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SAN DIEGO – Jan 28, 2019 – The Identity Theft Resource Center®, a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity crime, and CyberScout®, a full-spectrum identity, privacy and data security services firm, released the 2018 End-of-Year Data Breach Report.

According to the report, the number of U.S. data breaches tracked in 2018 decreased from last year’s all-time high of 1,632 breaches by 23 percent (or 1,244 breaches), but the reported number of consumer records exposed containing sensitive personally identifiable information jumped 126 percent from the 197,612,748 records exposed in 2017 to 446,515,334 records this past year.

“The increased exposure of sensitive consumer data is serious,” said Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center. “Never has there been more information out there putting consumers in harm’s way. ITRC continues to help victims and consumers by providing guidance on the best ways to navigate the dangers of identity theft to which these exposures give rise.”

Another critical finding was the number of non-sensitive records compromised, not included in the above totals, an additional 1.68 billion exposed records. While email-related credentials are not considered sensitive personally identifiable information, a majority of consumers use the same username/email and password combinations across multiple platforms creating serious vulnerability.

“When it comes to cyber hygiene, email continues to be the Achilles Heel for the average consumer,” said CyberScout founder and chair, Adam Levin. “There are many strategies consumers can use to minimize their exposure, but the takeaway from this year’s report is clear: Breaches are the third certainty in life, and constant vigilance is the only solution.”
To download the 2018 End-of-Year Data Breach Report, visit: idtheftcenter.org/2018-end-of-year-data-breach-report/

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About the Identity Theft Resource Center:

Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity theft in resolving their cases, and to broaden public education and awareness in the understanding of identity theft, data breaches, cybersecurity, scams/fraud, and privacy issues. Through public and private support, the ITRC provides no-cost victim assistance and consumer education through its call center, website, social media channels, live chat feature and ID Theft Help. For more information, visit: http://www.idtheftcenter.org

About CyberScout:
Since 2003, CyberScout® has set the standard for full-spectrum identity, privacy and data security services, offering proactive protection, employee benefits, education, resolution, identity management and consulting as well as breach preparedness and response programs.

CyberScout products and services are offered globally by 660 client partners to more than 17.5 million households worldwide, and CyberScout is the designated identity theft services provider for more than 750,000 businesses through cyber insurance policies. CyberScout combines extensive experience with high-touch service to help individuals, government, nonprofit and commercial clients minimize risk and maximize recovery.

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Identity Theft Resource Center
Charity Lacey
VP of Communications
O: 858-634-6390
C: 619-368-4373
clacey@idtheftcenter.org
CyberScout

Lelani Clark
VP of Communications
O: 646-649-5766
C: 347-204-9297
lelani@adamlevin.com

There are a lot of ways data breaches can occur; some are accidental, others are the work of “inside job” actors within the company. Some rely on social engineering, like getting you to download a virus to your computer or click a link to a malicious site. Still others are the work of highly-skilled cybercriminals who can infiltrate a network and steal important information.

What all of those have in common, though, is the need to report them to the government. Under certain legal guidelines, companies that experience a data breach can be required to file a notice with the Securities and Exchange Commission upon discovering the breach. If the breach affected the victims’ highly-sensitive personally identifiable information (like Social Security numbers), the company can also be responsible for providing extended protections like credit or identity monitoring.

Chegg, an online tutoring and textbook rental service, discovered a data breach last month, but their investigation showed it had actually begun in April of this year. The company doesn’t have reason to think any sensitive PII or credit card numbers were exposed, so victims should only have to fear for their login credentials.

Why? If you’ve reused your username and password on different accounts, a hacker who accesses one account now has instant access to all of those other accounts as well. So far, the company has stated that the passwords were hashed with encryption, but depending on the type of encryption used, they may still be easily viewable by anyone with the right tools.

Just to be safe, Chegg reset all of its users’ passwords in an effort to prevent any significant damage. As the hackers did manage to access customers’ shipping addresses and email addresses, users should be on the lookout for any upticks in spam email messages, scams or phishing attempts that appear to originate from Chegg or its partners, or other similar tactics.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

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