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Identity Theft Resource Center and Futurion unveil a new tool Breach Clarity for consumers impacted by data breaches 

LAS VEGAS, Mar 24, 2019 ­­– Today, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC), a national non-profit organization established to support victims of identity crime, and Futurion announced during the KNOW 2019 conference the launch of a new tool to empower victims of data breaches in decoding what breach notification means to them and how they can minimize the risk of identity theft and fraud. The ITRC, along with the tool’s creator Jim Van Dyke, announced Breach ClarityTM. Breach Clarity is the secret decoder that will allow consumers to decipher data breach risks, prioritize the right minimization actions and access ITRC advisors for additional help. Breach Clarity is a no-cost, online tool for consumers, meant to crack the often muddled and incomplete information that follows breach notification.

Consumers can utilize the tool at www.idtheftcenter.org/BreachClarity and begin decoding the effect of any data breach on their identity safety. Breach Clarity uses a proprietary algorithm to give a data breach a risk score based on unique variables, like amount and type of information exposed. The higher the risk score for a specific breach, the more negative consequences that breach can potentially have for an individual. Breach Clarity also unlocks the top potential harms and recommended action steps for a victim of each breach, eliminating confusion in a time-is-of-the-essence period for victims. Finally, the tool provides resources for consumers like risk minimization plans from ITRC for data breach and next steps toward remediation.

The most frequently asked question ITRC receives when assisting victims of data breach is, “But what does this actually mean to me?” The national non-profit strives to better assist and educate victims in determining if they should be worried and how the breach can affect them. Breach Clarity gives consumers the power to decode the harms of a data breach. After receiving a notification letter or getting information from a credible third-party like media sources, websites that provide security

information and other sources, a victim can enter the name of the breach they were affected by to decode what that breach means to his or her safety.

“Victims deserve answers, not vague language that covers up the true meaning of data breaches,” says president and CEO of ITRC Eva Velasquez. “We are thankful to have partners, like Jim Van Dyke, who are working to change the industry and bring clarity to victims. Breach Clarity is the first step toward empowering data breach victims and changing the scope of the industry.”

The Breach Clarity algorithm runs on the backbone of ITRC’s proprietary database of publicly available and notified breaches. Since data breaches – and fraud methods around them – often change quickly, Breach Clarity is a dynamic, evolving tool that updates as new information becomes available regarding breaches and fraud mechanisms.

“I’m delighted to work with the ITRC because we share a passion for protecting consumers,” says Jim Van Dyke, inventor of Breach Clarity. “In contrast with some who blame victims as being ‘apathetic’ or even ‘dumb’ when it comes to security, Breach Clarity is designed to empower every identity holder with the facts and help they need to minimize the risk of a data compromise leading to identity theft.”

Shortly following the launch of Breach Clarity, ITRC and Van Dyke will jointly offer webinars on how to use the tool and address questions from the public. Sign up for the first webinar about Breach Clarity at idtheft.center/BreachClarity. For financial institutions and employers, a premium version of Breach Clarity will be created to provide advanced capabilities such as an expanded list of risks and action steps for the consumer, integrated results from multiple breaches and methods for integrating to digital finance systems that further empower the consumer after a breach.

Attendees of the KNOW 2019 conference can join Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of ITRC (booth #121), Jim Van Dyke, founder of Futurion and creator of Breach Clarity, and James Ruotolo, director of product management and product marketing for the Fraud and Security Intelligence division at SAS, for a covert event Monday March 25th, 7-9pm. Register here or visit ITRC’s booth (#121) for more information, space is limited as this is a first come, first serve event. Thanks to SAS for their support of ITRC and underwriting the KNOW 2019 networking event.

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About the Identity Theft Resource Center®

Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity theft in resolving their cases, and to broaden public education and awareness in the understanding of identity theft, data breaches, cybersecurity, scams/fraud, and privacy issues. Through public and private support, ITRC provides no-cost victim assistance and consumer education through its call center, website, social media channels, live chat feature and ID Theft Help app. For more information, visit: http://www.idtheftcenter.org

About Futurion and Breach ClarityTM

Futurion is a research-based consultancy focused on consumer identity, digital commerce and financial services. Futurion’s CEO Jim Van Dyke formerly founded and led Javelin Strategy & Research and has also held various product management and board positions. Breach Clarity was created based on research of consumer identity crime victims and interviews with experts on the front line of fraud prevention at financial institutions, government agencies, payments networks and more. Breach Clarity’s basic outputs are free to all consumers at www.BreachClarity.com, with an upcoming premium version being designed for consumers who log into their secure personal account at licensing financial institutions and employers.

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Identity Theft Resource Center
Charity Lacey
VP of Communications
O: 858-634-6390
C: 619-368-4373
clacey@idtheftcenter.org

SAN DIEGO – Jan 14, 2019 – The Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC), a national non-profit organization established to support victims of identity crime, is available to assist victims during the Federal Government shutdown. Heading into its fourth week of federal agency closures, consumers continue to experience long-term consequences due to the aftermath of the lack of availability of integral government services. The ITRC, a trusted non-profit partner of the Federal Trade Commission and the Internal Revenue Service, can provide those that need immediate assistance help through their toll-free call center (888-400-5530) if they suspect they have fallen prey to identity theft or a scam.

The FTC announced that filing reports of fraud, scam and identity theft is suspended at this time – with not just the filing unavailable but necessary forms and informational resources are also offline. Always available to help consumers but especially during the current shutdown crisis, the ITRC provides valuable plans for victims to begin the remediation of an identity theft or fraud case as well as the necessary steps to take during the government shutdown to be prepared to provide the necessary agencies documents when they reopen. Advisors can also provide alternative remediation plans, where available, based on case specifics and the jurisdiction of the victim.

“The core of our mission is helping victims of identity crime and we know that given the Federal Government shutdown, our free services are needed now more than ever,” said Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of Identity Theft Resource Center. “Victims can use any of the available channels of communication for assistance not only during this time of uncertainty, but year round.”

Knowledgeable ITRC advisors can assist victims with any questions they have about identity crime, as well as help them appropriately plan for reporting an identity theft case, filing a scam or fraud complaint, setting victims up for success as soon as the relevant agencies reopen (FTC, IRS, Social Security Administration). Assistance includes one-on-one live help, forms and other resources, along with a detailed remediation plan for each victim’s unique case.

“In my role as ITRC’s chairman of the board, I have been able to experience the collaborative relationship between the FTC and ITRC,” said Matt Cullina, chairman of the board of the ITRC and CEO of CyberScout. “Both of these organizations have a mutual mission to provide victims access to resolve their identity theft cases, but work together to support each other. During this challenging time for both victims and the federal agencies impacted, it’s good to know that the ITRC is available to provide support in the wake of the shutdown.”

The ITRC provides identity theft victims with United States identity credentials assistance free of charge. An advisor will work with a victim to provide best-in-class assistance in compiling the necessary resources and documents, as well as offer step-by-step instructions on how best to remediate a case. Consumers can also receive information and assistance by visiting the Identity Theft Resource Center’s website at https://www.idtheftcenter.org/ and utilizing the “Live Chat” feature. The site also contains the necessary forms and fact sheets regarding identity theft. The free app from the ITRC, ID Theft Help, is available to manage your cases progress, get pertinent resources, contact a call center advisor and access information on how to protect your identity – for those that prefer a self-directed mobile application.

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About the Identity Theft Resource Center

Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity theft in resolving their cases, and to broaden public education and awareness in the understanding of identity theft, data breaches, cybersecurity, scams/fraud, and privacy issues. Through public and private support, the ITRC provides no-cost victim assistance and consumer education through its call center, website, social media channels, live chat feature and ID Theft Help. For more information, visit: http://www.idtheftcenter.org

Contact: Charity Lacey, VP of Communications

CLacey@idtheftcenter.org

o: 858-634-6390

c: 619-368-4373

For years, security experts and advocates have warned consumers about suspicious websites, specifically ones that take your sensitive information or payments. The best course of action? To look for the HTTPS designation in the web address at the top of the screen and the little padlock icon, both of which indicate a site can be trusted.

Unfortunately, scammers continue to evolve their ways to continue victimizing the public through technology. A new report has found that about 49% of known phishing websites—websites that steal your information after tricking you into submitting it—contain a secure designation and a little green padlock. The “look for the lock” advice that was once a sound way to protect yourself is a little less reliable than before.

Just as scammers have evolved, now it’s up to consumers to make some changes in order to protect themselves from the latest threats:

1. Install a security suite that offers anti-phishing and website security

A basic antivirus isn’t enough to keep you safe anymore, and a number of well-known security software developers have incorporated a lot of extra features. Some can alert you to a fake website or known scammer before you compromise your information. Even better, many security programs offer a wide range of subscription prices—even free plans—so there’s something to meet every budget.

2. Establish a throwaway email address

Some sites want nothing more than your email address so they can sell it to spammers. Generate a free email address that is separate from your everyday, commonly used one. Then, whenever you’re visiting websites that want your email address, you have the option to trust the site with your contact information or use your backup email address.

3. Designate a payment card for internet purchases

The last thing you need is for a phishing website to steal your money, but it happens. By intentionally having an “internet only” credit card that is not connected to your bank account and that has a very low credit limit, you may have an easier time protecting yourself from someone who steals your information.

The most important thing you can do is to remember that what was once considered top-notch security advice can change as new technology and new developments occur. It’s not enough to develop a good habit and never deviate from it. Instead, you need to stay informed by following ongoing coverage of the latest scams and frauds.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


Read next: “Secret Sisterhood” Online Gift Exchange Scam Alert

In the past few years, retailers have seen a trend in how their customers shopped for the holidays. More and more people have grown weary of standing in the cold or elbowing through thousands of shoppers to buy this year’s hot toy. Savvy shoppers have increasingly opted to stay home in their pajamas and find great deals online.

That’s led to the rise in Cyber Monday. Once the holiday chaos of Black Friday is out of the way, the following Monday is a time to pop over to the internet and see what sales are taking place to finish (or start!) your shopping.

Unfortunately, just like Black Friday, Cyber Monday is a favorite holiday for identity thieves, scammers and hackers. In order to reduce your risk of falling victim to the crime, you have to take some steps to secure your identity.

1. Know your antivirus software – Antivirus software has come a long way since the early days of trying to block malicious computer threats. Unfortunately, so have the tools that cybercriminals use to steal your money, your identity, your computer and more. A comprehensive security suite can now offer you protection from ransomware, trojans, worms, phishing scams, keyloggers and so much more. Many of them now include parental control tools, which is great if you have kids, as well as VPNs and tracking blockers for private browsing online.

Make sure your security suite is installed, updated and ready to protect you before you start entering your credit card details and your shipping address online.

2. Know your payment methods – Whether you’re using credit cards, debit cards, online payment platforms like PayPal, or gift cards, it’s important to keep up with which method you used on which website. That way, if there’s suspicious activity on your card or account later, you can trace it back to which site you may have used.

It’s also a good idea to know ahead of time what kinds of consumer protection are in place in case of fraud. Will your credit card company stand up for you if someone steals your information or racks up extra charges? Will they protect you if the website you used was a scam and they never send your purchases? Find out the rules and regulations—as well as what kinds of money-saving deals and discounts, if any—are in place before you use it.

3. Know what you’re clicking – Fake websites, copycat websites that look like real retailers’ sites, and bogus ads that only lead to click-revenue are the bane of every shopper’s existence at this time of year. Look for the site’s HTTPS designation before you enter any payment details, and make sure this is a reputable company before you pay for anything. A quick Google search for the name of the company or a check of the BBB’s scam tracker can tell you if there are any dissatisfied customers out there.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Read next: “I’ve Hacked Your Password” Scam

Identity theft is commonly associated with the damage it can do to victims’ finances, especially if the thief racked up tremendous debt. The countless new credit cards, the cars or houses, the new utilities turned on in apartments the victim didn’t rent can all lead to six-figure debt before they even know their identity was stolen.

There’s another serious threat to identity theft victims, one that may be just as harmful, and that’s the emotional toll this crime can take. This side effect can easily be overlooked at first by both the victim and their family members or friends. Worse, outsiders might even treat this side of identity theft as a non-issue, diminishing the feelings of loss, mistrust and even paranoia that victims can feel.

Each year, the Identity Theft Resource Center conducts an in-depth study of ID theft victims who’ve reached out to the organization during the year for help. The study is based on voluntary feedback to a comprehensive set of questions in order to get a better look at the trends and the lasting effects of this crime. The resulting ITRC Aftermath report is then made available to the public, including law enforcement, policymakers and other stakeholders, in order to provide accurate information from the victims’ standpoint.

Year after year, respondents to the ITRC Aftermath survey list some understandable emotional harm as a result of the crime. They’re often left feeling hopeless to resolve their cases and have a generally negative sentiment about their ability to recover. More than 85 percent have stated that they’ve felt worried, anger and frustration and another 83 percent are left feeling violated. Even worse, almost 70 percent of victims say they don’t think they can trust anyone and that they now fear for their safety. Almost as many victims reported that they feel powerless or helpless, while the majority of them are left feeling sad, depressed and betrayed.

Part of the hopelessness and paranoia may stem from all the ways that identity theft leaves its mark. More than 30 percent of the victims who responded said the crime caused them problems at work, either with their employers or with those they work with, while eight percent said it affected them at school with either the administration or other students. Some victims actually lost out on employment opportunities or even lost their jobs because someone had stolen their identity and used it in a way that came back on the victim. Some of the victims had their paychecks or their insurance benefits withheld due to the incidents, causing severe financial harm and the obvious distress that goes along with it. It’s easy to see how the financial turmoil can seem minor in comparison to the emotional upheaval. Money problems can be resolved, even if it takes time, but thinking that someone is using your good name to break the law is an endless kind of hurt. Knowing that your family members or coworkers think you’re a thief or an irresponsible consumer can break even the most solid bonds. It’s important that all consumers understand the aftermath of identity theft in order to be prepared, both financially and emotionally, should it happen to them or someone they care about.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Download now: The Aftermath®: The Non-Economic Impacts of Identity Theft