As news of a COVID-19 outbreak continues to grow, companies large and small are requiring more employees to work from home in an effort to create social distance. However, that is leading to an increase in the risk of COVID-19-related cyberattacks.

Potential Risks of Teleworking: Higher Rates of Phishing/Cyberattacks

With more than 10,000 breaches tracked since 2005, the Identity Theft Resource Center anticipates a rise in the cyberattacks on business infrastructure as more of their employees potentially work remotely from home. In 2019 alone, “hacking” accounted for 39 percent of all breaches.

Working Remotely Cybersecurity Tips

While people are working remotely, especially during an event like the COVID-19 outbreak, it is critical they follow the same security policies at home that they would at work.

1. Update all of your software including the operating system (Ex: Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome) & applications; turn-on “auto-update” if you have not already

Hackers use known flaws that have not been fixed to break into business networks and home accounts. Keeping software updated prevents many attacks.

2. Add a stronger passphrase to your home Wi-Fi & wired networks

Many home wireless routers (and other Internet of Things or IoT devices) have easy-to-guess default passwords. Update them to stronger passwords, or use an even stronger passphrase (see below).

3. Update account passwords to a passphrase of at least 10 characters and give each account a unique passphrase you can remember

Gone are the days of changing our password every 30 days and Us1ng a C0mP1ex set of characters as your password. Current recommendations are to use a memorable phrase that you can easily remember – like a book title or movie quote.

4. Keep your work passwords and personal passwords separate to limit the potential of “credential stuffing attacks”  

Hackers use stolen passwords from data breaches to break into computer systems because they know the vast majority of people reuse the same passwords for both work and home accounts. Using the same password for your work accounts as your personal accounts could translate into fraudsters gaining access to one from the other.

5. Do not click on any email, attachment, text, social media post or weblink unless you know the source is real

Phishing attacks are not just for email anymore. And, hackers use near-flawless copies of real materials to fool people into clicking on the fake, but dangerous links or attachments.

6. Check websites and email addresses thoroughly to ensure it is the actual address of the company who sent it

The best way to avoid a phishing attempt is to verify the web or email address to make sure it comes from a legitimate company.

7. If anyone asks for personal data related to COVID-19, it is probably a scam

Scam artists take advantage of vulnerable people during times of crisis and they are using the current COVID-19 pandemic to get the attention of people online and on the phone. Never give personal information to any person or organization that contacts you unsolicited. 

ITRC is Available for Questions & Assistance

The Identity Theft Resource Center, based in San Diego, is operating at limited-capacity during the COVID-19 outbreak to ensure the health and safety of our staff, their families and the community. The ITRC will continue to assist individuals across the country who are victims of identity crime, data breaches and identity-based scams, including COVID-19-related scams. We are here for individuals and businesses who may have questions or need assistance with these scams. You can reach one of our expert advisors via our website Live Chat, toll-free phone number (888.400.5530) and email (itrc@idtheftcenter.org).


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