last three months.

Who Is It Targeting

People looking for work amist the COVID-19 pandemic

What Is It

Either a fake listing posted on a job board or a phishing email, robocall, social media message, or text message looking for a response.

What Are They After

While scammers attack in different ways, they are all looking for one thing: personal information. They hope they can trick people who are desperate or vulnerable into giving up sensitive data like usernames and passwords, financial data, or Social Security numbers. Once scammers have that information, they can commit many different forms of identity theft.

How You Can Avoid It

  • Never click on a link or open an attachment from an email you are not expecting. Instead, go directly to the source to verify the validity of the message.
  • Review all emails and websites carefully to make sure there are no suspicious addresses, subject lines or URLs.
  • Be careful about how much personal data you share, at least during the application process. Do not turn over information like your Social Security number until you are hired.
  • Make sure you have the job, and it is legitimate, before giving away financial information like a bank account number or routing number for direct depositing of paychecks.

If you think you may have fallen victim to an online job scam, you can call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat with an expert advisor on the company website.


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