No matter where your spring break plans have taken you, it is important to remember that the security practices you use while at home are even more important when you are on the road. Also, those same good habits that protect you while traveling are just as crucial when you are relaxing at home.

Booking Your Trip and Hotel

No matter when you plan to go, finding affordable travel arrangements can be a minefield of potential scams and fraud. Do not be swayed by flashy sidebar ads or “act now” special offers, as these are rarely a good deal and can lead to identity theft. Of course, old-fashioned scams like bait-and-switch schemes in which your condo does not actually exist or your reservation is not real are still a major threat.

Check Your Tech

Your technology can leave you very vulnerable during an out-of-town getaway. From connecting over unsecured public Wi-Fi to having your device stolen and infiltrated, there are a lot of ways that malicious actors can get their hands on your sensitive information. Make sure you turn off the Wi-Fi on your mobile devices when you do not need it, only go online over a secured, password protected connection and make sure you have passcode protected your phone or tablet. When you are not using your important apps like email and social media, it is a good idea to log out of those too.

Bring the Receipts

Make sure you hang onto receipts while you are out of town. First, it will help you stay money-aware and avoid overspending if you keep tabs each day on how much you have spent. More importantly, you’ will have paper proof to compare to your bank or credit card statement when you get home. If anyone has copied your card and used your information, you will know at a glance.

Activate Alerts from Your Bank

By taking advantage of security tools offered by your financial institution, you can be informed the second any unusual activity occurs with your cards or your account. Card Not Present alerts, for example, will text or email you the moment someone uses your card number online. Some banks will even call if a physical card transaction occurs in a location too far outside your billing zip code. These can help you take immediate action against theft and fraud.

Old School Understanding

Remember, depending on where you travel there are a lot of scams that have been around for decades. You do not want to take extreme action to protect your identity, then fall for something as simple as a common pickpocket. Stay on top of the kinds of threats you are likely to encounter so you can avoid them.

The most important security step you can take happens when you get home. That is the time to post any photos and videos online—not while you are still away—but it is also the time to take inventory of your financial accounts and your identity. It cannot hurt to order one of your three free annual credit reports a few weeks after your trip is over, just to look for suspicious activity. If you begin receiving a higher volume of scam calls and emails, that may also be a sign that something has happened to your security. Check out the available tools to monitor your identity and reach out to the Identity Theft Resource Center for help if necessary.  


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.