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  • One of the first changes in 2020 due to COVID-19 was the delay in the regular income tax filing date. Soon after that, millions of out-of-work Americans began to receive enhanced unemployment benefits and special small business loans.
  • Soon after that, cybercriminals began to steal those benefits. The Department of Labor estimates that unemployment fraud could total as much as $26 billion. California alone has seen nearly $2 billion in unemployment benefits fraud.
  • With the 2021 tax filing season quickly approaching, many people will receive a 1099 form alerting them that they must claim income they never received from the benefits they never sought.
  • To learn more, listen to this week’s episode of the Fraudian Slip.
  • People can learn about taking advantage of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) identity protection programs or reporting identity-related issues to the IRS at IRS.gov and clicking on the Identity Theft Protection link at the bottom of the home page.
  • If anyone believes they are a victim of tax identity theft or unemployment benefits fraud, they should contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or live-chat on the company website idtheftcenter.org.

The below is a transcript of our podcast episode with special guest, IRS

Welcome to the Fraudian Slip, the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC) podcast, where we talk about all-things identity compromise, crime and fraud, including the impact identity issues have on people and businesses.

In a typical episode, we would focus on something that has happened or is happening that impacts consumers and businesses. Not today. We are going to talk about what’s about to happen, specifically the 2021 tax filing season.

It’s been nearly a year since the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted virtually every aspect of everyday life. One of the first changes in 2020 was the delay in the traditional income tax filing date. Soon thereafter, millions of out-of-work Americans began to receive enhanced unemployment benefits and special small business loans. Shortly after that, cybercriminals began to steal those benefits. The Department of Labor estimates that unemployment fraud could total as much as $26 billion. California alone has seen nearly $2 billion in unemployment fraud.

Fast forward to today, and the spike in benefits fraud is subsiding. However, a second round of victims may soon emerge. Benefits like unemployment payments are considered income and are taxable. Thousands of the unemployment payments made in 2020 were made in the names of people whose identities were misused – and they didn’t know it. With the 2021 tax filing season quickly approaching, many people will receive a 1099 form alerting them that they must claim income they never received from the benefits they never sought. That is on top of the usual identity-related income tax fraud the IRS sees each year.

We talked with Jim Robnett, the Deputy Chief of the IRS – Criminal Investigation Division, about the following:

Overview

  • Before 2020, the number of false income tax returns linked to identity compromises was already falling. What had the IRS done that was working so well to reduce tax-related identity theft?

Pandemic-Related Tax Issues

  • The most obvious change in terms of taxes in 2020 was moving the filing date. From the IRS perspective, what was 2020 like for you?
  • Anytime there is a mass injection of money into the economy, there is fraud. The IRS played a crucial role in delivering the stimulus checks approved by Congress. What kind of response did you expect from criminals, and what did you see? 
  • We know there has been a massive amount of unemployment fraud, and that has had tax implications for victims. Explain why that is and what taxpayers should do if they suspect or know they are the victim of benefit fraud?
  • What should taxpayers do who get a 1099 form they were not expecting?
  • What about small businesses or entrepreneurs who may discover someone took out an SBA loan or other pandemic benefit in their name?

2021 Tax Issues

  • What should taxpayers do to prepare for 2021?
  • The IRS recently announced the expansion of Identity Protection PINs. That’s going to be a great tool for preventing fraud. Explain how that works and what taxpayers need to do to take advantage of the IP PIN program?

For answers to all of these questions, listen to this week’s episode of The Fraudian Slip Podcast.

Learn More From the IRS

You can learn more about taking advantage of the IRS identity protection programs or reporting identity-related issues to the IRS at IRS.gov and clicking on the Identity Theft Protection link at the bottom of the home page.

Contact the ITRC

You can learn how to protect yourself from identity fraud, crimes and compromises – including the tax-related issues we discussed today, by visiting idtheftcenter.org, where you can also read more about the latest data breach trends.

If you think you are the victim of an identity crime or your identity has been compromised, you can call us, chat live online, send an email or leave a voice mail for an expert advisor to get advice on how to respond. Just visit the website to get started.

  • The IRS and Treasury Department began distributing stimulus payments the last week of 2020. Direct Deposits, paper checks and debit cards will be sent out to some Americans throughout January. No action is required by anyone to receive their stimulus payment.  
  • Some Americans say they are missing their stimulus payment, while others claim their money was deposited into the wrong bank account. 
  • According to a notice shared with the Identity Theft Resource Center, Turbo Tax recently pointed to an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) error that led to millions of stimulus payments sent to the wrong bank accounts. Turbo Tax expects the issue to be resolved within days.  
  • The IRS says people should visit IRS.gov for the most current information on the second round of Economic Impact Payments rather than calling the agency or their financial institutions or tax software providers. 

Many Americans continue to wait for their stimulus payment, approved as part of the second stimulus package passed by Congress in December 2020. Others claim they are missing their stimulus payment because it was deposited into the wrong bank account. The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) continues to receive calls and live-chats regarding missing stimulus payments. One person reported to the ITRC that they received a message from Turbo Tax claiming millions of stimulus payments were sent to the wrong bank accounts. 

Image provided to ITRC

The message goes on to say the IRS expects the issue will be resolved soon, and stimulus payments will be deposited into the correct bank accounts within days. The Detroit Free Press also reports some taxpayers believe their money is going into the wrong bank accounts. Others say checks are being mailed to them when they received a direct deposit during the first round of payments in April 2020.  

On January 4, the IRS issued a news release urging people to visit IRS.gov for the most current information on the second round of Economic Impact Payments rather than calling the agency or their financial institutions or tax software providers. The release says the IRS phone advisors do not have additional information beyond what’s available on IRS.gov

On January 5, the IRS issued a second news release saying they updated the “Get My Payment” tool with information around the second round of stimulus payments. The Service acknowledged issues and errors with the “Get My Payment” tool, and they encouraged people to check back later. 

On January 8, the IRS acknowledged some payments may have gone into a temporary bank account established when people’s 2019 tax return were filed, and they are taking immediate steps to redirect stimulus payments to the correct account for those affected.  

The ITRC asks consumers to visit IRS.gov and to be patient throughout the process. We will update consumers if new information arises. Anyone concerned about a missing stimulus payment can also contact the ITRC toll-free either by phone (888.400.5530) or via live-chat. All people have to do is go to idtheftcenter.org to get started.  


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*Updated as of 1/5/2021

  • More stimulus payments are on the way. Scammers are aware, too, which means another round of stimulus payment-related scams.  
  • Remember, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will not text, email or call anyone about a stimulus payment. If someone receives an unsolicited message from someone claiming to be with the IRS, it is probably a scam. Consumers should contact the IRS directly to verify before they respond. 
  • Offers that require people to pay to receive a stimulus benefit or to use a service to get a payment faster are also signs of a stimulus payment scam. 
  • Consumers can track their new stimulus checks once they are sent. Then can visit the IRS “Get My Payment” page to follow their payments.  
  •  To learn more about stimulus payment scams, the new stimulus payment or if someone suspects they are the victim of a stimulus scam, they can contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website.  

New Stimulus Payments Approved by Lawmakers 

Lawmakers have agreed on a new stimulus package, which includes a $600 stimulus payment for anyone who earns $75,000 or less. There is also a reduced payment for anyone who makes $75,000-$99,000. New stimulus checks mean more scams are on the way. With more stimulus payment fraud expected, consumers should know how to spot a scam and what to do if an identity criminal contacts them.  

In the spring of 2020, the first batch of stimulus payments assisted Americans in need of financial relief due to the economic impacts of COVID-19. Criminals took advantage of the situation by offering to help benefit recipients speed access to their stimulus funds. Criminals stole checks from nursing home residents, out of people’s mailboxes, and even from postal trucks. The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has already seen some of those methods used to steal identity information and stimulus payments the second time around. The ITRC has also had a sharp rise in reported stolen stimulus payments and stimulus payment scams cases.

As of January 3, 2021, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) had logged more than 298,000 consumer complaints related to COVID-19 and stimulus payments totaling more than $253 million in losses. Two-thirds of the complaints involved fraud or identity theft. The median fraud loss per person is $324.

Possible Stimulus Payment Scams 

Criminals have used different schemes to trick people, and they can be expected to do the same this time, too. Here are a few things for people to watch for that indicate that someone might be the target of a stimulus payment scam: 

  • Text messages and emails about stimulus payments – Criminals use text messages and emails to send malicious links in hopes that people will click on them to divulge personal information or insert malware onto someone’s device. If anyone receives a text message or email about a stimulus check or direct deposit with a link to click or a file to open, they should ignore it. It’s a scam because the IRS will not contact anyone unsolicited by text, email or phone to discuss a stimulus payment. 
  • Asked to verify financial information – The IRS will not call, text or email anyone to verify their information. If information needs to be confirmed, people will be directed to an IRS web page. This includes retirees who might not typically file a tax return.  
  • A fake check in the mail – Anyone who earns $75,000 or less will get $600 per dependent.  People who make between $75,000-$99,000 will receive a reduced amount. Anyone who gets a check and has questions about the amount, or thinks the check seems suspicious, should contact the IRS.  
  • Offers for faster payments – Any claim offering payment faster through a third-party is a scam. All new stimulus checks will come from the IRS, and the IRS says there is no way to expedite a payment.  
  • Pay to get a check – No one has to pay to receive a stimulus check. New stimulus checks will be deposited directly into the same banking account used for previous stimulus payments or the most recent tax refund. If the IRS does not have someone’s direct deposit information, a check will be mailed to the last known address on file at the IRS.
  • Stolen checks – The ITRC has received numerous complaints from consumers about their stimulus checks being stolen. If anyone believes their payment is stolen, they should visit IDTheft.gov, where they can report, “Someone filed a Federal tax return – or claimed an economic stimulus payment – using my information.”

What to Do If You’re a Victim of Stimulus Payment Scams 

 If anyone believes their information may have been compromised or their stimulus payment was stolen, the IRS suggests people report it to the IRS and FTC simultaneously through IdentityTheft.gov. If anyone wants to learn more about stimulus payment scams or if someone believes they are the victim of a stimulus payment scam, they may also contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free. Consumers can call (888.400.5530) or live-chat on the website. People can go to www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.

  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warns consumers that while a vaccine is closer to distribution, so are COVID-19 vaccine scams. 
  • The FDA fears misleading products could cause Americans to delay or stop appropriate medical treatment, leading to life-threatening harm. 
  • There is also a fear that the COVID-19 vaccine scams could lead to many people having their personally identifiable information (PII) and personal health information (PHI) stolen. 
  • Consumers should only get vaccines from approved medical providers, not respond to any calls that ask for PHI or PII, and not click on any links claiming to sell cures. 
  • For more information, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free by live-chat on the company website or by calling 888.400.5530.  

coronavirus vaccine is closer to reality, with companies like Pfizer and Moderna seeking permission to distribute their vaccines to Americans. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and investigators warn that scammers are also waiting, ready to take advantage of those desperate for the vaccine by tricking them with a COVID-19 vaccine scam.  

The FDA fears deceptive and misleading products might cause Americans to delay or stop appropriate medical treatment, leading to serious and life-threatening harm. There is also a fear that bogus claims about vaccines and treatments could lead to people having their personally identifiable information (PII) and personal health information (PHI) stolen by cybercriminals.  

Who is the Target 

Vulnerable & high-risk populations; individuals waiting for the vaccine 

What is the Scam 

COVID-19 vaccine scams could come in many different forms. Investigators expect scammers to create fake websites, try to sell fake vaccines and treatments, and try to get people’s PII and PHI along the way. Identity thieves used similar tactics while trying to take advantage of a shortage of COVID-19 tests and personal protective equipment (PPE) like masks, gloves and gowns near the beginning of the pandemic.

How You Can Avoid Being Scammed 

  • Homeland Security investigators say you should only get vaccinated from an approved medical provider. 
  • Do not respond to any calls about COVID-19 vaccines that ask for your personal information like Social Security Number and “promise to reserve you a vaccine.”
  • Do not click on any posts or ads claiming to sell cures. Remember, if it seems too good to be true, it probably is. 
  • Never click on any links, open any attachments, or download any files in an email claiming to offer a COVID-19 vaccine.  

To learn more about COVID-19 vaccine scams, or if you believe you are a victim of a vaccine scam, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free by calling 888.400.5530. You can also visit the company website to live-chat with an expert advisor. Go to www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.  

  • The 2020 COVID-19 holiday season is upon us. This year, consumers should be on the lookout for job scamsgiving scamsgrandparent scams and online shopping scams, to name a few.  
  • If anyone comes across an unknown message regarding the COVID-19 holiday season, they should ignore it and go directly back to the source to confirm the message’s legitimacy. 
  • People should take steps to protect their personal information when shopping online, taking part in holiday gatherings (both in person or via a video platform), at the gas pump, and when receiving electronic gifts. 
  • To learn more, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or via live-chat on the company website.  

COVID-19 has changed the way people live. Many people are working from home, there are restrictions on what people can do in public, and many businesses remain shut down or open at a limited capacity. It has also changed the way scammers attack consumers. 

The 2020 holiday season will also be much different than year’s past. According to IBM’s latest U.S. Retail Index Report, COVID-19 has accelerated the shift away from physical stores to digital shopping by roughly five years. 

Criminals may adopt new tactics to take advantage of the pandemic, but what will not be different is scammers’ and identity thieves’ ability to find ways to strike.  

Watch for COVID-19 Holiday Scams   

Here are some scams to watch for this COVID-19 holiday season. 

1. Job Scams – Much of the economy remains shut down or open in a limited capacity. Millions of people are looking to gig economy jobs like Uber, Lyft and DoorDash to get by. People could rely on gig economy jobs even more during the holidays to make extra cash. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) reported losses of $134 million in 2019 to social media scams.

In the first half of 2020, the FTC already reported $117 million, with most scams coming from viewing an ad. Scammers may claim in advertisements that they can get shoppers access to premium jobs for the holidays with big tips in exchange for an upfront fee. Gig economy scams can also lead consumers to phishing websites that steal login credentials. 

2. Giving Scams – People typically give more to charities around the holiday season. However, with more families in need of help in 2020, we may see an even bigger increase in people making donations. Expect criminals to attack with giving scams, looking to steal people’s money and personal information. In fact, scammers have used giving scams to take advantage of people since the beginning of the pandemic.  

3. Grandparent Scams – Another popular holiday scam is the grandparent scam. A grandparent scam is where scammers claim a family member is in trouble and needs help. With the holidays here, scammers could pose as sick family members. 

4. Online Shopping Scams – Many more people will be shopping online this holiday season. According to the Better Business Bureau (BBB), 65 percent of people shopped online last year. This year, online shopping is expected to increase by 10 percent to 75 percent. With the increase in web traffic, consumers should be wary of messages claiming they have been locked out of their accounts. Scammers may send phishing emails making such claims while looking to steal usernames, passwords and account information.  

How to Protect Yourself from COVID-19 Holiday Scams 

While scammers will try to trick consumers, there are things people can do to protect themselves from a COVID-19 holiday scam. 

  • If someone comes across an ad for a job or a deal online that seems too good to be true, it probably is. Consumers should go back to the source directly by contacting the company to confirm the message’s validity. 
  • If someone receives an email, text message or phone call they are not expecting, ignore it. If any of the messages contain links, attachments or files, do not click or download them because they could have malware designed to steal people’s personal information or lead to a phishing attack. Again, consumers should reach out directly to who the caller, email sender or text message sender claimed to be or the company they claimed to be with.  
  • People should only donate to legitimate charities and organizations registered with their state.   Consumers can determine if a charity, non-profit or company is legitimate by searching for the charity’s charitable registration information on the Secretary of State’s website, looking for online reviews and Googling the entity with the word “scam” after it. 
  • No one should ever make a payment over the phone to someone they do not know or were not expecting to hear from. Scammers will try to trick people with robocalls to steal their sensitive information and commit identity theft. 

How to Protect Your Personally Identifiable Information (PII) This Holiday Season 

Identity Thieves will try different ways to steal people’s PII. It is crucial consumers can protect their PII during the holidays, and year-round, to make sure it does not end up in the hands of a criminal.  

1. At the Pump – More people will travel by car this year than usual. Travelers on the road should keep an eye out for gas station skimmers. Skimmers insert a thin film into the card reader or use a Bluetooth device at a gas pump to steals the card’s information that allows the thief to misuse the payment card account. If the pump looks tampered with, pay inside. Newer gas pumps use contactless technology and chipped payment cards that are very secure. Use those pumps if possible.  

2. Holiday Gatherings – It is always important to protect all personal information at holiday gatherings. While no one ever imagines a trusted friend or family member will go through their stuff, people fall victim every year. Keep wallets or purses with financial cards or I.D. cards within reach.  

3. Zoom and Other Online Video Platforms – Not all family gatherings will be in person in 2020 due to COVID-19. Some families will meet virtually via a video platform. When people use a video platform, it’s important they remember to secure the call by using strict privacy settings and not sharing any personal information with someone they don’t know.  

4. Shopping Online – With more people shopping online for the 2020 holiday season, people need to practice good cyber hygiene. Make sure to navigate directly to a retailer’s website rather than click on a link in an ad, email, text or social media post. Phishing schemes are very sophisticated these days and spotting a spoofed website of well-known and local brands can be difficult even for trained cybersecurity professionals. 

Consumers will still need to do their due diligence to ensure a business website is legitimate. There is inherently less risk of falling for a scam website by shopping at well-known retailers. It only takes a bit of homework to separate the scams from legitimate small online businesses. Using search terms like “Scam” or “Complaints” along with the website or company name can give people insight into the experience of other customers. 

When setting up a new online account, be sure to use multi-factor authentication. Multi-factor authentication creates a second layer of security to reduce the risk of a criminal taking over someone’s account. 

5. Electronic Gifts – With the advent of smart home devices, many gifts connect to the internet, presenting security risks. It is important consumers update the software on the device. It is also a good idea to have antivirus software installed on any computer, tablet or internet device if possible, along with a secure password on the home network router.  

For more information on how to stay safe during the COVID-19 holiday season contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or live-chat with an identity theft advisor at no-cost.

For access to more resources, download the ITRC’s free ID Theft Help app.  


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  • Scammers are looking to take advantage of consumers that need money due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic with a credit line scam. 
  • The scam tries to trick consumers with fake phone calls that look like they are from legitimate banks offering credit lines with low interest rates. Ultimately, scammers are looking to steal sensitive personal information or financial information.  
  • People should be cautious when taking a call from someone claiming to be with a bank. Consumers are encouraged to call the bank directly if they are interested in a new line of credit. Also, if anyone is struggling to pay off their debts, they should only talk to the holder of the debt.   
  • For more information on credit line scams, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website. 

Many people need money due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Scammers are taking advantage by trying to trick consumers with fake phone calls that look like they are from legitimate banks offering lines of credit with a low interest rate. The scam can fool people because the calls can have spoofed phone numbers to make it look like they are coming from a legitimate bank.  

Who ithe Target 

Vulnerable consumers that need money 

What is the Scam 

It is a credit line scam that targets people by phone. The calls begin with a stolen recording from a real bank. Once a “live agent” joins the call, they offer credit lines with low interest rates. However, before the caller gets their new credit line, they have to provide their credit card number and other credit card details. The Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) Midwest Region Office tells ABC 7 Chicago that they have received thousands of complaints about this particular credit line scam.  

What They Want 

Credit card numbers, expiration dates and the three-digit CVV code on the back of the card; stolen credit card information can lead to different forms of financial identity theft 

How You Can Avoid Being Scammed 

  • If you get a call from someone claiming to be with a bank and offering credit, be cautious and don’t give out sensitive personal information. You can also let the call go to voicemail and call the security department directly through the number on the bank’s website.  
  • If you are interested in a credit line, contact your bank directly. 
  • If you are having trouble paying off any of your debts, only talk to the holder of that debt.  

If you believe you are a victim of a credit line scam or would like to learn more, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also speak with an expert advisor on the company website via the live-chat function. 


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  • Quick Response Codes, or QR Codes, continue to generally grow in popularity, especially due to COVID-19. Hackers are aware and are looking to possibly attack consumers with the digital barcodes. 
  • There have been attacks in India and Brussels in 2020. Malwarebytes reports the U.S. saw QR Code scams and attacks in 2019.   
  • To reduce their chance of a compromise, QR Code users should be somewhat skeptical when using one of the digital cubes. Look for things that might seem out of the ordinary – like asking for logins, passwords or payment information. Ask an employee if you encounter something you think is odd.  
  • For more information, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website.  

Quick Response Codes, also known as QR Codes, have generally grown in popularity over the years. COVID-19 has sped the use, with an increasing number of businesses using QR Codes for contactless encounters and transactions. However, hackers are aware of the rise, which could mean QR Code security threats to consumers who use them. 

Waitress providing menu for restaurant goer through contactless QR code

What is a QR Code? 

QR Codes are digital barcodes often used for electronic tickets for travel or events, to view a restaurant’s menu, or to share product information at a retailer. They are a quick way to get people to websites, promotional codes and mobile payments.  

QR Code Security Threats 

The convenience of QR Codes comes with security risks too. According to a survey of consumers conducted by MobileIron, 71 percent of respondents could not tell the difference between a malicious QR Code and a legitimate one. Also, more than 51 percent of respondents did not have mobile security on their devices (or did not know if they did) to provide QR Code security in case of a QR Code-related attack.  

Attackers can take advantage of people’s trust in QR Codes by embedding malicious software into the digital cubes. MobileIron says they expect QR Code attacks to increase in the near future. The attacks would steal data from mobile devices or lead to phishing websites that could harvest credentials and other personal information.  

What You Can Do 

Attacks can lead to many different actions that range from inconvenient to malicious. This includes risky texts, emails, initiating a phone call, or adding a contact listing. However, there is one thing consumers can do to protect themselves: be skeptical.  

  • If you see what seems to be a QR Code physically pasted on top of another, ask an employee. The restaurant or retailer may have just updated their QR Code, but it could also be a sign of a malicious code. 
  • Before scanning the QR Code, check the website address of the code. Many phones will allow you to view the web address before you scan it. If you are unsure about the website, you can safely view the site by searching it by adding a “+” sign after the URL. You can also ask an employee about any suspicious website addresses. 
  • Only scan codes from trusted entities. The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) always tells consumers to use trusted entities when donating to a charity or shopping online because there is less risk. The same advice applies to QR Codes. A trusted entity will be less likely to have a malicious QR code on a restaurant menu, plane ticket or promotional code. 

Contact the ITRC 

Consumers need to be aware of QR Code security threats. The more people protect themselves, the harder it will be for identity thieves to succeed in hacking people using QR Codes. If you would like to learn more or believe you have been a victim of a QR Code attack, contact the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 or on the company website via live-chat.  


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This article has been updated as of November 2, 2020

Update 11/2/20 – According to the IRS, anyone who does not usually file a tax return, or did not file a tax return in 2018 or 2019, might not know if they qualify for an economic impact payment. Nearly nine million people that fall into this category will receive a letter from the IRS with information on how to register on their website to claim their payment, which has a deadline of November 21, 2020. The letter is legitimate. Anyone who receives one should either call the IRS directly at 800.919.9835 to register, or visit IRS.gov/EIP.  

However, if anyone receives a phone call, text message or email from someone claiming to be the IRS and wants to help you receive your stimulus payment, hang up, do not respond, and do not click on any links or attachments. The IRS will not text, email or call about an economic impact payment. They will also never ask anyone to pay a fee to get their money.  

The IRS and it’s partners will do a final push on November 10, National EIP Registration Day, to reach out to people who do not normally file their taxes. To learn more about stimulus payments, visit the IRS website.  

This article was originally posted, April 14, 2020

The Treasury Department and the IRS continue towards getting consumers their stimulus checks due to the COVID-19 pandemic. With the distribution of stimulus checks underway, non-filers are now able to get their stimulus payments sooner thanks in part to an online tool that was created to help consumers that aren’t required to file tax returns. However, it is important non-filers know the proper steps to take to protect their personal data and information so they don’t fall for a stimulus check scam.

First, non-filers should go directly to the IRS website, IRS.gov. Always start at the most trusted source.

Second, non-filers should click the tab that says “Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Here.” If consumers do not see this tab on the front page, they are not on the right page.

Image of irs.gov

Consumers should proceed to click on the “Non-Filers” tab. Once they click on the tab, it should take them to a page that has information on the “Economic Impact Payment” and additional information on what consumers need to provide and what they should expect. The next step is to, once again, click on the tab titled “Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Here” that can be found in the middle of the page.

Image of irs.gov

Once the tab is clicked on, visitors will be redirected to freefilefillableforms.com. The redirect could feel like a scam. However, if the homepage looks like the one below, consumers are at the right place. (The ITRC has verified that this is a valid redirect)

Image of freefilefillableforms.com

From there all people have to do is hit “Get Started” to begin. Once a profile is created, non-filers will be asked for personal information like their Social Security number, address, dependents and direct deposit information. In this case, it is okay for consumers to provide sensitive information.

However, if anyone receives emails, text messages or phone calls about non-filers filing for a stimulus check, they should ignore it because it is probably a stimulus check scam. People should be going directly to the source, in this case, the IRS, to complete the process.

Since the stimulus package was merely a thought, scammers have increased their efforts around stimulus check scams. It is important for people to never give out personal information over the phone or to anyone they do not know personally. Also, it is important to know the facts. The IRS will not call anyone.

If people have questions regarding non-filers or stimulus check scams, they can live chat with an expert ITRC advisor. For those that cannot access the website, they can call the toll-free hotline (888.400.5530) and leave a message for an advisor. While the advisors are working remotely, there may be a delay in responding but someone will assist you as quickly as possible.


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  • The Federal Trade Commission reports that people who lost money to scams that started on social media has more than tripled in 2020, with a significant increase in the second quarter of the year. 
  • The increase in social media scams fits the overall 2020 trend of more phishing scams on channels besides email. 
  • Some recent social media scams include romance scamsfake advertisements, and social media messages offering grant money or giveaways. 
  • To reduce the risk of falling for a social media scam, don’t click on any links from unknown messages, do research on any ad seen on social media, and never send money to someone you’ve never met in person. 
  • To learn more, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530, or speak with an expert advisor via live-chat on the company website. 

There is an increase of social media scams in 2020, fitting the overall trend of the year of more phishing scams on channels besides email. Scams strike people in many different ways, ranging from robocalls to phishing attacks. While social media websites are another platform scammers use for their attacks, it’s not always the first place people think to monitor when they hear the phrase “phishing scams.” 

Scammers Take Advantage of More People Online During COVID-19 

However, 2020 is different. Social media is already a great place to connect, but especially right now due to COVID-19. More people are using social media, and scammers are aware. In fact, more scammers are hanging out on the sites, posing a greater threat for scams to users. Scammers know COVID-19 changes the way people live, and they try to take advantage in any way possible. 

New Report on Increase in Social Media Scams 

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) reports that people who lost money to scams that started on social media has more than tripled in 2020, with a significant increase in the second quarter of the year. The FTC says the growth has been happening for years, reporting social media scam fraud losses of $134 million in 2019.  

However, the first half of 2020 had $117 million in fraud losses from social media scams alone. Some recent social media scams include romance scamsfake advertisements, and social media messages offering grant money or giveaways. Often, scammers create fake profiles of people victims may know to take advantage of them. In some cases, scammers will even take over a real person’s account. 

How to Avoid a Social Media Scam 

Consumers can do a handful of things to reduce their risk of falling victim to a social media scam.  

  1. Check the validity of any ad you see on social media. Do a quick Google search of the supposed business followed by “complaints,” “reviews” or “scam.” This will help you determine whether or not the company has been reported or accused of any suspicious activity. Also, directly search for the company website. Any legitimate company will most likely have contact information on their webpage. 
  1. Never click on a link or open an attachment without verifying the validity of the message or ad. You can do this by directly reaching out to the company to see if they sent the message or posted the ad. If not, it is probably a scam. If you cannot find any contact information for the company, it is probably a scam. 
  1. Reach out directly by phone or email to the friend or family member asking for money or personal information. If they did not send the message, the sender’s account was probably hacked. 
  1. Never send money or personal information to someone you have never met in person. Imposter scams, where scammers try to trick people into giving up personal information or money by posing as someone fake, continue to rise throughout the country.  
  1. Regularly check your privacy settings on all of your social media platforms. Make it more challenging for scammers to target you by limiting what you share online. 

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center 

Consumers should be aware of the 2020 trend around scams and that scammers will continue to hang out in the social media space. However, if everyone does their part, they can still enjoy the platforms with minimal risk of falling for a social media scam.  

To learn more, or if you believe you are the victim of a social media scam, reach out to the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) toll-free at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website. Also, download the ITRC’s free ID Theft Help app for access to additional resources. 


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With some businesses opening back up after temporarily closing due to the COVID-19 pandemic, scammers are trying to capitalize using online job scams to steal people’s personal information.

Recently, Scripps Health found hackers exploiting job seekers through phishing emails with Scripps Health-themed “lures.” Scripps sent the following email to warn their community members:

Image provided to the Identity Theft Resource Center by public

ATA Engineering, another San Diego-based company, reports they also are seeing similar-type online job scams.

The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has seen a rise in victims contacting the organization about online job scams, including phishing emails. Some of the particular job scams reported to the ITRC include ones from Indeed, Zip Recruiter, and Facebook. The ITRC has had more than 40 victims reach out about online job scams the last three months.

Who Is It Targeting

People looking for work amist the COVID-19 pandemic

What Is It

Either a fake listing posted on a job board or a phishing email, robocall, social media message, or text message looking for a response.

What Are They After

While scammers attack in different ways, they are all looking for one thing: personal information. They hope they can trick people who are desperate or vulnerable into giving up sensitive data like usernames and passwords, financial data, or Social Security numbers. Once scammers have that information, they can commit many different forms of identity theft.

How You Can Avoid It

  • Never click on a link or open an attachment from an email you are not expecting. Instead, go directly to the source to verify the validity of the message.
  • Review all emails and websites carefully to make sure there are no suspicious addresses, subject lines or URLs.
  • Be careful about how much personal data you share, at least during the application process. Do not turn over information like your Social Security number until you are hired.
  • Make sure you have the job, and it is legitimate, before giving away financial information like a bank account number or routing number for direct depositing of paychecks.

If you think you may have fallen victim to an online job scam, you can call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat with an expert advisor on the company website.


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