Home Page Featured 2

This year’s Cybersecurity Awareness Month initiative highlights the importance of cybersecurity by encouraging individuals & organizations to take measures to ensure they stay safe online  

SAN DIEGO, September 22, 2021 – Today, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC), a nationally recognized nonprofit organization established to support victims of identity crime, announced its commitment to Cybersecurity Awareness Month (CSAM), held annually in October. The ITRC joins the growing global effort to promote the awareness of staying safe online. CSAM 2021 is a collaborative effort among businesses, government agencies, colleges and universities, associations, nonprofit organizations, and individuals committed to the CSAM theme of ‘Do Your Part. #BeCyberSmart.’ 

“The importance of good cybersecurity and its link to identity protection is reinforced every day,” said Eva Velasquez, President and CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center. “Cybersecurity is a critical issue that affects everyone, whether you are a business owner, company employee, or a consumer. Online safety, identity protection and data privacy is important for everyone. The ITRC continues to stay committed to our mission, to help consumers and businesses with best practices, and to help everyone #BeCyberSmart.” 

The ITRC will lead or participate in the following activities during CSAM 2021: 

  • Sept 29, 2021 – “How to Secure Your Online Life” Webinar 

On September 29, the ITRC will take part in a webinar with Verity-IT, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Agency (CISA) of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security on how to secure your online life. The one-hour session will give an overview of the cyber basics. 

  • Oct 6, 2021 – Release of Q3 2021 Data Breach Trend Analysis 

On October 6, the ITRC will release its data breach information for the third quarter of 2021. In the ITRC’s H1 2021 Data Breach Trend Analysis, the ITRC reported a 38 percent increase in data breaches quarter-over-quarter and predicted an all-time high number of data breaches by year’s end if breaches continued at the first half of the year’s pace. Sign up for the Monthly Data Breach Newsletter to get alerts and this report directly to your inbox. 

Save The Date – ITRC 2021 Business Aftermath Report to be released October 2021
  • Oct 27, 2021 – Release of Inaugural Business Aftermath Report 

On October 27, the ITRC will release its first-ever report on the impacts of identity crimes and cyberattacks on small businesses. Cyberattacks and the resulting security and data breaches can have a devastating effect on any business. However, small organizations and solopreneurs often lack the resources to prevent or defend against cybercrimes. The 2021 Business Aftermath Report is the first major independent, publicly-reported research into what happens specifically to small businesses following a data or security breach. Sign up to get this report directly to your inbox and more highlights from the ITRC. 

  • Oct 27, 2021 – Nasdaq Cybersecurity Summit 

On October 27 at 10 a.m. EST/7 a.m. PST, the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA) will host its annual Nasdaq Cybersecurity Summit virtually and at the Nasdaq MarketSite in Times Square, New York. The ITRC will participate as a partner in this event that looks at research and best practices for designing security products and processes that are usable by those who need them. 

  • The ITRC’s Weekly Breach Breakdown and Fraudian Slip Podcast Episodes  

Check out the ITRC’s latest podcasts, “The Fraudian Slip” (monthly), where we talk about all-things identity compromise, crime and fraud that impact people and businesses, as well as “The Weekly Breach Breakdown” (weekly), covering the most recent events and trends related to data security and privacy.  

More on CSAM 2021 

Technology plays a part in almost everything we do in life. Mobile and connected smart devices are woven into society as an integral part of how people communicate and access services essential to their well-being. Despite these great advances in technology and the conveniences this provides, recent events have shown us how quickly our lives and businesses can be disrupted when cybercriminals and adversaries use technology to do harm. Now in its 18th year, CSAM continues to build momentum and impact with the ultimate goal of providing everyone with the information they need to stay safe online.  

The ITRC is proud to support this far-reaching online safety awareness and education initiative co-led by CISA the NCSA. 

For more information about CSAM 2021, staying safe online and how to participate in a wide variety of activities, visit staysafeonline.org/cybersecurity-awareness-month/. You can also follow and use the official hashtag #BeCyberSmart on social media throughout the month.  

About the Identity Theft Resource Center 

Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a national nonprofit organization established to empower and guide consumers, victims, business and government to minimize risk and mitigate the impact of identity compromise and crime. Through public and private support, the ITRC provides no-cost victim assistance and consumer education through its website live-chat idtheftcenter.org and toll-free phone number 888.400.5530. The ITRC also equips consumers and businesses with information about recent data breaches through its data breach tracking tool, notified. The ITRC offers help to specific populations, including the deaf/hard of hearing and blind/low vision communities.  

About Cybersecurity Awareness Month 

Cybersecurity Awareness Month is designed to engage and educate public and private-sector partners through events and initiatives with the goal of raising awareness about cybersecurity to increase the resiliency of the nation in the event of a cyber incident. Since the Presidential proclamation establishing Cybersecurity Awareness Month in 2004, the initiative has been formally recognized by Congress, federal, state and local governments and leaders from industry and academia. This united effort is necessary to maintain a cyberspace that is safer and more resilient and remains a source of tremendous opportunity and growth for years to come. For more information, visit staysafeonline.org/cybersecurity-awareness-month/.  

About National Cyber Security Alliance  

The National Cyber Security Alliance is a nonprofit alliance on a mission to create a more secure connected world. We enable powerful, public-private partnerships in our mission to educate and inspire individuals to protect themselves, their families and their organizations for the collective good. For more information on the National Cyber Security Alliance, please visit https://staysafeonline.org

Media Contact     

Identity Theft Resource Center     
Alex Achten     
Head of Earned & Owned Media Relations      
888.400.5530 Ext. 3611     
media@idtheftcenter.org 

Right now is a very difficult time for a lot of individuals as concerns around the COVID-19 pandemic continue to be at the top of people’s minds. In addition to the inconvenience of social distancing and isolation and the very real fears for personal health and safety, many people are also facing the stress of reduced hours at work, being furloughed or losing their jobs due to quarantine and business closures.

There is another equally upsetting issue at hand: unemployment benefits identity theft. A record-setting 57+ million people in the U.S. filed for unemployment due to COVID-19 between March and September of 2020.

Unemployment benefits identity theft has hit states hard all over the country

While the California Employment Development Department (EDD) reports that employers added 114,400 nonfarm payroll jobs in July 2021, the unemployment rate for the state remains at 7.6 percent. In September 2020, the California EDD put out an alert asking California residents to keep an eye out for fraudulent activity in regards to unemployment benefits in the state.

According to the Los Angeles Times, as of January 26, 2021, California officials say unemployment fraud has totals of more than $11 billion. California has paid out $114 billion in unemployment benefits since March 2020, and the state EDD has processed 19 million claims.

Some residents of West Virginia are receiving unemployment benefit cards they never requested.

The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment says the state has seen nearly 10,000 fake claims. The identity thieves are believed to be just as busy with the filing, too. Many victims have contacted the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) over complaints of unemployment benefits identity theft.

Unemployment benefits identity theft is nothing new

Unemployment benefits identity theft is nothing new. In fact, it is one of many types of government identity theft that can occur when a scammer uses stolen personally identifiable information to apply for benefits through the government. However, with so many consumers filing at the same time, an unfortunate number of people have already reported that a scammer beat them to it. Their claims have been rejected for being duplicate applications while someone else is now set up to receive their benefits.

Like many forms of identity theft, unemployment benefits identity theft is one that victims may not discover until the damage is done. If a claim is turned down for unemployment benefits due to a duplicate application, it is important for people to contact the unemployment agency immediately; the ITRC is another resource to guide victims in this challenge (888.400.5530). In the meantime, there are other ways consumers should take action if their claims are rejected:

Place a freeze on your credit report if it’s feasible

Victims might need to open a new line of credit while they are out of work, but that shouldn’t stop them from placing a freeze. Thawing a credit freeze is extremely simple and quick. This can help block an identity thief who may have their personally identifiable information (since they applied for unemployment benefits in their name) from using it for other purposes.

Monitor accounts carefully

Once again, if a thief has enough information to apply for benefits, they could have access to other information or accounts. Consumers should keep a careful watch on all of their accounts, including their credit reports, and change any online passwords.

Be aware that applying for unemployment is only one step

An identity thief may also fraudulently apply for nutrition assistance, WIC, medical coverage or other benefits. If there are any issues involving those services and someone’s identity, people should contact those agencies immediately.

It is a stressful time for many, and scammers are looking to add to it in many different ways, including unemployment benefits identity theft. It’s also exceptionally difficult given the volume of calls and reduction in services from organizations that a victim needs to contact.

However, the ITRC is here for anyone who falls victim to government identity theft. Victims can also live-chat with an expert advisor or download the ID Theft Help App that will allow them to track their steps in a case log, and get on-the-go assistance.

The post was originally published on 4/10/2020 and was updated on 9/15/2021

Sparking joy has taken on a whole new meaning thanks to the KonMari method of tidying up. Cleaning up your physical and digital life are some ways to prevent identity theft.

Marie Kondo took the world by storm in 2019 with the premise of decluttering your life, tidying up your home and workspaces and living by a simple principle: if it doesn’t “spark joy,” you don’t need it. The mindset behind the so-called KonMari method proved to be so effective that second-hand stores and thrift shops saw record-setting levels of donations.

This decluttering concept can be applied to physical possessions, but you should also consider its ability to benefit other areas of life. For example, you might clean up your email inbox or desktop. There’s another level of protection that consumers can take from this “spark joy” concept, and that’s keeping their identities out of a criminal’s hands.

Before You Begin

Several steps can help you organize your identity before you ever have to deal with cluttering consequences. These would include things like halting subscriptions to magazines and newspapers you don’t read, blocking credit card offers with your financial institutions and going “paperless” on bills and bank statements. By ensuring these things don’t arrive at your home, you’ll have less clutter to deal with and fewer security pitfalls that a thief could exploit.

Another possible vulnerability is your email inbox. Adopt the good habit of not just deleting unwanted emails but actively unsubscribing from them. You will have to open them, scroll down and click unsubscribe. Do not follow this procedure for emails that appear to be scam attempts. Clicking a link can redirect you to a harmful website or install malicious software on your computer. Instead, you should avoid links or attachments in unsolicited messages and block the sender.

One other thing you can do is update your contact information. Review all of your contact information to ensure it is up-to-date and you are not missing any essential information. There are other ways to prevent identity theft.

Physical Mail

As for identity tidying in your home or workplace, that can seem very daunting. Don’t worry; it’s not. By following commonly shared methods from organizational experts like Marie Kondo and others, you can start by creating “piles.” Establish a temporary spot for everything that could be linked back to your identity: a pile for bills, a pile for junk mail and a pile for important papers.

  • The bills: Your monthly statements must be accessible but protected. Find out where you are most likely to see them but keep others from coming across them. As you pay a bill, shred the remaining mailer portion so that you don’t end up with random piles of paper that will need to be addressed later.
  • Junk mail: It’s too easy to toss some junk mail on the counter and think you’ll deal with it later. It’s even easier to throw it in the trash unopened. However, that could lead a dumpster-diving identity thief to pieces of your overall data puzzle. Keep a basket near your cross-cut shredder to stash these items until you’re ready to shred.
  • Important papers: Many people would agree that tax documents, health insurance statements and other key forms don’t “spark joy” and therefore should be done away with immediately. However, that’s not wise. What is helpful is investing in a small file cabinet or file box where important papers can be stored when they are not needed. The file must be accessible in an emergency but not left out in the open where anyone could rifle through it.

Digital Clutter

Your digital identity becomes more important every day as the world evolves to a digital-first model. However, the same principles behind decluttering can help you in the virtual space. Investing in an external hard drive or cloud-based storage subscription can protect the things you want to keep while getting them out of your physical space. Even better, if there’s a paper you might need at a later date, you can photograph it or scan it, then store it in these outside spaces. That way, you can discard the original but retain a protected printable copy if you need it. It is also a good idea to organize your digital files. While it is time-consuming, it will make more space available for the most important things that need to be stored on these devices.

Mobile Apps & Privacy Settings:

  1. Take a look at all of the apps on your device – are there any you’re not using anymore? Delete those.
  2. Visit your mobile device settings to see what information your applications collect from you and update them for increased privacy. For example, you might need to let a map app see your location, but does it need to be active all the time or just when in use? The same thing for photos, do all of your apps need access to your media library? It’s also a good time to run any updates for your phone software or apps.

You should also pay attention to the permissions you allow the mobile apps on your device. Third-parties might be tracking information about you that you might not realize like your location, search history and even your photos through these apps. If they aren’t actively using this collected data, they’re still storing it, leaving your personal information vulnerable to cyberattacks should the third-party fall victim to a breach. Also, think twice before discarding an old device and be sure to reset your factory settings.

Finally, make sure all of the passwords are different for each of your accounts and use a 12+ character passphrase. Right now, threat actors are after credentials more than in years past. You should have a different password for each account and use multifactor authentication if possible for an added layer of security. If you follow these steps, you will be enacting different ways to prevent identity theft. 

Contact the ITRC

If you have questions about tidying up your identity and ways to prevent identity theft, or if you believe you are a victim, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center. You can reach an expert advisor toll-free by phone (888.400.5530) or live-chat. You can also find resources on an array of identity-related topics. Just go to www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.

The post was originally published on 2/15/19 and was updated on 4/6/21

  • In 2020, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) received nearly 100,000 business or personal loan fraud reports, many of them related to Small Business Administration (SBA) loan identity fraud.
  • That’s more than double the number of loan fraud reports from a year earlier. The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has also seen a spike in SBA loan identity crime reports since the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Identity thieves apply for SBA loans (primarily Economic Injury Disaster (EIDL) and Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans) using stolen Social Security numbers and business Employer Identification numbers (EINs).
  • Scammers are also targeting consumers through phishing schemes in an attempt to steal their Social Security Numbers and other personal information needed to commit SBA loan identity fraud.
  • If anyone believes they are the victim of an SBA loan identity crime or would like to learn how to protect themselves from becoming a victim, they can contact the ITRC to speak with an advisor toll-free at 888.400.5530 or via live-chat. Just go to www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.

Small Business Administration (SBA) loan identity fraud spiked in 2020 due to COVID-19, and it continues to be a growing issue in 2021. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) says in 2019, they received 43,920 reports of fraud involving business or personal loans; the number more than doubled in 2020 as the FTC had 99,650 reports. The FTC acknowledges that not all of the reports are related to SBA loan identity fraud, but also notes many of them are.

The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has seen a spike in calls and live-chats around SBA loan-related identity theft. The contacts continue today as contact center advisors work to help victims. Here is a testimonial from one victim who turned to the ITRC regarding their SBA loan identity crime case:

“I want to thank you for all your suggestions. You are the third (organization) I have contacted and by far the most helpful. I received a form from the Small Business Administration, and after returning it with the police report and the Identity Theft Report, I was informed that my debt with them would be canceled. It is such a huge weight off me. I did everything you suggested, and our credit is frozen with all the CRA’s. Thank you again.”

There are different forms of SBA loan-related identity theft of which  businesses and consumers should be aware:

Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs)

Economic Injury Disaster (EIDL) loans, loans for businesses that suffer substantial economic injury located within a disaster area, have always been available through the SBA. However, they have been expanded as part of the CARES Act to provide relief to businesses experiencing financial loss due to COVID-19. Identity fraud from an EIDL loan occurs when a threat actor applies for an EIDL loan using either a consumer’s Social Security Number (SSN) or a business’s Employer Identification Number (EIN).

Paycheck Protection Program Loans (PPPs)

Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans were designed to help businesses maintain their payroll and keep their workforce during COVID-19, and they are available through a lender. Identity fraud from a PPP loan occurs when an identity thief applies for a PPP loan using a stolen SSN, a business EIN or other stolen personal information needed to obtain a loan.

What to do if You Are a Victim of SBA Loan Identity Fraud

If a consumer or a business is the victim of an SBA loan identity crime (whether it’s from either an EIDL or PPP loan), they should take the following steps:

  1. Go back to the source of the loan to notify them of the identity fraud. If the identity fraud is from an EIDL loan, the victim should contact the SBA. If the fraud involves a PPP loan, the affected party should contact the lender that issued the loan. See below for more information on what the SBA requires people to submit, where to submit it, and details on their process.
  2. File an Identity Theft Report with the FTC at www.IdentityTheft.gov. An Identity Theft Report is one of the required documents by the SBA to cancel the loan debt as quickly as possible. Other documents needed include photo identification issued by a federal or state agency and a completed and signed Declaration of Identity Theft. For more information on the steps required by the SBA, click here.
  3. Place a credit freeze to lock credit files until they are needed.A credit freeze is the most effective way to ensure new loans or accounts are not opened.
  4. A less effective option is to place a fraud alert on credit files to alert potential creditors to take extra precautions before extending credit.
  5. Verify with the Secretary of State’s Office or another government agency where the business is registered to ensure the company’s ownership and registration status have not been changed.

Contact the ITRC

Anyone who believes they are a victim of SBA loan identity fraud should contact the ITRC for more information. People can speak to an advisor by phone (888.400.5530) or by live-chat to develop a resolution plan. Anyone who wants to document their steps can use the ITRC’s ID Theft Help app’s case log feature. Consumers who want to learn more can also check out our latest education resources at www.idtheftcenter.org.

While people continue to take protective measures in order to avoid COVID-19, some groups are actively working harder. It’s not just the essential workers, healthcare workers or first responders. Unfortunately, scammers are also putting in overtime to take advantage of the current situation.

Recent reports of quarantine-based scams have included unemployment benefits identity theft, IRS stimulus check scams, and now dating app scams and COVID-19 romance scams. While these have always been a known threat, newsworthy events like the COVID-19 pandemic often lead to an increase in scam activity. Scammers are increasing the amount of romance scams with more people on dating apps due to isolation. Also, scammers are changing their stories to include COVID-19. Fortunately, while the other virus-related scams may be hard to spot due to the fact that they are based on actual current events, avoiding a COVID-19 romance scam might be a little bit easier.

It is important that consumers know the signs:

  1. A plausible reason why the person is reaching out to strangers. Even before the virus, the reason usually had to do with boredom and isolation, which are abundant right now.
  2. A job or location that prevents them from communicating on a regular basis. Again, before the virus, those jobs often included occupations like off-shore oil rig worker, deep-sea fishing boat captain or deployed soldier. Due to COVID-19, it is just as easy to blame the virus, especially if the person claims to be a hospital worker, medic or another essential employee.
  3. A sympathetic story. While a lonely, deployed soldier story is prone to tug at the victim’s heartstrings, an EMT, nurse or doctor who just needs someone to talk to as they attempt to process the horrors of frontline medical work could be viewed as a more sympathetic story.
  4. The request for money. The sympathy mentioned above goes directly into the request for funds. Right now there are probably a lot of people who would help a nurse or medic purchase masks and gloves, and who has not heard the reports of price gouging and scarcity. If the scammer poses as an out-of-work employee, a victim might help a single parent buy groceries for their child.
  5. The cat-and-mouse game. Romance scams are a vicious cycle of flattery and compliments combined with plausible requests for money. Following through with the money earns the victim even more of the attention they crave. Hesitating or refusing earns them the silent treatment.

In order for consumers to protect themselves from COVID-19 romance scams and other scams, consumers have to be aware of the threat and spot the telltale signs. Romance scams rely on a formulaic model, namely an individual who reaches out on social media, via text message or some other electronic method. They begin a lengthy, personal conversation, one that contains an extremely high, frequent amount of discussion. Within days, they begin making statements such as, “I’ve never felt this way about anyone,” or “I know this is sudden, but I can really see us having a future together.”

Within a short period of “grooming” the victim with promises of visits and even marriage, the story crops up. One example could be a story about a terrible incident that has occurred and the scammer even has the funds to fix it, but they cannot access their money in time to fix the issue. The scammer may ask the victim to pay the money with the promise that they will be paid back immediately. From there, more requests for money could follow, even as the scammer continues to string along victims with promises of long-term relationships.

Remember, there is no plausible excuse why someone would need to reach out for money from someone they have not met in person. People should protect themselves from these and other scams by learning to spot the warning signs and distancing themselves if any red flags appear. If anyone believes they are a victim of a COVID-19 romance scam, they can contact the Identity Theft Resource Center to live chat with an expert advisor. If they do not have internet access, they can call toll-free at 888.400.5530. 

In fact, of the 1,255 total data breaches recorded by the Identity Theft Resource Center in 2018, 150 of were because of the mismanagement of information by employees tasked with protecting it. That means 12% of the data breaches were the direct result of mistakes in handling sensitive information, leading to 1,131,288 records exposed and potentially costly consequences for the companies involved.

April is Records and Information Management Month, and while it might not conjure up holiday-themed festive images the same way Christmas does, it is a great reminder that your information and your identity are only as safe as the people who have their hands on it.

What does it mean to mishandle information? There are numerous ways that information can accidentally fall into the wrong hands. It may be losing a flash drive or laptop with customer records on it, the theft of company hardware like laptops or even servers, reusing a weak password that lets hackers easily break into a system or failing to password protect a database of records in the first place. In other cases, the exposure resulted from improper disposal of sensitive information, such as throwing paper records in an unsecured garbage dumpster instead of shredding. In many cases, employees may fall for phishing attempts or respond to requests that appear to come from someone within the company but are actually sent by malicious imposters.

In order to protect all of the sensitive information that businesses gather and store, it is important to understand how to secure it and what can happen if it is compromised. It often starts with a solid company-wide computer use policy that outlines exactly how things like password security, email responses and data access are supposed to be enforced. Helping every employee understand the ramifications of mishandling information is important, too. Finally, a good “delete” housekeeping from time to time to permanently destroy any outdated stored records can thwart a lot of security problems before they arise.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC

Read next: TurboTax Breach Cause By Credential Stuffing

SAN DIEGO – Jan 28, 2019 – The Identity Theft Resource Center®, a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity crime, and CyberScout®, a full-spectrum identity, privacy and data security services firm, released the 2018 End-of-Year Data Breach Report.

According to the report, the number of U.S. data breaches tracked in 2018 decreased from last year’s all-time high of 1,632 breaches by 23 percent (or 1,244 breaches), but the reported number of consumer records exposed containing sensitive personally identifiable information jumped 126 percent from the 197,612,748 records exposed in 2017 to 446,515,334 records this past year.

“The increased exposure of sensitive consumer data is serious,” said Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center. “Never has there been more information out there putting consumers in harm’s way. ITRC continues to help victims and consumers by providing guidance on the best ways to navigate the dangers of identity theft to which these exposures give rise.”

Another critical finding was the number of non-sensitive records compromised, not included in the above totals, an additional 1.68 billion exposed records. While email-related credentials are not considered sensitive personally identifiable information, a majority of consumers use the same username/email and password combinations across multiple platforms creating serious vulnerability.

“When it comes to cyber hygiene, email continues to be the Achilles Heel for the average consumer,” said CyberScout founder and chair, Adam Levin. “There are many strategies consumers can use to minimize their exposure, but the takeaway from this year’s report is clear: Breaches are the third certainty in life, and constant vigilance is the only solution.”
To download the 2018 End-of-Year Data Breach Report, visit: idtheftcenter.org/2018-end-of-year-data-breach-report/

###

About the Identity Theft Resource Center:

Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity theft in resolving their cases, and to broaden public education and awareness in the understanding of identity theft, data breaches, cybersecurity, scams/fraud, and privacy issues. Through public and private support, the ITRC provides no-cost victim assistance and consumer education through its call center, website, social media channels, live chat feature and ID Theft Help. For more information, visit: http://www.idtheftcenter.org

About CyberScout:
Since 2003, CyberScout® has set the standard for full-spectrum identity, privacy and data security services, offering proactive protection, employee benefits, education, resolution, identity management and consulting as well as breach preparedness and response programs.

CyberScout products and services are offered globally by 660 client partners to more than 17.5 million households worldwide, and CyberScout is the designated identity theft services provider for more than 750,000 businesses through cyber insurance policies. CyberScout combines extensive experience with high-touch service to help individuals, government, nonprofit and commercial clients minimize risk and maximize recovery.

###

Identity Theft Resource Center
Charity Lacey
VP of Communications
O: 858-634-6390
C: 619-368-4373
clacey@idtheftcenter.org

CyberScout
Lelani Clark
VP of Communications
O: 646-649-5766
C: 347-204-9297
lelani@adamlevin.com