State and local governments around the country are working hard on plans, and in some cases, starting to execute, to carefully reopen their communities and businesses in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Data is being tracked; task forces are mobilizing and planning; and the “new normal” is beginning to take shape. However, this could lead to an increase in reopening job scams.

More jobs could be a welcomed sight for over 40 million U.S. workers who have had to file for unemployment benefits since mid-March. Some consumers expect to return to their old jobs. However, many others will be looking for a new one.

According to a survey issued by FlexJobs, 19 percent of respondents reported that they have already been victimized by an employment scam. The company further stated that for every legitimate work-from-home job—a highly sought-after option during the pandemic—there are between sixty and seventy scam offers. Out of concern for consumers, as they seek employment, the FBI is warning the public about reopening job scams or fake job offers that would ordinarily raise some red flags if not for the specific changes that quarantine has required.

The FBI says they have seen an uptick in fake job and hiring scams with cybercriminals posing as legitimate employers by spoofing company websites and posting fake job openings on popular online job boards. One of the scams involves fraudsters going as far as conducting false interviews with applicants, then requesting personal information or money that could be transferred to a private location. The Better Business Bureau told FOX 13 in Memphis that fraudsters are using the COVID-19 pandemic in their employment scams to make them more believable.

Fortunately, much of the same caution that applied to job-seeking before COVID-19 still applies. Consumers should know the source of the job listing and only use reputable websites to find employment opportunities. To avoid a reopening job scam, consumers should also be mindful of unsolicited emails and offers with outrageous claims—such as, “Earn $3,000 a week working from home.”

Once a job posting is found, consumers should also be careful about how much personal data they share, at least during the application period. If a company claims they want to do a phone, Skype or Zoom interview due to social distancing and safety, that’s okay. However, it does not mean candidates should turn over information like their Social Security numbers until they have been hired.

Finally, to avoid a job reopening scam, consumers should remember that legitimate jobs don’t usually require any upfront fees or costs. Even things like company uniforms or specialized equipment such as steel-toed shoes are often deducted from the first paycheck or purchased by the employee through an outside company. Typically, they are not charged in the form of a payment. If an employer asks for a finder’s fee, administrative fee, background check fee or any other funds, it is probably a reopening job scam. Even for legitimate actions like submitting a bank account number and routing number for direct depositing of paychecks, it’s important to be sure the company is legitimate and the job has already been awarded before submitting the information. If someone believes they are victim to a COVID-19 reopening job scam, they can live-chat with an Identity Theft Resource Center expert advisor. They can also call toll-free at 888.400.5530.


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