• A new cybersecurity executive order will lead to the creation of a Cyber Safety Review Board, removing barriers to sharing threat information and much more.
  • The Cyber Safety Review Board will determine how cybercriminals were able to infiltrate the SolarWinds software used by key government agencies and nearly every Fortune 500 company, and will meet anytime there is a significant event. Also, federal agencies will eliminate legal barriers that prevent the sharing of information about data and security breaches.
  • Since the same companies that sell technology to the government also sell products to consumers and businesses, the level of quality and security will rise for every use and everyone.
  • To learn about recent data breaches, consumers and businesses should visit the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC) new data breach tracking tool, notified.
  • For more information, or if someone believes they are the victim of identity theft, consumers can contact the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 or via live-chat on the company website www.idtheftcenter.org. coming in June, you can talk after-hours, weekends and on holidays with our new automated chatbot, ViViAN.

Come What May

Welcome to the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC) Weekly Breach Breakdownfor May 28, 2021. Each week, we look at the most recent and interesting events and trends related to data security and privacy. This week, we will focus on something unusual – a new cybersecurity executive order and solutions to the seemingly endless race against cybercriminals.

In Macbeth, Shakespeare wrote: “Come what come may, time and the hour runs through the roughest day.” Without question, the last six months have been rough on companies, governments and individuals as identity scams and cyberattacks have captured headlines and disrupted lives.

Changes to How the Federal Government Approaches Cybersecurity

From companies most people have never heard of like SolarWinds and Accellion to household names like Microsoft and Peloton, along with critical infrastructure organizations like Colonial Pipeline and the respected Scripps Health system, organizations and institutions alike have been on the wrong side of data and security breaches.

However, federal officials have announced a series of actions that privacy and cybersecurity experts are praising as both needed and welcome changes to how the federal government approaches cybersecurity. Because the U.S. government purchases billions of dollars in IT products and services each year, the private sector, including individual consumers, will also benefit.

Top Provisions in New Cybersecurity Executive Order

There are seven key actions in the new Executive Order on Improving the Nation’s Cybersecurity. We don’t have time to go into all seven, so let’s focus on two of the most important provisions:

  1. Establishing a Cyber Safety Review Board; and,
  2. Removing barriers to sharing threat information.

The best news is, we already have a model in other areas that we know works. Here’s what we mean. Southwest Airlines flight 1380 was climbing through 32,000 feet on the morning of April 17, 2018. At approximately 11:03 a.m., fan blade No. 13 in the left engine shattered due to a previously undetected stress fracture. A 12-inch section weighing 6.825 pounds and a two-inch section of a fan blade weighing .650 pounds separated from the rest of the fan blade assembly. The result was an uncontained failure of the jet engine.

We know all of this because the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) publishes its findings so the public and industry can benefit from the knowledge gained in accident investigations. This decades-old information-sharing model has resulted in the safest form of transportation on the planet. According to the National Safety Council, the odds in 2019 of you dying while walking were one in 543. Dying in a plane crash? So low as to not be measurable.

What are the odds of a company suffering a cyberattack? It’s not a matter of “if,” but how many times, how frequently and if the attack succeeds. A 2017 study by the University of Maryland claims an attack occurs every 39 seconds. Yet, despite the near-constant level of cyber threats, there is no NTSB-style body to find and share the root causes of cyber incursions and the ways to prevent future attacks.

What the New Cybersecurity Executive Order Means

Due to the new cybersecurity executive order, federal agencies have been instructed to find the legal barriers that prevent the sharing of information about data and security breaches and get rid of them. The Homeland Security Secretary is to form a panel of public and private sector experts to determine how cybercriminals were able to infiltrate the SolarWinds software used by key government agencies and nearly every Fortune 500 company. The group is to convene anytime there is a significant cyber event, just like the NTSB.

Later in the year, federal agencies and the companies that sell them hardware and software will have to adopt strict new quality control standards. Because the same companies that sell technology to Uncle Sam also sell products to consumers and businesses, the overall level of quality and security will rise for every use and everyone.

Contact the ITRC

If anyone has questions about keeping their personal information secure, they can visit www.idtheftcenter.org, where they will find helpful tips. People can also sign-up to receive our regular email updates on identity scams and compromises and download our latest report on how identity crimes impact individuals.

If someone thinks they have been the victim of an identity crime or a data breach and needs help figuring out what to do next, they should contact us. Victims can speak with an expert advisor on the phone, chat live on the web or exchange emails during our normal business hours (6 a.m.-5 p.m. PST). And coming in June, people can talk after-hours, weekends and on holidays with our new automated chatbot, ViViAN. Just visit www.idtheftcenter.org to get started. 

Be sure to check out our sister podcast, The Fraudian Slip. We will be back next week with another episode of the Weekly Breach Breakdown.