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Data Privacy Day is an international effort to empower individuals and business to respect privacy, safeguard data and enable trust.

Many of today’s tech users have never navigated an online world where they weren’t constantly asked to provide personal details about themselves for everything from booking a doctor’s appointment to buying a new shirt. Too many tech users don’t do enough to protect their online privacy and secure their data, while also thinking that it’s “other people” who don’t protect themselves.

This is a trend that Data Privacy Day works to address. The Identity Theft Resource Center is the non-profit partner for this event, hosted on January 28th, 2019, by StaySafeOnline. Powered by the National Cyber Security Alliance, the upcoming event will focus on the changing privacy landscape and what that means for consumers, businesses, policymakers, and more.

The change is so rapid, in fact, that StaySafeOnline is referring to this age as a new era in privacy, and as such, the event will feature a wide variety of instructional sessions led by some of the top names in the field. With events available for both in-person attendees and live stream participants, Data Privacy Day stands to be a source of vital information to kick off the new year with a focus on security.

Of course, there are actionable steps that every tech user can implement right now to help secure their personally identifiable information and protect their privacy:

1. Understand—and put in place—good password hygiene.

2. Establish a family or company policy on how to respond to suspicious messages and what steps to take in the event of a possible privacy incident.

3. Install strong, trustworthy security software that helps block or delete attempted privacy threats.

4. Think twice about oversharing, whether it’s posting too much information on social media, responding to emails asking for identifying details, or handing over your data to third-parties.

5. Seek out the vulnerabilities that may already be a threat, like third-party apps, unsecure privacy settings in your social media accounts, software and operating systems that haven’t been updated regularly, and more.

Can’t be there in person? Watch live from LinkedIn, SF! ITRC CEO, Eva Velasquez will be joining privacy experts on the panel, “The Future of Privacy and Breakthrough Technologies” to discuss advances in technology, such as artificial intelligence to the human body acting as the computer interface, how privacy will take on even greater significance. Panelists will highlight why our actions now will drive tomorrow’s outcomes.

Just released – Download the 2018 End-of-Year Data Breach Report


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Read next: Consumers at Risk: 126% Increase in Exposed Consumer Data, 1.68 Billion Email-Related Credentials

Ah, another year has passed and we’re ready to jump into the future of 2019. First, let’s take a look back at our predictions from 2018 that came true. We discussed the potential of AI to stop hacking, scammer’s new techniques to take advantage of social media users and transparency in IoT devices.  Of course with the emergence of technology and cybercriminals evolving their techniques, unanticipated challenges have arisen.

2019’s focus will be on data: Data breaches, data abuses, data privacy.  Even though ITRC is first and foremost a victim service and consumer education organization, we know that the thieves need our data in order to perpetrate their fraud and identity theft.

Data breaches: Consumers will gain more clarity (about how a specific breach actually effects them.  Breached entities will be pushed to be more transparent and less vague about the specifics of the type of data that has been breached.  Vague terms such as “and other data” or “client records”, that appear on data breach notification letter currently will no longer be tolerated by breach victims. Thieves are always looking to get their hands on our data and with a little technique called “credential cracking,” we think we’re going to be seeing more security notifications, not just breach notifications in 2019. Here’s what’s going on: following a large-scale data breach, and in order to gain access to your online accounts, a hacker simply uses a large database of usernames and allows the computer to “guess” the passwords for each account they are attempting to log into. We’re beginning to see companies send security notifications to their customers that their username/email credentials are being used – possibly by an unauthorized user – to login to their platform even if there is no account (i.e. Warby Parker & Dunkin Donuts).

Data Abuses: The public will gain more insights into data abuses, not just breaches.  More incidents, like the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica event will come to light.  As we as consumers demand more transparency, and as regulators probe deeper, the ongoing act of using our data for other than the purpose for which we have given consent will come out of the shadows.  Consumers will also start paying more attention to the notifications they receive from businesses that say their information was shared with third parties and what that means for them.

Data Privacy:  Consumer empowerment around privacy and data privacy is top of mind in a way that it has never been before.  Other states will follow California’s lead and pass their own data privacy legislation in the hopes of empowering consumers and keeping industry in check. Especially seeing as California, Florida, Texas, New York and Pennsylvania (in that order) had the highest numbers of cybercrime reports last year.  This will likely not provide the much needed long term solution, or the necessary cultural shift.  Just look at the condition of the state by state data breach notification laws, and the years-long discussion (that’s at a stalemate by the way) of a more universal regulation and process.  Will we start that cycle over again here?  Probably. Until the public has a concrete understanding of the complex relationship between data creators (consumers), data owners (the platform on which the data was created, generally) and data users (every industry currently operating in the US) these statewide measures will fall short of making any real headway into actually giving us more control over our data or more privacy.

Even though it has been discussed for over 13 years, there is a good chance that 2019 will be the year that a federal data breach notification law will become a reality.  Of course, predictions are just an educated guess based on previous events and information. Industry, policymakers and the public alike will have to wait and see how 2019 will be impacted by identity theft, cybercrime, hacking and data breaches. One thing we can be sure of though is that the ITRC will be here, working to fight back against the latest techniques to commit identity theft and scams.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


Read next: The 2018 Impact of Data Breaches and Cybercrime

With the record-setting numbers of data breaches and compromised consumer records, you might think becoming a victim is inevitable. If you can’t control whether or not someone breaks into a major network or leaves a vast database of customer data unsecured online, then you can’t control things like identity theft, either…right?

Not exactly. Obviously, preventing large-scale data breaches is out of the consumers’ hands, and there are treasure troves of stolen credentials available to criminals on the dark web. But that kind of activity isn’t the only way that individuals’ information is leaked online. Sometimes, our everyday tech behaviors can put our personal identifiable information and financial information at risk of theft.

Data Privacy Day (DPD), officially hosted the National Cybersecurity Alliance is an international effort held annually on Jan. 28 to create awareness about the importance of respecting privacy, safeguarding data and enabling trust.

There is perhaps no better way to kick off your new year than by taking part in the various events surrounding this important day. You can get involved by sharing content with a local group at a community center, get a better understanding of the issues, or simply setting aside some time in your day to take stock of your own cybersecurity strengths and weaknesses.

Of course, you don’t have to wait to begin working towards better data protection. You can start right now with things like:

Some things might be out of your hands, but that doesn’t mean throw in the towel. Your information very well could be “out there,” but getting a good sense of your data privacy and protecting it to the best of your ability can reduce your risk of additional cybercrimes.

For more information, check out the full Data Privacy Day resource guide by the NCSA.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.