• The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) teams have seen an uptick in subscription renewal scams as a way of stealing your identity. Criminals send emails about auto-renewals for subscriptions in hopes you will click on a malicious link.
  • Identity criminals are after your personal information so they can use it to commit different forms of identity theft and identity fraud.
  • To avoid a subscription renewal scam, ignore any messages about auto-renewals claiming to be from a company where you don’t have a subscription. If it appears to be from a company where you do have a subscription, check the sender’s email address to ensure it’s from the correct company.
  • Don’t click on any links until you confirm the email is legitimate. If the email is a spoof, report it as spam, block the sender and delete the email.
  • To learn more, or if you believe you have received subscription renewal scams, contact the ITRC. Call toll-free by phone (888.400.5530) or live-chat at www.idtheftcenter.org to speak with an expert advisor.

Subscription renewal scams aren’t new. However, ITRC team members have seen a rise in the number of phishing emails claiming it’s time to renew an annual subscription. The phishing attempt pictured below is a subscription renewal scam one ITRC team member received, claiming to be from Geek Squad.

Scammers use emails like these to get you to click on a malicious link and steal your personal information so they can commit identity crimes with it. Many subscription renewal scams look legitimate. It is important you know how to spot one and the steps to stay safe so your sensitive information isn’t compromised.

Who are the Targets?

Text and email users

What is the Scam?

Criminals pose as a recognized company and send texts and emails to people informing them that their annual subscription has been renewed. The phishing emails go on to ask people to click on a link to review the summary details of their renewal. However, the link is malicious and either installs malware on your computer, steals your personal information or takes you to a fake website.

What They Want

Cybercriminals want you to respond to the subscription renewal scams or click on the malicious link in the message so they can steal your personal information. Identity criminals may proceed to use your information to commit an array of identity crimes.

How to Avoid Being Scammed

  • If you receive a text or email about a subscription renewal from a company you do not have a subscription with, ignore it. Don’t click on any links because they could contain malware. If you receive emails you are not expecting, go directly back to the source to see if the message is real.
  • Check the email sender’s address to make sure it is legitimate if you get an email from a company about a subscription renewal with which you have a subscription. If you are still unsure, reach out to the company directly to confirm the validity of the message.
  • If you know the email is a subscription renewal scam, report it as spam, block the sender and delete the email.

Contact the ITRC toll-free by calling 888.400.5530 or using the live-chat function at www.idtheftcenter.org if you’ve received any subscription renewal scams. ITRC expert advisors will help you create a resolution plan with the steps you need to take.

  • Criminals claiming to be with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) are targeting people with emails as taxpayers continue to receive the third round of Economic Impact Payments (EIP) that began in March 2021.
  • Identity criminals send messages claiming you can receive an EIP Payment. They say the IRS is sending payments each week to qualified individuals as they continue to process tax returns.
  • However, messages like these are IRS scams seeking your personal and financial information to commit identity theft and fraud.
  • The IRS will never email, text, call or send a message on social media to anyone. If you receive a message claiming to be from the IRS, ignore it. You are also encouraged to forward it to the IRS at phishing@irs.gov and note that it seems to be a phishing scam seeking your personal information.
  • To learn more, or if you believe you have received IRS scams by email, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) toll-free by phone (888.400.5530) or live-chat at www.idtheftcenter.org to speak with an expert advisor.

The third round of Economic Impact Payments (EIP) from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) began to go out in March 2021. However, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) continues to receive messages about IRS scams by email, like the one below.

According to an official IRS notice, the Service is still sending EIP Payments weekly as 2020 tax returns are processed. Criminals have been striking with scams since the first stimulus package was passed in 2020. While many EIP Payments have been received, you should beware of scams asking for payment to receive compensation and remember that the IRS will never call, message or email anyone.

Who are the Targets?

U.S. Taxpayers

What is the Scam?

In the latest IRS scams by email, identity criminals send emails to inboxes claiming that they are eligible to receive a payment after the last annual calculation of their “fiscal activity.” The email goes on to say that each week the IRS will continue to send the third EIP Payments to eligible individuals as they process tax returns. The phishing emails also include a button to “claim my payment.”

What They Want

Scammers want you to either respond or click on a malicious link so they can steal your personal and financial information to commit different forms of identity crimes, including financial identity theft.

How to Avoid Being Scammed

  • Ignore emails, texts or social media messages claiming to be from the IRS. Do not respond to the messages or click on any links or attachments because they could be malicious. Acting on the IRS scams by email, text or social media could lead to having your information stolen. The IRS will not email or message anyone. Do not share any personal information, including credit card and bank account numbers, except on the official www.IRS.gov website or the representative you contacted by calling the IRS.
  • Ignore calls claiming to be from the IRS. While IRS scams by email continue to circulate, identity criminals could call you, too. If you receive an unsolicited call claiming to be from the IRS, ignore it. The IRS will not call anyone unsolicited, either.
  • Send phishing emails to the IRS. The IRS asks anyone who receives a phony email to forward it to phishing@irs.gov and note that it seems to be a phishing scam seeking your information.
  • Report the identity crime. You can report any identity fraud to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) by visiting www.IdentityTheft.gov.

If you have received IRS scams by email, text message, social media or by phone, you can also contact the ITRC toll-free by calling 888.400.5530 or using the live-chat function at www.idtheftcenter.org. ITRC expert advisors will help you create a resolution plan with the steps you need to take.

  • President Joseph R. Biden signed an executive order extending a pause on student loan payments to January 31, 2022. However, some borrowers are already reporting a rise in student loan forgiveness scams where people pose as loan providers that can help pay off student loans.
  • Identity thieves ask for information like Social Security numbers (SSNs), federal student aid I.D.s, bank account information and credit card information to commit different forms of identity theft and fraud.
  • Some loan forgiveness solicitations are not attempts to steal your information. However, they are designed to steer you into high-cost loan repayment programs with high interest rates or fees.
  • Be skeptical of anyone who calls or emails you offering to pay off your student loans. Call your loan provider to see if the message was legitimate, and do research on the loan provider the caller claims to represent.  
  • If you fall victim to an identity scam, call your bank or credit card provider to stop payments or close your accounts. Also, contact your loan servicer so they can monitor your account. Finally, check your credit report for any suspicious activity and strongly consider freezing your credit.
  • To learn more about student loan forgiveness scams, or to create a resolution plan, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free by phone (888.400.5530) or live-chat on the company website www.idtheftcenter.org.

Student loan forgiveness scams have been around for a long time. However, they have spiked during the COVID-19 pandemic. President Joseph R. Biden recently issued an executive order extending student loan relief until January 31, 2022. While the extension is welcome news to many borrowers, it also means student loan forgiveness scams will continue for the foreseeable future. CNBC reports an uptick in student loan forgiveness scams. The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has also received inquiries about the scams, like the one below:

While the voicemail might not be a scam, people who receive voicemails like these should use caution. The same advice applies to emails received about student loans resuming, especially if the sender claims to be from a loan provider that was not used to take out the loan. COVID-19 has given criminals and unethical loan processors more ways to take advantage of people who have been hurt financially over the last year and a half. It could be a scammer looking to exploit the pause in payments due to COVID-19, and any potential confusion it brings.

Who are the Targets?

Former and current college students who are paying off student loans

What is the Scam?

Identity thieves call or email people with student loans claiming to be a loan provider or the U.S. Department of Education. They offer to reduce and help pay off monthly payments. Scammers ask for all sorts of personally identifiable information (PII) over the phone so that they can commit different forms of identity crimes like account takeover.

However, not all of the unsolicited student loan calls and emails are identity scams. Some are reported to be attempts to steer borrowers into repayment programs with high fees and high interest rates.

What They Want

Criminals ask for PII like Social Security numbers (SSNs), federal student aid I.D.s, credit card information and bank account information to commit identity theft. Unethical loan processors attempt to enroll borrowers in high-cost loan repayment programs.

How to Avoid Being Scammed

  • To avoid student loan forgiveness scams, be skeptical of anyone who calls you to help you pay off your student loans. Google the name of the loan provider the caller claims to be working for and see if there are any complaints. Also, if you have any doubts, contact your loan provider directly about the inquiry.
  • Look for the name of the program that is being offered to you. CNBC says, in some scams, criminals have claimed they are part of “Biden loan forgiveness” or “CARES Act loan forgiveness,” two programs that do not exist.
  • If you receive an email about student loan forgiveness, check the sender’s email address to make sure the email is coming from an address that ends in .gov.
  • If you provide a scammer with bank account or credit card information, call your bank or credit card provider to stop the payments immediately, and close your accounts if needed. It’s also a good idea to contact your student loan servicer, especially if you provided information such as your federal student aid I.D., so they can monitor your account, and check your credit report for suspicious activity. The ITRC strongly recommends you also freeze your credit.
  • Finally, report the student loan forgiveness scams to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) at www.IdentityTheft.gov.

To learn more about student loan forgiveness scams, or if you believe you were the victim of a scam, contact the ITRC toll-free by calling 888.400.5530. You can also visit the company website to live-chat with an expert advisor. Go to www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.  

  • E-signature scams are rising as remote workers rely more on services like DocuSign, HelloSign and other similar services. Recently, some employees at the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) received phishing emails that claimed to have an invoice to sign that was attached to the email.  
  • Other e-signature email scams ask people to enter their personal and financial information, claiming that they either have a notification or their account was suspended.  
  • These e-signature scams and phishing attacks can lead to malware and stolen personal and financial data used to commit different forms of identity crimes.  
  • To avoid these scams, you should ignore any emails you are not expecting, never click on any unknown links and reach out directly to the person the email claims to come from to verify the validity of the message.  
  • If anyone believes they are a victim of an e-signature scam or wants to learn more, they can contact the ITRC toll-free by phone (888.400.5530) or live-chat. Just go to www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.  

DocuSign and similar services that offer verified electronic signatures have grown in popularity since COVID-19. According to one e-signature company’s recent financial report, their total revenue has increased by more than 50 percent. It’s no surprise more people need the services of an e-signature company. It is also no surprise that e-signature scams are spiking as a result. Multiple Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) employees recently received emails claiming to be from DocuSign with “invoices” attached: 

While convenient, e-signature services give threat actors another way to steal identities and financial and personal data. Consumers should keep an eye out for e-signature email scams so they don’t fall victim to a phishing attack.  

Who are the Targets? 

DocuSign users; Email users; Employees 

What is the Scam? 

In the latest e-signature scams, criminals send phishing emails claiming to come from “DocuSign Electronic Service.” The subject line typically tells users they received an invoice or notification from a service – DocuSign Electronic Service – for example. The emails contain malicious attachments that could lead to malware. Other e-signature scams tell people that they have a notification or their account is suspended and to click on a link and enter their personal and financial information. 

What They Want 

Criminals commit malware attacks and steal people’s personal and financial information to execute an array of identity crimes. They use the information to access people’s bank accounts, credit card accounts and work accounts, or they sell the personal information to other criminals. 

How to Avoid Being Scammed 

  • If you have not been requested to sign any documents, be wary of an email asking you to sign something. It is probably a phishing attack. 
  • Look for misspellings in the email. Sometimes scammers will alter a letter in the sender’s email address, hoping you do not notice. For example, if it is a DocuSign email scam, the sender address may be “@docsgn.com” instead of “@docusign.com.” 
  • Always check the sender’s email. If the email comes from an address or name you do not recognize, ignore it. If it claims to be from someone you work with, contact that person directly and ask them if they sent you the document. 
  • Never click on any links in an email you are not expecting. Instead, contact the source of the email directly to verify the validity of the email. 
  • If you’ve receive a phishing email, report it. You can report it to the Federal Trade Commission at www.ftc.gov/complaint.  

To learn more about e-signature scams, or if you believe you were the victim of an e-signature email scam, contact the ITRC toll-free by calling 888.400.5530. You can also visit the company website to live-chat with an expert advisor. Go to www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.   

  • A new Google Photo sharing scam is the latest attempt to steal your credentials to hack and access your accounts.
  • You receive a message claiming to be from Google Photo that says someone is sharing a photo album with you. You’re asked to log into your account, except the message isn’t real, and the criminals take off with your Google credentials.
  • If you receive a message you are not expecting or from someone you don’t know, don’t click on any link in the message.
  • If you want to learn more about the Google Photo sharing scam or if you are a victim, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat. Just visit www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.

Scammers always try to find different ways to attack consumers. One new attempt is through a text or email that appears to come from Google Photo. The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) recently received a suspicious message that appeared to be a legitimate attempt to share a Google Photo album. However, it was actually a phishing scam.

Like many phishing attacks, the Google Photo sharing scam is an attempt to steal your credentials. The tactic has become more common with cybercriminals shifting away from attacks seeking consumer information and towards attacks that target logins and passwords. 

Who is the Target?

Text message users; email users

What is the Scam?

You receive what appears to be a real attempt to share a Google Photo album. The message claims that someone has shared a photo album with you. However, there is no photo album. Once you click the “View Photo” link, you are prompted to another website to log into your Google account. Since the website captures the login information, you then provide the identity thieves with access to your credentials and account.

What They Want

It’s always easier to steal something when you have the key to a lock instead of having to break into where valuables are kept. Identity criminals want to access personal and work accounts because that’s easier and faster than trying to break into a system. The Google Photo sharing scam is a way for identity criminals to get the credentials needed to access and steal personal and company information. According to the FBI, email compromises cost U.S. businesses $1.8 billion, and phishing schemes cost individuals $54 million in 2020.

How to Avoid Being Scammed

  • Never click on a link in a suspicious or unexpected message. While the message might look legitimate, the links and attachments could still have malware. Instead, if the message comes from a “company,” reach out to the company directly to verify whether the message is real. If it comes from an unknown person, delete the message without clicking any links.
  • Check the URL link and be on the lookout for short links. Sometimes, there are signs in the link that give away it is a scam. For example, a link address might read “Goo.gle” instead of “Google.” You are more likely to see that when a link is shortened, a favorite tactic of cybercriminals. Another tactic is typing out a hyperlinked text to what looks like a legitimate website (like Google.com). However, it actually displays an unknown site when you hover over the link.
  • Use Multifactor Authentication (MFA) on important accounts. Even trained cybersecurity professionals fall for sophisticated phishing attempts that look real. That’s why it’s important to use MFA on any account that offers the feature. Use an authenticator app when possible – Microsoft and Google offer them for free – because they are more secure than just having a code texted to your mobile device. With MFA in place, having your login and password won’t help a criminal access your protected accounts.
  • Never reuse or share passwords. Criminals steal logins and passwords because they know most people use the same password on multiple accounts. Too many people also use the same passwords at home and work. Make sure each account has a unique password that is at least 12 characters long.

If you believe you are a victim of a Google Photo sharing scam or would like to learn more, contact the ITRC toll-free. You can call (888.400.5530) or use the live-chat function on the company website. Just go to www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.   

  • An Internal Revenue Service (IRS) text scam is circulating to get consumers’ personal information, which may put them at further risk of tax identity crimes. 
  • According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), imposter scams were the top reported fraud in 2020. The FTC had approximately 500,000 reports of the scam, leading to an estimated $1.2 billion in lost funds.  
  • People may receive text messages from their tax service but will never get a text message directly from the IRS. (People should still independently check with their filing service because scammers may also spoof tax filing entities.
  • If anyone receives a text claiming to be from the IRS, they should ignore it, not click on any links or attachments, forward the text and originating phone number to the IRS at 202.552.1226 and then delete the text message. 
  • For more information on IRS text scams or if someone believes they are a victim of tax identity theft, they can visit www.idtheftcenter.org for resources or speak with an advisor toll-free by phone (888.400.5530) or live-chat. 

IRS Text Scam Pops Up on First Day to File

February 12, 2021, is the first day for people to file their 2020 tax returns, and many consumers may receive an email or notification from their tax service that it is time to file. Scammers are trying to take advantage by posing as IRS agents to exploit tax filers. 

The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has received reports of a new Internal Revenue Service (IRS) text scam that claims “your federal tax return was rejected.” The IRS text scam is designed to get consumers’ personal information, which puts people at additional risk of tax identity theft. Here’s an example of the IRS text scam sent to the ITRC: 

Example of the IRS Text Scam sent to the Identity Theft Resource Center

Government Imposter Scams Continue to Spread 

The IRS text scam is not a new tactic for scammers. Government imposter scams were among the top frauds in 2020 reported by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The FTC says that they received nearly 500,000 reports of imposter scams that cost people $1.2 billion, with a median loss of $850. Government and business imposter scams were among the top categories of COVID-19 and stimulus-related reports. 

Cybercriminals Target Tax Season 

Criminals know they can take advantage of tax season by posing as an IRS representative, especially with more Americans likely to receive a Form 1099-G because their state employment office is providing documentation for receipt of unemployment benefits. However, many of those taxpayers may be victims of unemployment benefits fraud because identity thieves received benefits in their name.  

What You Should Do 

The IRS will not text anyone about their tax return. People may receive a text from their tax filer, but never from the IRS. (People should still independently check with their filing service because scammers may also spoof tax filing entities.)  

If anyone gets a text message claiming to be the IRS, they should do the following: 

  1. Do not respond, open any attachments or click on any links. An attachment or a link could contain a malicious code that has the ability to infect someone’s device. 
  1. The IRS asks people to forward the IRS text scam and the originating phone number as-is to  202.552.1226.  
  1. After forwarding the information to the IRS, the original text message should be deleted.  

It is also a good idea to never respond to any unsolicited messages. Instead, consumers should reach out directly to the company or person the message claims to be from to verify the message’s validity. People should also refrain from providing their personal information unless it is necessary or with a trusted organization. 

Contact the ITRC 

Anyone who believes they are the victim of an IRS text scam, tax identity theft, or wants to learn more can visit the ITRC website for additional resources. They can also contact an advisor toll-free by phone (888.400.5530) or by live-chat. All people have to do is visit www.idtheftcenter.org to get started. 

*Originally posted December 2015. Updated as of December 14, 2020.

  • Facebook users have recently been receiving messages about winning a “Christmas bonus.” These messages are scams. 
  • The messages come from cloned accounts of one of the user’s real Facebook friends.  
  • If anyone receives a message about a Christmas bonus on Facebook, they should ignore it. If it comes from the Facebook page or someone they know, they should alert them that their Facebook has been hacked or cloned. People should also consider reporting it to Facebook.  
  • If anyone wants to learn more about the Facebook Christmas bonus scam or believes they are a victim, they should contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website. 
One user alerted others and pointed to the ITRC for free assistance

Facebook users have been targeted by scammers offering a “Christmas bonus” or a “Christmas Benefit.” The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has spotted multiple Facebook Christmas bonus scam posts warning others of the scam.      

Who is the Target 

Facebook users; social media profiles

What is the Scam 

Example of Christmas bonus

Facebook users receive messages from individuals in their contact lists about winning a “Christmas bonus.” The messages are coming from the cloned accounts of friends, and they state that the individual has won a Facebook Christmas Bonus Giveaway. The targeted victim is then directed to contact a “Facebook Agent,” who will send a message that the winning is a random contest sponsored by Powerball.

The scammers will then ask for personal information to deliver the winnings. They may also ask for a small “transfer fee” to transfer the money into the victim’s account. Once the victim gives them their money or their personal information, the scammers disappear and do not award the “bonus.” Facebook Christmas bonus scams can use various tactics from scam to scam. However, they all are after the same thing. 

“Christmas Bonus Cash Guarantee” Facebook page targeting vulnerable populations

What They Want 

Personal information or direct payment 

How You Can Avoid Being Scammed 

  • If you receive a Facebook message stating that you have won something, chances are it is a scam. Do not respond.  
  • Delete the message and inform your friend that their Facebook account might be hacked or cloned. 
  • Report the Facebook Christmas bonus scam to Facebook 

If you believe you are a victim of a Facebook Christmas bonus scam or would like to learn more, contact the ITRC Center toll-free. You can call (888.400.5530) or use the live-chat function on the company website. Just go to www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.  

  • A new unsubscribe email scam tries to scare people into “unsubscribing” from confirmation emails coming from an adult dating list.
  • The unsubscribe button could lead to malware or to a form to steal your personal information.
  • Anyone who receives a suspicious email they are not expecting should ignore it and not click on any links, open any attachments, or download any files. Users can also report the email as spam.
  • For more information, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat with an expert advisor on the company website.

Scammers are always looking for new ways to dupe consumers into turning over their personal information or spreading malware to one of their devices. A new unsubscribe email scam reported to the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) tries to trick people into clicking an “unsubscribe button” that could be either a malicious link or a form to steal your personal information.

Who It Is Targeting

Email users

What It Is

A “confirmation” email that claims you received a private message from an adult dating website. The fake email asks the user to confirm by entering their email address and name, and it gives people an option to “unsubscribe” if they would like to stop receiving the adult dating list emails. Scammers use scare tactics such as an email from an adult website in hopes people will click the “unsubscribe” button.

What They Are After

Entering your email address and name into the confirmation email gives cybercriminals the personal information needed to commit identity crimes. Clicking the “unsubscribe” button could lead to malware infecting your device, or to a form that asks for your personal information.

What You Can Do

  • If you receive a suspicious or unexpected message that includes links or asks for your information, ignore it. If it claims to be from a legitimate company, go directly to the source to verify the validity of the message.
  • Do not click on any links, open any attachments, or download any files in an email or text unless you confirm it is legitimate.
  • Use your email provider’s “spam” feature to report the email as junk rather than clicking unsubscribe.

If you believe you have fallen victim to an unsubscribe email scam or have additional questions, call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat with an expert advisor on the company website.

Classes being moved to virtual and students being off of campus is not stopping scammers from targeting students. According to the Federal Trade Commission, a recent college student stimulus check scam claims to be from universities’ financial departments. However, it’s a trap to steal sensitive information and install malware on students’ devices.

Who is it targeting: College students

What it Is: Phishing scam that steals information, potentially installs malware

What Are They After: This recent email scam is disguised as a message from the victim’s university’s “financial department” regarding their COVID-19 economic stimulus check. The email claims it needs to be opened from a portal using a university login. If a student logs in with their university account, they could give away their login credentials and potentially download malware to their device.

How You Can Avoid It:

  • Investigate – If you are suspicious of an email, contact the sender directly to verify that they are legitimate. Look up their phone number or website yourself. Do not click on any links.
  • Pay attention to detail- Bad grammar and spelling can be a way to spot a phishing email. Another clue that the email is not from your school is if they use the wrong department name (calling themselves the Financial Department rather than the Financial Aid Department).

If a student thinks they may have been targeted by a stimulus check scam, they can live-chat with an Identity Theft Resource Center expert advisor. They can also call for toll-free, no-cost assistance at 888.400.5530. For full details on the college student stimulus check scam, consumers can check out this article from the FTC.


You might also like…

Contact Tracing Scams Ramp Up as New Technology Evolves Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Possible Nigerian Fraud Ring to Blame for Unemployment Identity Theft Attack

Five State Unemployment Department Data Exposures Uncover System Flaws

A long-time scam tactic has made a comeback amid the coronavirus pandemic. COVID-19 catfishing scams are out in full force in an attempt to play on people’s emotions and steal their personally identifiable information to commit fraud.

Who Is It Targeting: Social media and dating app users

What Is It: A scam where someone creates a fake social media profile to target victims for financial donations or sensitive personal information used for identity theft.

What Are They After: Scammers are stealing photos of frontline workers to lure in victims to give money to a fake charity, or to steal their personal information to commit fraud. As reported by NBC, one student nurse had to report a fake Facebook page over 400 times as it was soliciting illegitimate coronavirus donations.

Despite an increase in awareness of similar scams, fake accounts are becoming more common. In the FBI’s 2019 Internet Crime Report, there were 1,000 more reports of confidence fraud and romance cybercrimes compared to 2018. Those statistics are an example of why so many people might be getting targeted by COVID-19 catfishing scams.

How Can You Avoid It:

  • Research the person the profile claims to be
  • If someone refuses to meet in person, it is probably a scam
  • Never give money or personal information to someone who will not meet in person
  • Consider making all social media profiles private and report any abuse to the appropriate platform

If someone believes they are a victim of a COVID-19 catfishing scam or find a picture of themselves on a fake profile, they can live-chat with an Identity Theft Resource Center advisor. They can also call toll-free at 888.400.5530.


You might also like…

CAM4 DATA EXPOSURE LEAKS BILLIONS OF RECORDS FROM ADULT STREAMING WEBSITE

THIRD CHEGG DATA BREACH IN THREE YEARS IMPACTS NEARLY 700 EMPLOYEES

BILL & MELINDA GATES FOUNDATION, CDC, NIH AND WHO EMPLOYEE INFORMATION EXPOSED