New Year's resolutions

The holidays have past and a new year is upon us. With that, New Year’s resolutions are beginning to surface. Some resolutions might include going to the gym every day, spending less time on social media or creating a budget you can actually stick to next year. While some of those resolutions might be more realistic than others, there are some practical resolutions you can make that will be even more beneficial. And it’s all based on protecting your identity… In 2019, the Identity Theft Resource Center saw the number of data breaches reported continue to rise. In fact, the ITRC has now recorded over 10,000 data breaches since 2005, hitting the mark this past calendar year. 2019 also saw the announcement of large-scale data breaches like Capital One and healthcare providers and insurance companies continue to be one of the hardest-hit targets, thanks to the overwhelming amount of personally identifiable information (PII) they gather. So what is your New Year’s resolution heading into 2020? If you do not have one, or even if you do, consider making some 2020 identity theft New Year’s resolutions to make your personal data as safe as you can. You can protect your privacy through your simple, everyday habits.

Resolution One: Be Aware of What You Post on Social Media and What You Share

If you are connected online through any of the several social media platforms, you need to know how they work and how to keep your information private.

  • Enact practices that include not oversharing information and change your settings to private.
  • Use different passwords for each social media account.
  • Create strong and unique passwords that include two-factor authentication.

Resolution Two: Guard Your Data

One of your 2020 identity theft New Year’s resolutions should include keeping better tabs on your PII. Do not just turn over your Social Security number without asking why they need it and verifying their plans to protect it. A lot of organizations still ask for it simply out of habit. However, your SSN was designed as a tax identification number, and by law is not to be used for everyday identification purposes.

Resolution Three: Know the Latest Scams and Help Others Stay Alert Too

Fraudsters are always trying to find new ways to attack. That is why it is so important for consumers to stay up-to-date on all of the latest scams, fraud attempts and identity theft information. You can check in with the ITRC for the latest information by signing up for the TMI (Too Much Information) Weekly and following the ITRC on Facebook and Twitter. Once you know about the latest threats, you can help spread the word with friends and family.

Resolution Four: Adopt Good Cyber Hygiene Habits

While 2019 was the year of data, 2020 will be the year of privacy. That is one reason why your 2020 identity theft New Year’s resolutions should include good privacy habits. While data breach fatigue is a recognized phenomenon, the flip side is paranoia that makes you want to unplug and go off the grid. Neither is a solution. Rather, the solution is good privacy habits:

Resolution Five: Watch Out Account Hacks from Credential Stuffing

In 2019 we saw numerous data breaches and account hacks from credential stuffing. Disney+ users saw their accounts sold online after hackers were able to infiltrate their accounts and change the passwords to lock users out. Earlier in the year, TurboTax announced a data breach that was caused by credential stuffing. Consumers need to be sure they are consistently changing their usernames and passwords to reduce the risk of credential stuffing and having any accounts hacked. The unfortunate truth is that some identity theft crimes are unpreventable. However, these 2020 identity theft New Year’s resolutions are steps you can take that will reduce your risk of falling victim to identity theft and increase the likelihood of you spotting a problem quickly. The ITRC is always here to help. Call us toll-free at 888.400.5530 or live-chat with one of our advisors.

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