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CashApp scams have seen an uptick since COVID-19 began impacting the United States. In April, we wrote about scammers out in full force trying to get consumers to fall for CashApp scams by clicking on fraudulent and malicious links that could steal people’s money and identity, taking advantage of the economic hardships. Now, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) is receiving multiple calls and live-chats about a twist on the CashApp scam: a CashApp customer support scam.

Who Is Targeted

CashApp users

What It Is

A CashApp customer support scam where scammers act as CashApp customer support on a hotline to gain access to users CashApp accounts or ask users to download software to allow remote access to their mobile device.

What They Are After

Scammers are after money and personal information using a fake customer support hotline. In one CashApp scam case reported to the ITRC, a scammer stole all of the victim’s money and changed their username and password. In another case, a scammer was able to get a hold of the victim’s bank account number and access the victim’s bank account.

How You Can Avoid It

  • As of right now, CashApp only offers customer service via email or through the app, not by telephone. Reach out to customer support directly through the company’s website or app.
  • Never give out personal information over the phone if you do not know who is on the other end.
  • Do not download software to allow third parties to have access to any of your mobile devices.
  • Only use CashApp to transfer money to people you know.
  • Add additional security measures, including multi-factor authentication.

If you think you may have fallen victim to a CashApp customer support scam, you can call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat with an expert advisor on the company website.


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With some businesses opening back up after temporarily closing due to the COVID-19 pandemic, scammers are trying to capitalize using online job scams to steal people’s personal information.

Recently, Scripps Health found hackers exploiting job seekers through phishing emails with Scripps Health-themed “lures.” Scripps sent the following email to warn their community members:

Image provided to the Identity Theft Resource Center by public

ATA Engineering, another San Diego-based company, reports they also are seeing similar-type online job scams.

The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has seen a rise in victims contacting the organization about online job scams, including phishing emails. Some of the particular job scams reported to the ITRC include ones from Indeed, Zip Recruiter, and Facebook. The ITRC has had more than 40 victims reach out about online job scams the last three months.

Who Is It Targeting

People looking for work amist the COVID-19 pandemic

What Is It

Either a fake listing posted on a job board or a phishing email, robocall, social media message, or text message looking for a response.

What Are They After

While scammers attack in different ways, they are all looking for one thing: personal information. They hope they can trick people who are desperate or vulnerable into giving up sensitive data like usernames and passwords, financial data, or Social Security numbers. Once scammers have that information, they can commit many different forms of identity theft.

How You Can Avoid It

  • Never click on a link or open an attachment from an email you are not expecting. Instead, go directly to the source to verify the validity of the message.
  • Review all emails and websites carefully to make sure there are no suspicious addresses, subject lines or URLs.
  • Be careful about how much personal data you share, at least during the application process. Do not turn over information like your Social Security number until you are hired.
  • Make sure you have the job, and it is legitimate, before giving away financial information like a bank account number or routing number for direct depositing of paychecks.

If you think you may have fallen victim to an online job scam, you can call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat with an expert advisor on the company website.


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The coronavirus is making a lasting impact on the United States in many different ways. More than 175,000 people have died from the coronavirus, and 57+ million Americans have filed for unemployment. Another noticeable impact is the dramatic increase in scams and identity theft. There have been more than 92,000 COVID-19 fraud reports and $118+ million lost from fraud, according to the Federal Trade Commission. A story published by the Washington Post reports that no event over the last decade has spawned as many schemes or lasted this long.

Since COVID-19 began seriously affecting the U.S. in March, fraudsters and scammers have been trying to take advantage of the situation to steal or misuse people’s personally identifiable information (PII) in any way possible to commit identity theft. Recently, scammers have been taking advantage of the medical space to commit financial identity theft from COVID-19, using many different methods.

Medicare and Medicaid Scams

There is some good news when it comes to COVID-19 scams. COVID-related phishing scams appear to be on the decline. According to CheckPoint, July saw a 50 percent decrease in COVID-19 scams compared to June. However, CheckPoint reported that COVID-19 medical and vaccine-related scams are still in high demand as the race is on to find a vaccine. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General (HHS-OIG) echoes a similar message. The HHS-OIG says scammers are offering tests to Medicare beneficiaries in exchange for PII, like Medicare and Medicaid information to commit financial identity theft.

The AMAC Foundation is so concerned about the current issue that they and Medicare.gov are sending a notice warning recipients of the scams. The HHS-OIG believes fraudsters are targeting recipients with telemarketing calls, text messages, social media messages and door-to-door visits in their effort to steal PII. PII can be used to bill Federal health care and commit financial identity theft fraudulently.

Insurance Scams

Insurance scams are another financial identity theft concern from COVID-19 with telemedicine being so widely available, as mentioned by the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud. The Coalition warns that costly insurance scams can exploit the burgeoning arms-length telemedicine. Tele-schemes can steal patients’ identities and defraud their insurance policies.

Medical Identity Theft Threat

While fraudsters are using the medical space to commit financial identity theft from COVID-19, there is also a risk of medical identity theft. According to a story published by CBS Dallas, hackers know more people are using the healthcare system, and they know they can take advantage of the situation.

If hackers get their hands on medical records, it could leave a lasting impact. The Senior Director of Threat Hunting and Intelligence at Binary Defense says someone who steals a victim’s identity can go as far as getting an expensive medical procedure done and charge it to the victim’s insurance account. The story suggests consumers give out the bare minimum amount of PII at medical appointments, ensure the provider’s online portals are secure, and ask providers to delete all of their medical records from the database once they are no longer a patient to help reduce their risk of falling victim to identity theft.

What You Can Do

Scammers are using Medicare and Medicaid scams, insurance scams, and a rise in people using the healthcare system to commit identity theft – particularly financial identity theft from COVID-19. However, there are still actions you can take to reduce your risk of falling victim to a COVID-19 scam or financial identity theft.

  • Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries should be cautious of any unsolicited requests for Medicare or Medicaid numbers
  • Keep an eye out for unexpected calls or messages that ask for PII. If someone receives a message with a link or an attachment, do not click or open anything. (NOTE: A physician or trusted health care provider will approve any COVID-19 tests or treatments.)
  • Anyone suspicious of COVID-19 healthcare fraud should report it online to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General or call 800.HHS.TIPS

If you are the victim of financial identity theft from COVID-19, or a COVID-19 scam, you can call the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530. You can also live-chat on our website to speak with an expert advisor.


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Being Able to Identify a Phishing Attack is More Important Now Than Ever

Netflix Email Phishing Scam Could Steal Credit Card Information

Hacked Dating Apps are a Popular Target for Social Engineering Scams

A recent data breach of Dave, an online banking service, has users of the service searching for answers. Hackers often target digital banking services for their plethora of consumer records. In 2018, hackers leaked the information of 2.8 billion consumer data records, costing $654 billion in damages to U.S. organizations. Additionally, since the start of COVID-19, there has been a 50 percent increase in mobile banking. Dave is a fintech company that allows users to link their bank accounts and loan payments for upcoming bills to avoid overdraft fees. The Dave.com data breach occurred after the company’s third-party service provider, Waydev, was breached, allowing hackers access to over seven million users’ data.

What Happened

Dave suffered an attack, resulting in 7,516,625 user records being published on RAID, a hacker forum. Some of the information that was exposed from the Dave.com data breach included names, emails, birth dates, physical addresses, phone numbers, encrypted Social Security numbers and Bcrypt hashed passwords. The company uncovered the hacker’s access point into the database and has since notified customers of the exposure. After becoming aware of the incident, Dave enlisted law enforcement and the FBI to conduct an ongoing investigation, according to ZDNet.

What Does This Mean for You?

While there is no evidence that hackers have used the data from the Dave.com data breach to gain access to accounts or conduct any unlawful actions, there is still a lot of harm that could potentially be done. One threat is social engineering, where someone manipulates someone else into divulging personal information. Since multiple forms of information were exposed, there is an even higher and potentially more harmful risk for those impacted.

While the threat level is not as high as social engineering, hackers could also target victims with mail-forwarding and sign up for accounts with the victim’s information.

Next Steps to Take

Affected users of Dave should consider taking immediate action to minimize the risks of identity theft. Some important next steps include:

  • Change the usernames and passwords on any accounts that share a username and password with their Dave.com account – opt for a stronger, unique passphrase
  • Look out for account sign-ups and websites which they are not familiar
  • Avoid clicking on any links or opening any attachments in messages they are not expecting or giving out personal information on the phone. Instead, users should reach out directly to verify the validity of the message.

Anyone affected by the Dave.com data breach can call the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) toll-free at 888.400.5530 for more information on the next steps they need to take. They can also live-chat with an expert advisor. Finally, victims should consider downloading the free ID Theft Help app for access to resources, a case log to track their activities in managing their data breach case and much more.

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Another week has gone by, and in this week’s Weekly Breach Breakdown, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) highlights a handful of data compromises that could leave a big impact on businesses and consumers. The ITRC has been tracking publicly-notified U.S. data breaches since 2005 to look for patterns, new trends and any information that could better help educate on the need for understanding the value of protecting personally identifiable information (PII). Some of the data compromises highlighted this week include CVS, Walgreens and Walmart pharmacy data breaches with a unique twist; an athlete recruiting tool; and one state’s taxpayer system. All of these breaches have one thing in common: they are relatively small data events that can still leave a lasting impact.

CVS, Walgreens and Walmart Pharmacy Data Breaches

Three well-known companies suffered from individual pharmacy data breaches. It wasn’t a cyberattack or failure to secure their electronic records; instead, some of their stored health information was physically stolen, leaving the potential for a serious impact on the individuals whose information was exposed. During recent protests in several cities, pharmacies owned by Walmart, Walgreens and CVS were looted. Paper files and computer equipment containing customer information was taken from individual stores, not the companies at-large. The missing information included prescriptions, consent forms, birth dates, addresses, medications and physician information. All three companies affected by the pharmacy data breaches notified impacted patients, but only CVS released the number of customers involved – 21,289.

Front Rush Data Compromise

The next data compromise includes student-athlete recruiting tool, Front Rush. Front Rush recently notified 61,000 athletes and coaches that their information was open to the internet due to a misconfigured cloud database for four years. In a notice to individuals impacted, Front Rush acknowledged that they could not tell if anyone accessed or removed any PII while it was exposed to the web from 2016-2020. Some of the personal information in the database included: Social Security numbers, Driver’s Licenses, student IDs, passports, financial accounts, credit card information, birth certificates and health insurance information.

The Vermont Department of Taxes Data Compromise

The state of Vermont recently notified more than 70,000 taxpayers that the online credentials they used to file certain types of tax forms had been exposed on the internet since 2017. State officials say they lacked the tools to tell if the information was downloaded from their systems by threat actors, but they believe the risk of an identity crime is low. However, the State Department of Taxes is recommending taxpayers take precautions like monitoring bank and credit accounts, reviewing credit reports and reporting any suspicious activity to local law enforcement.

What it Means

Stolen credentials like logins and passwords, like the information breached in Vermont, are currently the number one cause of data breaches, according to IBM. However, that is tied with misconfigured cloud security that leads to data being exposed to the web, as in Front Rush. Misconfigured cloud security generally means that someone forgot to set up a password or other security tool when they configured the database. Stolen physical records and devices ranks five out of ten on the attack scale for the most common attack vectors.

For more information about the latest data breaches, subscribe to the ITRC’s data breach newsletter.

NotifiedTM

Keep an eye out for the ITRC’s new data breach tracker NotifiedTM. It is updated daily and free to consumers. Businesses that need comprehensive breach information for business planning or due diligence can access as many as 90 data points through one of the ITRC’s three paid subscriptions. Subscriptions help ensure the ITRC’s free identity crime services stay free. Notified launches later this month.

If someone believes they are the victim of identity theft or their information has been compromised in a data breach, they can call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 to speak with an expert advisor. They can also use live-chat. Finally, victims of a data breach can download the free ID Theft Help app to access advisors, resources, a case log and much more. Join us on our weekly data breach podcast to get the latest perspectives on the last week in breaches. Subscribe to get it delivered on your preferred podcast platform.


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Being Able to Identify a Phishing Attack is More Important Now Than Ever

Netflix Email Phishing Scam Could Steal Credit Card Information

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Another week has gone by, a week full of interesting publicly-reported U.S. data compromises. This week on the Identity Theft Resource Center’s Weekly Breach Breakdown podcast, we are focusing on cyberattacks and data breaches that help us put a price tag on people’s personal information – including EDP Renewables’ ransomware attack, a Twitter data breach that exposed Slack user information and much more.

In the 1980s, hacking started to become a thing. For the most part, hackers were young, smart and motivated by the challenge of breaking into the phone company or the Pentagon. As the ITRC’s COO and podcast host James Lee says, “the payout was street credibility.” Today, hackers are known as threat actors, and they are looking to steal people’s personal information simply because they are motivated by greed. Stealing someone’s personal information is not so much about breaking into someone’s bank account as it is stealing users’ login and passwords from a company to dupe them into paying a fake invoice (from said company) or infecting a company’s systems with ransomware.

Earlier this year, security research firm SentinelOne estimated that ransomware cost U.S. companies $7.5 billion in 2019. That number is expected to increase because the average ransom paid is going up. According to Security Boulevard, in six months between October 2019 and March 2020, the average ransom payment went from $44,000 to more than $110,000 an attack.

Originally, data thieves were content with just locking up a company’s files and walking away if they did not get paid or releasing the files back to the company if they did. Now, however, cybercriminals specializing in ransomware are using more sophisticated attack software and bolder tactics. Attackers are downloading sensitive personal information before they notify their victims instead of just sending a ransom note after locking files, turning a basic cyber hold-up into a classic data breach.

This past week, EDP Renewables, a European energy company that serves 11 million customers in the U.S., confirmed they were the target of a ransomware attack with a $14 million price-tag. Customer information was breached as part of the attack. In ransomware attacks, like EDP Renewables, the stolen information is used as leverage to force companies to pay the attackers. EDP Renewables did not pay. The demands like the one in the EDP Renewables ransomware attack make it easy to calculate the value cybercriminals put on identity information.

Another way to tell the value of personal information is to look at the price data commands in one of the Dark Web’s illicit marketplaces – where stolen information and identities are commerce. Earlier in July, data thieves posted a database of customer information from Live Auctioneers, an auction website that allows people worldwide to bid on auctioned items in real-time. The complete set of 3.4 million records are for sale starting at $2,500.

However, not all data is as valuable as other pieces of information. For example, a credit or debit card could be worth as much as $11 or as little as $1. Workspace tool Slack is learning their user information is not as valuable to data thieves, at least right now. A recent Twitter data breach exposed Slack user information. According to security researchers at KELA Group, 17,000 Slack credentials from 12,000 company workspaces are for sale on the dark web for a little as $0.50 and as much as $300. Despite the cheap low rate, no one is taking advantage of the Slack data from the Twitter data breach – posts offering the Slack credentials are nearly a year old. The reasons why cybercriminals are interested in some data and not interested in other data can vary. However, right now, data thieves are not interested in the Slack user information; because as popular as Slack is with users and Wall Street, Slack channels are rarely filled with the kinds of information cybercriminals want.

For more information about the latest data breaches, people can subscribe to the ITRC’s data breach newsletter. Keep an eye out for the ITRC’s new data breach tool, NotifiedTM. It’s updated daily and free for consumers. Businesses that need access to comprehensive breach information for business planning or due diligence can subscribe to unlock as many as 90 data points through one of three paid tiers. Subscriptions help ensure the ITRC’s free identity crime services stay free. Notified launches in August.

If someone believes they are a victim of identity theft or have been impacted by a data breach, they can call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 to speak with an expert advisor. They can also use live-chat. Finally, victims of a data breach can download the free ID Theft Help app to access advisors, resources, a case log and much more.

Join us on our weekly data breach podcast to get the latest perspectives on the last week in breaches. Subscribe to get it delivered on your preferred podcast platform.

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