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The IDSA shares with the ITRC in the newest Fraudian Slip podcast exploring identity management & the future of identity

  • This week, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) celebrated Identity Management Day, hosted by the Identity Defined Security Alliance (IDSA). The day raised awareness on the importance of identity management, securing digital identities and sharing best practices to help organizations and consumers.
  • The ITRC sat down with the IDSA to discuss how identity management has changed, the future of identity, how identity crimes are changing and much more.
  • To learn more, listen to this week’s episode of The Fraudian Slip
  • You can also learn more about the identity-related crimes discussed in the podcast and how to protect yourself from identity fraud and compromises by visiting the ITRC’s website.
  • If you think you are the victim of an identity crime or your identity has been compromised, you can call us, chat live online, send an email or leave a voice mail for an expert advisor to get advice on how to respond. Just visit www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.

Below is a transcript of our podcast with special guest Julie Smith, Executive Director of the Identity Defined Security Alliance

Welcome to The Fraudian Slip, the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC) podcast, where we talk about all-things identity compromise, crime and fraud that impact people and businesses. 

This month, April, we’re going to talk about one of the hottest topics in the world of cybersecurity, privacy and identity. Namely, the shift from what we think of as traditional identity theft to what is increasingly more common today – identity-based fraud.

As more organizations analyze their 2020 data and information from the first three months of 2021, there is a common theme. Cybercriminals are less interested in mass attacks seeking to scoop up as much information as possible about consumers. Instead, data thieves are focusing on attacking organizations where they can hold data for ransom, or where an attack against a single company can yield information from all the customers who rely on the breached business.

At the core of many of these attacks are identity credentials, little pieces of information that once upon a time was pretty much limited to your driver’s license, Social Security number and occasionally your mother’s maiden name. Today, identity credentials are everything from your login and password, which is more valuable than your credit card information to a cybercriminal, to the location where you use your smartphone.

The complexity of identity today makes it simultaneously more difficult to protect your identity while also making it easier to prove you are who you say you are.

This week we celebrated Identity Management Day to raise awareness of the importance of identity management, securing digital identities and sharing best practices to help organizations and consumers. Be Identity Smart. 

Identity Defined Security Alliance (IDSA) hosted the day.

We talked with Executive Director of IDSA Julie Smith about the following:

  • The IDSA, its members, and issues
  • How identity management has changed
  • A businesses role in managing and protecting consumer identities; the most important actions to take
  • The future of identity

We also talked with ITRC CEO Eva Velasquez about the following: 

  • How identity crimes are changing
  • Consumer self-management and protection; the most important actions to take
  • The future of identity

For answers to all of these questions, listen to this week’s episode of The Fraudian Slip Podcast

Contact the ITRC or IDSA

You can learn more about data privacy, cybersecurity, the future of identity and other identity-related issues by visiting the ITRC’s website www.idtheftcenter.org. If you want to learn more about the IDSA and its work, you can visit www.idsalliance.org.

If you have questions about how to protect your personal information, or if you believe you have been the victim of an identity crime or compromise, talk to one of our expert advisers on the phone (888.400.5530), by live-chat or by email during normal business hours (6 a.m.-5 p.m. PST). Just visit www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.

Be sure and join us next week for our Weekly Breach Breakdown podcast and next month for another episode of The Fraudian Slip.

  • According to a report from Javelin Strategies, traditional identity theft is declining. However, what one might think of as identity theft is being replaced by identity fraud.
  • trend identified by the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) in 2020. Cybercriminals continue to move away from mass data breaches of consumer information to more targeted attacks like phishing, ransomware and supply chain attacks.
  • There is no reason for consumers to panic. One record exposed is one too many, but one can’t determine the risk represented by a data breach based on the size of the breach. Knowing what records are exposed is far more important than how many records are compromised.
  • To learn about recent data breaches, consumers and businesses should visit the ITRC’s new data breach tracking tool, notified. 
  • For more information, or if someone believes they are the victim of identity theft, consumers can contact the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 or via live-chat on the company website www.idtheftcenter.org.

The Path is Smooth That Leadeth on to Danger

Welcome to the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC) Weekly Breach Breakdown for April 2, 2021. Each week, we look at the most recent and interesting events and trends related to data security and privacy. Last week we talked about the FBI’s most recent cybercrime report that shows an exponential increase in cybercrime and the losses associate with it. This week we look at how people can assess what that really means for them or their business.

In his poem, Adonis and Venus, Shakespeare wrote, “The path is smooth that leadeth on to danger.” That is the title of this week’s episode, reflecting how our desire for convenience often leads to risky behaviors.

Traditional Identity Theft is on the Decline

Let’s start with a good and bad news trend. A report from Javelin Strategies is the latest to show that “traditional identity theft” is declining. That’s good news. However, here is the “but” people may be expecting: what we think of as identity theft is being replaced by identity fraud.

Identity Fraud Cases Are on the Rise

What does that mean? It’s part of the general trend we’ve discussed where cybercriminals move away from mass data breaches of consumer information to more targeted attacks. Phishing, ransomware and supply chain attacks are good examples of the kinds of exploits that allow criminals to hit a company. The criminals reap hundreds of thousands of dollars from a single organization instead of the old-school way of attacking thousands of consumers.

However, less risk to individuals is not the same as low or no risk. In fact, the whole concept of identity fraud is based on using consumer behaviors to lure people into a scam. Maybe it’s a text that says someone’s Amazon account has been frozen, and the user needs to click on a link to verify their password to unlock it – and they do. They have just given them their login and password, which regulars of the podcast know are 10x more valuable to a data thief than a consumer’s credit card information.

Maybe someone gets an email from Google or Microsoft claiming their payment card is about to expire. All the user needs to click on is a link to log in and update their information. However, the email and login webpage are deep fakes, and the user just shared their login, password and credit card information with criminals.

All of these phishing techniques are predicated on our behaviors as humans, the need to instantly address any issue that appears by text or email in the most convenient way possible.

While different research reports come up with different identity fraud case totals, they all agree it is on the rise, and the dollar value starts with a B, as in billions. Right now, one might be thinking, “Well, that’s just great. Do I panic now or panic later?”

No Reason for Consumers to Panic

First, there is no reason to panic at all. People may have seen a media headline that talked about more records being exposed in data breaches in 2020 than in the past 15 years combined. While that is attention-grabbing, it’s not particularly meaningful.

One record exposed is one too many, but the reality is one can’t determine the risk represented by a data breach based on the size of the breach. Someone’s date of birth and Social Security number are two records. They may have been exposed thousands of times over the past 15 years, but they are still only two data points, and they don’t change.  However, the risk associated with each data point is very different.

Knowing what records are exposed is far more important than how many records are compromised. Knowing how to protect your own information is the most important information, and that’s where the ITRC can help.

Contact the ITRC

If anyone has questions about keeping their personal information private and how to protect it, they can visit www.idtheftcenter.org, where they will find helpful tips on these and many other topics. 

If someone thinks they have been the victim of an identity crime or a data breach and needs help figuring out what to do next, they should contact us. People can speak with an expert advisor on the phone, chat live on the web, or exchange emails during our normal business hours (6 a.m.-5 p.m. PST). Visit www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.  

Be sure to check out the most recent episode of our sister podcast, The Fraudian Slip. We will be back next week with another episode of the Weekly Breach Breakdown.