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  • Scammers are looking to take advantage of consumers that need money due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic with a credit line scam. 
  • The scam tries to trick consumers with fake phone calls that look like they are from legitimate banks offering credit lines with low interest rates. Ultimately, scammers are looking to steal sensitive personal information or financial information.  
  • People should be cautious when taking a call from someone claiming to be with a bank. Consumers are encouraged to call the bank directly if they are interested in a new line of credit. Also, if anyone is struggling to pay off their debts, they should only talk to the holder of the debt.   
  • For more information on credit line scams, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website. 

Many people need money due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Scammers are taking advantage by trying to trick consumers with fake phone calls that look like they are from legitimate banks offering lines of credit with a low interest rate. The scam can fool people because the calls can have spoofed phone numbers to make it look like they are coming from a legitimate bank.  

Who ithe Target 

Vulnerable consumers that need money 

What is the Scam 

It is a credit line scam that targets people by phone. The calls begin with a stolen recording from a real bank. Once a “live agent” joins the call, they offer credit lines with low interest rates. However, before the caller gets their new credit line, they have to provide their credit card number and other credit card details. The Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) Midwest Region Office tells ABC 7 Chicago that they have received thousands of complaints about this particular credit line scam.  

What They Want 

Credit card numbers, expiration dates and the three-digit CVV code on the back of the card; stolen credit card information can lead to different forms of financial identity theft 

How You Can Avoid Being Scammed 

  • If you get a call from someone claiming to be with a bank and offering credit, be cautious and don’t give out sensitive personal information. You can also let the call go to voicemail and call the security department directly through the number on the bank’s website.  
  • If you are interested in a credit line, contact your bank directly. 
  • If you are having trouble paying off any of your debts, only talk to the holder of that debt.  

If you believe you are a victim of a credit line scam or would like to learn more, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also speak with an expert advisor on the company website via the live-chat function. 


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QR Code Security Threats Begin to Grow as Digital Barcode Popularity Rises

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  • Quick Response Codes, or QR Codes, continue to generally grow in popularity, especially due to COVID-19. Hackers are aware and are looking to possibly attack consumers with the digital barcodes. 
  • There have been attacks in India and Brussels in 2020. Malwarebytes reports the U.S. saw QR Code scams and attacks in 2019.   
  • To reduce their chance of a compromise, QR Code users should be somewhat skeptical when using one of the digital cubes. Look for things that might seem out of the ordinary – like asking for logins, passwords or payment information. Ask an employee if you encounter something you think is odd.  
  • For more information, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website.  

Quick Response Codes, also known as QR Codes, have generally grown in popularity over the years. COVID-19 has sped the use, with an increasing number of businesses using QR Codes for contactless encounters and transactions. However, hackers are aware of the rise, which could mean QR Code security threats to consumers who use them. 

Waitress providing menu for restaurant goer through contactless QR code

What is a QR Code? 

QR Codes are digital barcodes often used for electronic tickets for travel or events, to view a restaurant’s menu, or to share product information at a retailer. They are a quick way to get people to websites, promotional codes and mobile payments.  

QR Code Security Threats 

The convenience of QR Codes comes with security risks too. According to a survey of consumers conducted by MobileIron, 71 percent of respondents could not tell the difference between a malicious QR Code and a legitimate one. Also, more than 51 percent of respondents did not have mobile security on their devices (or did not know if they did) to provide QR Code security in case of a QR Code-related attack.  

Attackers can take advantage of people’s trust in QR Codes by embedding malicious software into the digital cubes. MobileIron says they expect QR Code attacks to increase in the near future. The attacks would steal data from mobile devices or lead to phishing websites that could harvest credentials and other personal information.  

What You Can Do 

Attacks can lead to many different actions that range from inconvenient to malicious. This includes risky texts, emails, initiating a phone call, or adding a contact listing. However, there is one thing consumers can do to protect themselves: be skeptical.  

  • If you see what seems to be a QR Code physically pasted on top of another, ask an employee. The restaurant or retailer may have just updated their QR Code, but it could also be a sign of a malicious code. 
  • Before scanning the QR Code, check the website address of the code. Many phones will allow you to view the web address before you scan it. If you are unsure about the website, you can safely view the site by searching it by adding a “+” sign after the URL. You can also ask an employee about any suspicious website addresses. 
  • Only scan codes from trusted entities. The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) always tells consumers to use trusted entities when donating to a charity or shopping online because there is less risk. The same advice applies to QR Codes. A trusted entity will be less likely to have a malicious QR code on a restaurant menu, plane ticket or promotional code. 

Contact the ITRC 

Consumers need to be aware of QR Code security threats. The more people protect themselves, the harder it will be for identity thieves to succeed in hacking people using QR Codes. If you would like to learn more or believe you have been a victim of a QR Code attack, contact the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 or on the company website via live-chat.  


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This article has been updated as of November 2, 2020

Update 11/2/20 – According to the IRS, anyone who does not usually file a tax return, or did not file a tax return in 2018 or 2019, might not know if they qualify for an economic impact payment. Nearly nine million people that fall into this category will receive a letter from the IRS with information on how to register on their website to claim their payment, which has a deadline of November 21, 2020. The letter is legitimate. Anyone who receives one should either call the IRS directly at 800.919.9835 to register, or visit IRS.gov/EIP.  

However, if anyone receives a phone call, text message or email from someone claiming to be the IRS and wants to help you receive your stimulus payment, hang up, do not respond, and do not click on any links or attachments. The IRS will not text, email or call about an economic impact payment. They will also never ask anyone to pay a fee to get their money.  

The IRS and it’s partners will do a final push on November 10, National EIP Registration Day, to reach out to people who do not normally file their taxes. To learn more about stimulus payments, visit the IRS website.  

This article was originally posted, April 14, 2020

The Treasury Department and the IRS continue towards getting consumers their stimulus checks due to the COVID-19 pandemic. With the distribution of stimulus checks underway, non-filers are now able to get their stimulus payments sooner thanks in part to an online tool that was created to help consumers that aren’t required to file tax returns. However, it is important non-filers know the proper steps to take to protect their personal data and information so they don’t fall for a stimulus check scam.

First, non-filers should go directly to the IRS website, IRS.gov. Always start at the most trusted source.

Second, non-filers should click the tab that says “Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Here.” If consumers do not see this tab on the front page, they are not on the right page.

Image of irs.gov

Consumers should proceed to click on the “Non-Filers” tab. Once they click on the tab, it should take them to a page that has information on the “Economic Impact Payment” and additional information on what consumers need to provide and what they should expect. The next step is to, once again, click on the tab titled “Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Here” that can be found in the middle of the page.

Image of irs.gov

Once the tab is clicked on, visitors will be redirected to freefilefillableforms.com. The redirect could feel like a scam. However, if the homepage looks like the one below, consumers are at the right place. (The ITRC has verified that this is a valid redirect)

Image of freefilefillableforms.com

From there all people have to do is hit “Get Started” to begin. Once a profile is created, non-filers will be asked for personal information like their Social Security number, address, dependents and direct deposit information. In this case, it is okay for consumers to provide sensitive information.

However, if anyone receives emails, text messages or phone calls about non-filers filing for a stimulus check, they should ignore it because it is probably a stimulus check scam. People should be going directly to the source, in this case, the IRS, to complete the process.

Since the stimulus package was merely a thought, scammers have increased their efforts around stimulus check scams. It is important for people to never give out personal information over the phone or to anyone they do not know personally. Also, it is important to know the facts. The IRS will not call anyone.

If people have questions regarding non-filers or stimulus check scams, they can live chat with an expert ITRC advisor. For those that cannot access the website, they can call the toll-free hotline (888.400.5530) and leave a message for an advisor. While the advisors are working remotely, there may be a delay in responding but someone will assist you as quickly as possible.


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  • The Federal Trade Commission reports that people who lost money to scams that started on social media has more than tripled in 2020, with a significant increase in the second quarter of the year. 
  • The increase in social media scams fits the overall 2020 trend of more phishing scams on channels besides email. 
  • Some recent social media scams include romance scamsfake advertisements, and social media messages offering grant money or giveaways. 
  • To reduce the risk of falling for a social media scam, don’t click on any links from unknown messages, do research on any ad seen on social media, and never send money to someone you’ve never met in person. 
  • To learn more, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530, or speak with an expert advisor via live-chat on the company website. 

There is an increase of social media scams in 2020, fitting the overall trend of the year of more phishing scams on channels besides email. Scams strike people in many different ways, ranging from robocalls to phishing attacks. While social media websites are another platform scammers use for their attacks, it’s not always the first place people think to monitor when they hear the phrase “phishing scams.” 

Scammers Take Advantage of More People Online During COVID-19 

However, 2020 is different. Social media is already a great place to connect, but especially right now due to COVID-19. More people are using social media, and scammers are aware. In fact, more scammers are hanging out on the sites, posing a greater threat for scams to users. Scammers know COVID-19 changes the way people live, and they try to take advantage in any way possible. 

New Report on Increase in Social Media Scams 

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) reports that people who lost money to scams that started on social media has more than tripled in 2020, with a significant increase in the second quarter of the year. The FTC says the growth has been happening for years, reporting social media scam fraud losses of $134 million in 2019.  

However, the first half of 2020 had $117 million in fraud losses from social media scams alone. Some recent social media scams include romance scamsfake advertisements, and social media messages offering grant money or giveaways. Often, scammers create fake profiles of people victims may know to take advantage of them. In some cases, scammers will even take over a real person’s account. 

How to Avoid a Social Media Scam 

Consumers can do a handful of things to reduce their risk of falling victim to a social media scam.  

  1. Check the validity of any ad you see on social media. Do a quick Google search of the supposed business followed by “complaints,” “reviews” or “scam.” This will help you determine whether or not the company has been reported or accused of any suspicious activity. Also, directly search for the company website. Any legitimate company will most likely have contact information on their webpage. 
  1. Never click on a link or open an attachment without verifying the validity of the message or ad. You can do this by directly reaching out to the company to see if they sent the message or posted the ad. If not, it is probably a scam. If you cannot find any contact information for the company, it is probably a scam. 
  1. Reach out directly by phone or email to the friend or family member asking for money or personal information. If they did not send the message, the sender’s account was probably hacked. 
  1. Never send money or personal information to someone you have never met in person. Imposter scams, where scammers try to trick people into giving up personal information or money by posing as someone fake, continue to rise throughout the country.  
  1. Regularly check your privacy settings on all of your social media platforms. Make it more challenging for scammers to target you by limiting what you share online. 

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center 

Consumers should be aware of the 2020 trend around scams and that scammers will continue to hang out in the social media space. However, if everyone does their part, they can still enjoy the platforms with minimal risk of falling for a social media scam.  

To learn more, or if you believe you are the victim of a social media scam, reach out to the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) toll-free at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website. Also, download the ITRC’s free ID Theft Help app for access to additional resources. 


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With some businesses opening back up after temporarily closing due to the COVID-19 pandemic, scammers are trying to capitalize using online job scams to steal people’s personal information.

Recently, Scripps Health found hackers exploiting job seekers through phishing emails with Scripps Health-themed “lures.” Scripps sent the following email to warn their community members:

Image provided to the Identity Theft Resource Center by public

ATA Engineering, another San Diego-based company, reports they also are seeing similar-type online job scams.

The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has seen a rise in victims contacting the organization about online job scams, including phishing emails. Some of the particular job scams reported to the ITRC include ones from Indeed, Zip Recruiter, and Facebook. The ITRC has had more than 40 victims reach out about online job scams the last three months.

Who Is It Targeting

People looking for work amist the COVID-19 pandemic

What Is It

Either a fake listing posted on a job board or a phishing email, robocall, social media message, or text message looking for a response.

What Are They After

While scammers attack in different ways, they are all looking for one thing: personal information. They hope they can trick people who are desperate or vulnerable into giving up sensitive data like usernames and passwords, financial data, or Social Security numbers. Once scammers have that information, they can commit many different forms of identity theft.

How You Can Avoid It

  • Never click on a link or open an attachment from an email you are not expecting. Instead, go directly to the source to verify the validity of the message.
  • Review all emails and websites carefully to make sure there are no suspicious addresses, subject lines or URLs.
  • Be careful about how much personal data you share, at least during the application process. Do not turn over information like your Social Security number until you are hired.
  • Make sure you have the job, and it is legitimate, before giving away financial information like a bank account number or routing number for direct depositing of paychecks.

If you think you may have fallen victim to an online job scam, you can call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat with an expert advisor on the company website.


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The coronavirus is making a lasting impact on the United States in many different ways. More than 175,000 people have died from the coronavirus, and 57+ million Americans have filed for unemployment. Another noticeable impact is the dramatic increase in scams and identity theft. There have been more than 92,000 COVID-19 fraud reports and $118+ million lost from fraud, according to the Federal Trade Commission. A story published by the Washington Post reports that no event over the last decade has spawned as many schemes or lasted this long.

Since COVID-19 began seriously affecting the U.S. in March, fraudsters and scammers have been trying to take advantage of the situation to steal or misuse people’s personally identifiable information (PII) in any way possible to commit identity theft. Recently, scammers have been taking advantage of the medical space to commit financial identity theft from COVID-19, using many different methods.

Medicare and Medicaid Scams

There is some good news when it comes to COVID-19 scams. COVID-related phishing scams appear to be on the decline. According to CheckPoint, July saw a 50 percent decrease in COVID-19 scams compared to June. However, CheckPoint reported that COVID-19 medical and vaccine-related scams are still in high demand as the race is on to find a vaccine. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General (HHS-OIG) echoes a similar message. The HHS-OIG says scammers are offering tests to Medicare beneficiaries in exchange for PII, like Medicare and Medicaid information to commit financial identity theft.

The AMAC Foundation is so concerned about the current issue that they and Medicare.gov are sending a notice warning recipients of the scams. The HHS-OIG believes fraudsters are targeting recipients with telemarketing calls, text messages, social media messages and door-to-door visits in their effort to steal PII. PII can be used to bill Federal health care and commit financial identity theft fraudulently.

Insurance Scams

Insurance scams are another financial identity theft concern from COVID-19 with telemedicine being so widely available, as mentioned by the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud. The Coalition warns that costly insurance scams can exploit the burgeoning arms-length telemedicine. Tele-schemes can steal patients’ identities and defraud their insurance policies.

Medical Identity Theft Threat

While fraudsters are using the medical space to commit financial identity theft from COVID-19, there is also a risk of medical identity theft. According to a story published by CBS Dallas, hackers know more people are using the healthcare system, and they know they can take advantage of the situation.

If hackers get their hands on medical records, it could leave a lasting impact. The Senior Director of Threat Hunting and Intelligence at Binary Defense says someone who steals a victim’s identity can go as far as getting an expensive medical procedure done and charge it to the victim’s insurance account. The story suggests consumers give out the bare minimum amount of PII at medical appointments, ensure the provider’s online portals are secure, and ask providers to delete all of their medical records from the database once they are no longer a patient to help reduce their risk of falling victim to identity theft.

What You Can Do

Scammers are using Medicare and Medicaid scams, insurance scams, and a rise in people using the healthcare system to commit identity theft – particularly financial identity theft from COVID-19. However, there are still actions you can take to reduce your risk of falling victim to a COVID-19 scam or financial identity theft.

  • Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries should be cautious of any unsolicited requests for Medicare or Medicaid numbers
  • Keep an eye out for unexpected calls or messages that ask for PII. If someone receives a message with a link or an attachment, do not click or open anything. (NOTE: A physician or trusted health care provider will approve any COVID-19 tests or treatments.)
  • Anyone suspicious of COVID-19 healthcare fraud should report it online to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General or call 800.HHS.TIPS

If you are the victim of financial identity theft from COVID-19, or a COVID-19 scam, you can call the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat on our website to speak with an expert advisor.


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There are many unanswered questions about the coronavirus impacts in the United States, some of which center around how schools will reopen for the fall term. K-12 school districts in many areas are scheduled to resume classes in a matter of weeks. However, what the learning environment will look like has yet to be determined in many cases. With that said, there are a lot of concerns about how schools might implement distance learning on a large scale.

One concern that parents, teachers, administrators and technology leaders face is how to protect students’ personally identifiable information (PII) in an online environment. Child identity theft is a serious problem and educational institutions have been a target for hacking due to the vast amount of personal student data their servers store. A child’s identity credentials are seen as extremely valuable to identity thieves, primarily because of the long period of time where their use by the thieves can go undetected.

Parents are considering the option of continuing to keep their students distance learning, but internet safety tips for kids using online platforms will become even more important as more students (especially K-12) utilize digital education for a longer period of time. However, with so many different online platforms being used by schools of different sizes and needs, there could still be an increased risk of student data being exposed or stolen in a data compromise and then used to create synthetic identities or sold for marketing purposes.

In one example from 2019, an online education provider in the U.S. suffered an accidental overexposure when a database of possibly more than 19,000 students’ information was left unsecured. Anyone with an internet connection was able to see the data for more than a week before it was taken down and password protected. It is still not known if anyone accessed the information while it was exposed.

As the new school year takes shape, it will be vital that administrators and IT professionals put safeguards in place to prevent unauthorized access to student records, employee files and other sensitive materials. Understanding the laws that are already in place is important in helping schools avoid costly mistakes. In California, the state’s privacy and cybersecurity law (CCPA) requires businesses and organizations to safeguard consumer data against data breaches and accidental events. Companies are also required to obtain parents’ authorization when collecting data on any child under 13 years of age, as well as have permission from the parents and student if the child is between 13 and 16 years old. The U.S. government’s Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) also gives parents some control over what personal information companies can collect on their children under the age of 13.

The next step may be in limiting the type of information that schools gather, such as Social Security numbers or health insurance and Medicaid identification numbers. Another important child privacy step will be ensuring that all personnel who have access to stored data know how to secure it. As some educators switch to wearing multiple hats this fall, they must be well-trained on how to use the platforms their school systems have adopted.

For parents, there are many internet safety tips for kids they can teach their students when it comes to online security:

  • Parents should be mindful of what websites their kids visit and teach them about what types of information are okay to enter online
  • Parents are encouraged to help their kids be aware of the dangers of clicking links or downloading files, as these can contain viruses and malware
  • Parents should make sure all of their kids’ online interactions occur with a known and trusted individual to lessen the opportunity for social engineering
  • Parents can enact the strictest privacy control settings available on both their child’s computer, mobile devices and browsers they use

Anyone with questions about child identity theft, distance learning security or internet safety tips for kids can live-chat with an Identity Theft Resource Center expert advisor. They can also call toll-free at 888.400.5530.


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Mystery shopping has been around for a long time. Mystery shoppers help businesses, retailers and restaurants get information on the quality of their stores in exchange for money. In the past, scammers have found ways to turn the service into a mystery shopper scam, also known as a secret shopper scam. These scams are resurfacing during the coronavirus due to over 45 million people filing for unemployment and looking for some extra cash.

There are different forms of mystery shopper scams. One popular version of the scam is when scammers pose as retailers looking to lure people into being secret shoppers. They ask victims to pay for their products or training and then take off with their money. Fraudsters will also steal a victim’s personally identifiable information (PII) from the application they filled out and commit identity theft.

Another version of the mystery shopper scam includes fake checks. In this scam, the victim signs up to become a secret shopper through an online form – potentially giving away sensitive PII like Social Security numbers, date of birth and address. Then the victim is sent a check in the mail to use to secretly shop at a store. Once the check is posted to their bank account, the victim begins to shop as instructed. In some instances, the victim is told to buy reloadable cards and send pictures of them and their PIN card numbers from the back. Once the bank finds out the check is fake, the victim is on the hook for all of the money that they spent plus bank fees. This particular version of the scam lures victims in with a fake check, like the one pictured below that was sent to the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) from a mystery shopper scam victim:

At first glance the check appears to be legitimate. However, while the check says it is to PNC bank, the routing number is for HSBC. Hanover Insurance Company also has a notice on their website about fraudulent checks.

The ITRC was also sent this letter that went along with the check:

While the letter also seems legitimate at first glance, the company listed is Assign Retailer Metrics Inc. instead of Hanover Insurance Company. The letter also asks people to take pictures of the card numbers and scratched PIN numbers and email them to a Gmail account instead of a company account. These are just a few signs that prove this is a secret shopper scam.

Mystery shoppers can be very effective for retailers because the secret shopper can buy whatever the retailer wants them to buy and then report back their experience. However, it can leave consumers looking for a way to make a little extra money in the difficult economy vulnerable to being taken advantage of by ne’er-do-wells. There are things people can do to reduce their risk of falling for a mystery shopper scam.

To avoid these types of scams, people should:

  • Never pay to be a mystery shopper – don’t wire money or  send a “deposit” via PayPal, Venmo, or Zelle
  • Do NOT give out PII on an application
  • Be wary if offered a lot of money for a simple task
  • Cash the check at an issuing bank or wait until the money has not just posted but cleared the other account; if the check is not good, the victim can return the cash into their account

There are also things people can do to spot a legitimate mystery shopping opportunity. People should:

  • Do their research on legitimate opportunities; search the internet for reviews and comments on mystery shopping jobs
  • Remember they are paid to be a mystery shopper (typically after the task is completed); they do not have to pay to do it

Anyone who believes they are a victim of a mystery shopper scam can live-chat with an ITRC expert advisor or call toll-free at 888.400.5530. Advisors will guide victims on the next steps they need to take.


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Free credit reports are now available to access every week to help minimize the long-term economic impacts of COVID-19. The continuing crisis surrounding the virus has affected people’s lives in many ways. However, fear of the economic impact is also at the top of many people’s minds. Across the U.S., more than 40 million people have filed for unemployment benefits since the first wave of the coronavirus closures and many business owners have had to shut their doors. Some employees wonder if their jobs will be waiting for them and business owners question whether they will be able to reopen once it is safe to do so.

Fortunately, there is some good news for consumers who are concerned about their financial security. The three major credit reporting agencies are offering free credit reports every week through April 2021.

While the economic impacts can be far-reaching, there are other harmful effects as well. Data breaches continue to happen. At least six states who have established public-facing websites for filing unemployment claims have exposed tens of thousands of users’ identity credentials online. There have already been reports of scammers targeting those seeking assistance with phishing attempts.

Consumers have been entitled to a free copy of their credit reports, up to one copy per year from each of the three major credit reporting agencies—TransUnion, Equifax and Experian. Those reports are readily available from AnnualCreditReport.com and are easy to download. However, requesting further reports after the initial free request (in a twelve-month period) could incur a fee. Now, consumers will be able to access each of their free credit reports every week through next spring with no additional cost.

For consumers, checking and understanding their credit report is vital in order to maintain some control over their financial health. It gives them a clearer picture of their current debt and spending potential, as well as help uncover whether or not malicious actors have been using their identities. Any fraudulent charges, purchases and lines of credit would appear on the credit report, making it helpful for monitoring one’s identity. To request a free credit report, users need to visit AnnualCreditReport.com and enter their information. The report will be available for download almost immediately. For more information on how to request a report and why it is a useful tool, click here. If there are any signs of suspicious activity on the report—such as purchases, new credit cards or too many inquiries from lenders—consumers can contact the Identity Theft Resource Center via live-chat or toll-free at 888.400.5530.


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State and local governments around the country are working hard on plans, and in some cases, starting to execute, to carefully reopen their communities and businesses in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Data is being tracked; task forces are mobilizing and planning; and the “new normal” is beginning to take shape. However, this could lead to an increase in reopening job scams.

More jobs could be a welcomed sight for over 40 million U.S. workers who have had to file for unemployment benefits since mid-March. Some consumers expect to return to their old jobs. However, many others will be looking for a new one.

According to a survey issued by FlexJobs, 19 percent of respondents reported that they have already been victimized by an employment scam. The company further stated that for every legitimate work-from-home job—a highly sought-after option during the pandemic—there are between sixty and seventy scam offers. Out of concern for consumers, as they seek employment, the FBI is warning the public about reopening job scams or fake job offers that would ordinarily raise some red flags if not for the specific changes that quarantine has required.

The FBI says they have seen an uptick in fake job and hiring scams with cybercriminals posing as legitimate employers by spoofing company websites and posting fake job openings on popular online job boards. One of the scams involves fraudsters going as far as conducting false interviews with applicants, then requesting personal information or money that could be transferred to a private location. The Better Business Bureau told FOX 13 in Memphis that fraudsters are using the COVID-19 pandemic in their employment scams to make them more believable.

Fortunately, much of the same caution that applied to job-seeking before COVID-19 still applies. Consumers should know the source of the job listing and only use reputable websites to find employment opportunities. To avoid a reopening job scam, consumers should also be mindful of unsolicited emails and offers with outrageous claims—such as, “Earn $3,000 a week working from home.”

Once a job posting is found, consumers should also be careful about how much personal data they share, at least during the application period. If a company claims they want to do a phone, Skype or Zoom interview due to social distancing and safety, that’s okay. However, it does not mean candidates should turn over information like their Social Security numbers until they have been hired.

Finally, to avoid a job reopening scam, consumers should remember that legitimate jobs don’t usually require any upfront fees or costs. Even things like company uniforms or specialized equipment such as steel-toed shoes are often deducted from the first paycheck or purchased by the employee through an outside company. Typically, they are not charged in the form of a payment. If an employer asks for a finder’s fee, administrative fee, background check fee or any other funds, it is probably a reopening job scam. Even for legitimate actions like submitting a bank account number and routing number for direct depositing of paychecks, it’s important to be sure the company is legitimate and the job has already been awarded before submitting the information. If someone believes they are victim to a COVID-19 reopening job scam, they can live-chat with an Identity Theft Resource Center expert advisor. They can also call toll-free at 888.400.5530.


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