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Identity Theft Resource Center and Futurion unveil a new tool Breach Clarity for consumers impacted by data breaches 

LAS VEGAS, Mar 24, 2019 ­­– Today, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC), a national non-profit organization established to support victims of identity crime, and Futurion announced during the KNOW 2019 conference the launch of a new tool to empower victims of data breaches in decoding what breach notification means to them and how they can minimize the risk of identity theft and fraud. The ITRC, along with the tool’s creator Jim Van Dyke, announced Breach ClarityTM. Breach Clarity is the secret decoder that will allow consumers to decipher data breach risks, prioritize the right minimization actions and access ITRC advisors for additional help. Breach Clarity is a no-cost, online tool for consumers, meant to crack the often muddled and incomplete information that follows breach notification.

Consumers can utilize the tool at www.idtheftcenter.org/BreachClarity and begin decoding the effect of any data breach on their identity safety. Breach Clarity uses a proprietary algorithm to give a data breach a risk score based on unique variables, like amount and type of information exposed. The higher the risk score for a specific breach, the more negative consequences that breach can potentially have for an individual. Breach Clarity also unlocks the top potential harms and recommended action steps for a victim of each breach, eliminating confusion in a time-is-of-the-essence period for victims. Finally, the tool provides resources for consumers like risk minimization plans from ITRC for data breach and next steps toward remediation.

The most frequently asked question ITRC receives when assisting victims of data breach is, “But what does this actually mean to me?” The national non-profit strives to better assist and educate victims in determining if they should be worried and how the breach can affect them. Breach Clarity gives consumers the power to decode the harms of a data breach. After receiving a notification letter or getting information from a credible third-party like media sources, websites that provide security

information and other sources, a victim can enter the name of the breach they were affected by to decode what that breach means to his or her safety.

“Victims deserve answers, not vague language that covers up the true meaning of data breaches,” says president and CEO of ITRC Eva Velasquez. “We are thankful to have partners, like Jim Van Dyke, who are working to change the industry and bring clarity to victims. Breach Clarity is the first step toward empowering data breach victims and changing the scope of the industry.”

The Breach Clarity algorithm runs on the backbone of ITRC’s proprietary database of publicly available and notified breaches. Since data breaches – and fraud methods around them – often change quickly, Breach Clarity is a dynamic, evolving tool that updates as new information becomes available regarding breaches and fraud mechanisms.

“I’m delighted to work with the ITRC because we share a passion for protecting consumers,” says Jim Van Dyke, inventor of Breach Clarity. “In contrast with some who blame victims as being ‘apathetic’ or even ‘dumb’ when it comes to security, Breach Clarity is designed to empower every identity holder with the facts and help they need to minimize the risk of a data compromise leading to identity theft.”

Shortly following the launch of Breach Clarity, ITRC and Van Dyke will jointly offer webinars on how to use the tool and address questions from the public. Sign up for the first webinar about Breach Clarity at idtheft.center/BreachClarity. For financial institutions and employers, a premium version of Breach Clarity will be created to provide advanced capabilities such as an expanded list of risks and action steps for the consumer, integrated results from multiple breaches and methods for integrating to digital finance systems that further empower the consumer after a breach.

Attendees of the KNOW 2019 conference can join Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of ITRC (booth #121), Jim Van Dyke, founder of Futurion and creator of Breach Clarity, and James Ruotolo, director of product management and product marketing for the Fraud and Security Intelligence division at SAS, for a covert event Monday March 25th, 7-9pm. Register here or visit ITRC’s booth (#121) for more information, space is limited as this is a first come, first serve event. Thanks to SAS for their support of ITRC and underwriting the KNOW 2019 networking event.

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About the Identity Theft Resource Center®

Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity theft in resolving their cases, and to broaden public education and awareness in the understanding of identity theft, data breaches, cybersecurity, scams/fraud, and privacy issues. Through public and private support, ITRC provides no-cost victim assistance and consumer education through its call center, website, social media channels, live chat feature and ID Theft Help app. For more information, visit: http://www.idtheftcenter.org

About Futurion and Breach ClarityTM

Futurion is a research-based consultancy focused on consumer identity, digital commerce and financial services. Futurion’s CEO Jim Van Dyke formerly founded and led Javelin Strategy & Research and has also held various product management and board positions. Breach Clarity was created based on research of consumer identity crime victims and interviews with experts on the front line of fraud prevention at financial institutions, government agencies, payments networks and more. Breach Clarity’s basic outputs are free to all consumers at www.BreachClarity.com, with an upcoming premium version being designed for consumers who log into their secure personal account at licensing financial institutions and employers.

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Identity Theft Resource Center
Charity Lacey
VP of Communications
O: 858-634-6390
C: 619-368-4373
clacey@idtheftcenter.org

SAN DIEGO – Jan 28, 2019 – The Identity Theft Resource Center®, a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity crime, and CyberScout®, a full-spectrum identity, privacy and data security services firm, released the 2018 End-of-Year Data Breach Report.

According to the report, the number of U.S. data breaches tracked in 2018 decreased from last year’s all-time high of 1,632 breaches by 23 percent (or 1,244 breaches), but the reported number of consumer records exposed containing sensitive personally identifiable information jumped 126 percent from the 197,612,748 records exposed in 2017 to 446,515,334 records this past year.

“The increased exposure of sensitive consumer data is serious,” said Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center. “Never has there been more information out there putting consumers in harm’s way. ITRC continues to help victims and consumers by providing guidance on the best ways to navigate the dangers of identity theft to which these exposures give rise.”

Another critical finding was the number of non-sensitive records compromised, not included in the above totals, an additional 1.68 billion exposed records. While email-related credentials are not considered sensitive personally identifiable information, a majority of consumers use the same username/email and password combinations across multiple platforms creating serious vulnerability.

“When it comes to cyber hygiene, email continues to be the Achilles Heel for the average consumer,” said CyberScout founder and chair, Adam Levin. “There are many strategies consumers can use to minimize their exposure, but the takeaway from this year’s report is clear: Breaches are the third certainty in life, and constant vigilance is the only solution.”
To download the 2018 End-of-Year Data Breach Report, visit: idtheftcenter.org/2018-end-of-year-data-breach-report/

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About the Identity Theft Resource Center:

Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity theft in resolving their cases, and to broaden public education and awareness in the understanding of identity theft, data breaches, cybersecurity, scams/fraud, and privacy issues. Through public and private support, the ITRC provides no-cost victim assistance and consumer education through its call center, website, social media channels, live chat feature and ID Theft Help. For more information, visit: http://www.idtheftcenter.org

About CyberScout:
Since 2003, CyberScout® has set the standard for full-spectrum identity, privacy and data security services, offering proactive protection, employee benefits, education, resolution, identity management and consulting as well as breach preparedness and response programs.

CyberScout products and services are offered globally by 660 client partners to more than 17.5 million households worldwide, and CyberScout is the designated identity theft services provider for more than 750,000 businesses through cyber insurance policies. CyberScout combines extensive experience with high-touch service to help individuals, government, nonprofit and commercial clients minimize risk and maximize recovery.

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Identity Theft Resource Center
Charity Lacey
VP of Communications
O: 858-634-6390
C: 619-368-4373
clacey@idtheftcenter.org

CyberScout
Lelani Clark
VP of Communications
O: 646-649-5766
C: 347-204-9297
lelani@adamlevin.com

The federal government shutdown is affecting hundreds of thousands of employees and their families, but other victims stand to be harmed as well. While the government and its agencies handle the employees and continued services for the duration, criminals have been busy contacting consumers with plausible shutdown-related scams.

One law enforcement agency has already alerted area residents to a Medicare scam related to the shutdown. Callers posing as government employees contact random citizens and claim their Medicare (and conceivably Medicaid as well) coverage will be suspended during the shutdown unless the would-be victim signs up to have their information submitted manually. Faced with losing healthcare and prescription coverage, it’s easy to see why someone might willingly hand over all of their personally identifiable information.

Another variation related to the shutdown involves zero-interest temporary loans to “help” federal employees weather the weeks ahead without a paycheck. It sounds like the ideal solution to a terrifying problem, right? Just receive the loan and pay back the funds when work resumes and any back pay arrives? Unfortunately, this isn’t a government program or even one that’s backed by any financial institution. It’s entirely the product of a scammer’s imagination; providing your personal data and your bank account information—presumably for the loan to be directly deposited—only makes you their next victim.

Yet another confirmed instance involves phishing emails that appear to come from your bank. The subject line may actually be very comforting, something about skipping payments during the shutdown, but that’s only to get you to open the email. Like most phishing emails, you’re directed to click the link to sign up for the free payment forgiveness offer, but the link can install harmful software on your computer, redirect to a fake website that steals your information, or worse.

It’s sickening to think that anyone would be so cruel as to steal from federal employees or Medicare recipients at a time like this, and worse, would use a frightening scenario such as the shutdown to steal from the public. Sadly, scammers love nothing more than a widespread crisis to lure their victims into their net.

There are some steps that consumers can take to protect themselves. Fortunately, these are not only useful during this shutdown, but rather are good habits to develop to keep yourself safe at all times:

1. Do not confirm your identifying information for anyone who contacts you.

No matter what excuse they give, refuse then take down their information. Then, using only a verified contact method, contact their business or agency yourself and find out what is wrong with your account.

2. The government will not call you out of the blue, regardless of what agency they work for.

If you receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government, it’s probably a scam.

3. The same applies to financial institutions.

Legitimate offers from a bank will arrive via postal mail and will never expect you to provide personal information to a caller or via email.

4. The best offense is always a strong defense.

Become “suspicious by nature” when anyone contacts you and wants your information or account access.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


Read next: The Government Shutdown is Hurting Crime Victims

With more than 60 million reported cases of identity theft in the US to date, there is no single demographic that is immune from the threat. In fact, the opposite is true; some age groups or even residents in certain states are more likely than the rest of the population to face identity theft. Unfortunately, the more natural prey you appear to a criminal, the more of a target you become.

January is Braille Literacy Month in honor of Louis Braille’s birthday, so it’s a good time to understand how the threat of identity theft manifests among people with low-vision or vision loss, as well as share some ways to help reduce the risk of becoming a victim. Fortunately, many of the same steps are worthwhile for all consumers, not just a single risk group.

First, the Identity Theft Resource Center partnered with the Braille Institute on a highly informative session explicitly aimed at low-vision and vision-impaired people on how to reduce your risk and overcoming the aftermath of identity theft should it occur.

Also, Empish J Thomas of Vision Aware has shared a very insightful look at her own experiences with identity theft. The account includes key information about issues and obstacles that could make low-vision consumers more of a target for identity theft, as well as ways to overcome those problems. For example, junk mail and carrying extra credit cards could lead to theft without the owner’s knowledge, so Thomas recommends having a core group of trustworthy people who can intervene.

Unfortunately, common identity theft attempts can prove to be even more of a challenge for visually impaired people. Telemarketers and door-to-door salesmen, for example, can turn out not to be who you thought they were; there’s also the crime of opportunity in which the individual might not have set out to steal your data but seizes the chance after discovering your vision issues.

Here are some steps to protect any consumer, but especially those with visual impairments or low vision:

1. Do not take anything at surface value, whether it’s a phone call, letter, or email.

Those can easily be spoofed or falsified, so make it a good habit to never give out your personal data to someone who requests it.

2. Shred all junk mail, health insurance statements, medical and credit card bills, and more.

If you need to rely on a volunteer or trusted friend to help you decide what needs to be shredded, make sure your items are in a safe place until you can seek that help.

3. Install a robust security suite on your computer and mobile devices.

Remember, antivirus isn’t enough anymore, but there are some very affordable products that protect you from a broader range of threats.

4. Request a free copy of your credit report each year. 

And be sure to study it carefully for suspicious activity. Take action immediately if something is uncertain or out of place.

5. If you do suspect you’ve been the victim of identity theft, get help immediately.

The ITRC and the Federal Trade Commission both have avenues for assistance, and specialty organizations like AARP and the Better Business Bureau can also start you in the right direction.

Again, these things and other security steps are good habits for any consumer, so make it a practice to protect yourself at all times.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


Read next: The Government Shutdown is Hurting Crime Victims

SAN DIEGO – Jan 14, 2019 – The Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC), a national non-profit organization established to support victims of identity crime, is available to assist victims during the Federal Government shutdown. Heading into its fourth week of federal agency closures, consumers continue to experience long-term consequences due to the aftermath of the lack of availability of integral government services. The ITRC, a trusted non-profit partner of the Federal Trade Commission and the Internal Revenue Service, can provide those that need immediate assistance help through their toll-free call center (888-400-5530) if they suspect they have fallen prey to identity theft or a scam.

The FTC announced that filing reports of fraud, scam and identity theft is suspended at this time – with not just the filing unavailable but necessary forms and informational resources are also offline. Always available to help consumers but especially during the current shutdown crisis, the ITRC provides valuable plans for victims to begin the remediation of an identity theft or fraud case as well as the necessary steps to take during the government shutdown to be prepared to provide the necessary agencies documents when they reopen. Advisors can also provide alternative remediation plans, where available, based on case specifics and the jurisdiction of the victim.

“The core of our mission is helping victims of identity crime and we know that given the Federal Government shutdown, our free services are needed now more than ever,” said Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of Identity Theft Resource Center. “Victims can use any of the available channels of communication for assistance not only during this time of uncertainty, but year round.”

Knowledgeable ITRC advisors can assist victims with any questions they have about identity crime, as well as help them appropriately plan for reporting an identity theft case, filing a scam or fraud complaint, setting victims up for success as soon as the relevant agencies reopen (FTC, IRS, Social Security Administration). Assistance includes one-on-one live help, forms and other resources, along with a detailed remediation plan for each victim’s unique case.

“In my role as ITRC’s chairman of the board, I have been able to experience the collaborative relationship between the FTC and ITRC,” said Matt Cullina, chairman of the board of the ITRC and CEO of CyberScout. “Both of these organizations have a mutual mission to provide victims access to resolve their identity theft cases, but work together to support each other. During this challenging time for both victims and the federal agencies impacted, it’s good to know that the ITRC is available to provide support in the wake of the shutdown.”

The ITRC provides identity theft victims with United States identity credentials assistance free of charge. An advisor will work with a victim to provide best-in-class assistance in compiling the necessary resources and documents, as well as offer step-by-step instructions on how best to remediate a case. Consumers can also receive information and assistance by visiting the Identity Theft Resource Center’s website at https://www.idtheftcenter.org/ and utilizing the “Live Chat” feature. The site also contains the necessary forms and fact sheets regarding identity theft. The free app from the ITRC, ID Theft Help, is available to manage your cases progress, get pertinent resources, contact a call center advisor and access information on how to protect your identity – for those that prefer a self-directed mobile application.

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About the Identity Theft Resource Center

Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity theft in resolving their cases, and to broaden public education and awareness in the understanding of identity theft, data breaches, cybersecurity, scams/fraud, and privacy issues. Through public and private support, the ITRC provides no-cost victim assistance and consumer education through its call center, website, social media channels, live chat feature and ID Theft Help. For more information, visit: http://www.idtheftcenter.org

Contact: Charity Lacey, VP of Communications

CLacey@idtheftcenter.org

o: 858-634-6390

c: 619-368-4373

Ah, another year has passed and we’re ready to jump into the future of 2019. First, let’s take a look back at our predictions from 2018 that came true. We discussed the potential of AI to stop hacking, scammer’s new techniques to take advantage of social media users and transparency in IoT devices.  Of course with the emergence of technology and cybercriminals evolving their techniques, unanticipated challenges have arisen.

2019’s focus will be on data: Data breaches, data abuses, data privacy.  Even though ITRC is first and foremost a victim service and consumer education organization, we know that the thieves need our data in order to perpetrate their fraud and identity theft.

Data breaches: Consumers will gain more clarity (about how a specific breach actually effects them.  Breached entities will be pushed to be more transparent and less vague about the specifics of the type of data that has been breached.  Vague terms such as “and other data” or “client records”, that appear on data breach notification letter currently will no longer be tolerated by breach victims. Thieves are always looking to get their hands on our data and with a little technique called “credential cracking,” we think we’re going to be seeing more security notifications, not just breach notifications in 2019. Here’s what’s going on: following a large-scale data breach, and in order to gain access to your online accounts, a hacker simply uses a large database of usernames and allows the computer to “guess” the passwords for each account they are attempting to log into. We’re beginning to see companies send security notifications to their customers that their username/email credentials are being used – possibly by an unauthorized user – to login to their platform even if there is no account (i.e. Warby Parker & Dunkin Donuts).

Data Abuses: The public will gain more insights into data abuses, not just breaches.  More incidents, like the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica event will come to light.  As we as consumers demand more transparency, and as regulators probe deeper, the ongoing act of using our data for other than the purpose for which we have given consent will come out of the shadows.  Consumers will also start paying more attention to the notifications they receive from businesses that say their information was shared with third parties and what that means for them.

Data Privacy:  Consumer empowerment around privacy and data privacy is top of mind in a way that it has never been before.  Other states will follow California’s lead and pass their own data privacy legislation in the hopes of empowering consumers and keeping industry in check. Especially seeing as California, Florida, Texas, New York and Pennsylvania (in that order) had the highest numbers of cybercrime reports last year.  This will likely not provide the much needed long term solution, or the necessary cultural shift.  Just look at the condition of the state by state data breach notification laws, and the years-long discussion (that’s at a stalemate by the way) of a more universal regulation and process.  Will we start that cycle over again here?  Probably. Until the public has a concrete understanding of the complex relationship between data creators (consumers), data owners (the platform on which the data was created, generally) and data users (every industry currently operating in the US) these statewide measures will fall short of making any real headway into actually giving us more control over our data or more privacy.

Even though it has been discussed for over 13 years, there is a good chance that 2019 will be the year that a federal data breach notification law will become a reality.  Of course, predictions are just an educated guess based on previous events and information. Industry, policymakers and the public alike will have to wait and see how 2019 will be impacted by identity theft, cybercrime, hacking and data breaches. One thing we can be sure of though is that the ITRC will be here, working to fight back against the latest techniques to commit identity theft and scams.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


Read next: The 2018 Impact of Data Breaches and Cybercrime

For years, security experts and advocates have warned consumers about suspicious websites, specifically ones that take your sensitive information or payments. The best course of action? To look for the HTTPS designation in the web address at the top of the screen and the little padlock icon, both of which indicate a site can be trusted.

Unfortunately, scammers continue to evolve their ways to continue victimizing the public through technology. A new report has found that about 49% of known phishing websites—websites that steal your information after tricking you into submitting it—contain a secure designation and a little green padlock. The “look for the lock” advice that was once a sound way to protect yourself is a little less reliable than before.

Just as scammers have evolved, now it’s up to consumers to make some changes in order to protect themselves from the latest threats:

1. Install a security suite that offers anti-phishing and website security

A basic antivirus isn’t enough to keep you safe anymore, and a number of well-known security software developers have incorporated a lot of extra features. Some can alert you to a fake website or known scammer before you compromise your information. Even better, many security programs offer a wide range of subscription prices—even free plans—so there’s something to meet every budget.

2. Establish a throwaway email address

Some sites want nothing more than your email address so they can sell it to spammers. Generate a free email address that is separate from your everyday, commonly used one. Then, whenever you’re visiting websites that want your email address, you have the option to trust the site with your contact information or use your backup email address.

3. Designate a payment card for internet purchases

The last thing you need is for a phishing website to steal your money, but it happens. By intentionally having an “internet only” credit card that is not connected to your bank account and that has a very low credit limit, you may have an easier time protecting yourself from someone who steals your information.

The most important thing you can do is to remember that what was once considered top-notch security advice can change as new technology and new developments occur. It’s not enough to develop a good habit and never deviate from it. Instead, you need to stay informed by following ongoing coverage of the latest scams and frauds.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


Read next: “Secret Sisterhood” Online Gift Exchange Scam Alert

Identity theft is commonly associated with the damage it can do to victims’ finances, especially if the thief racked up tremendous debt. The countless new credit cards, the cars or houses, the new utilities turned on in apartments the victim didn’t rent can all lead to six-figure debt before they even know their identity was stolen.

There’s another serious threat to identity theft victims, one that may be just as harmful, and that’s the emotional toll this crime can take. This side effect can easily be overlooked at first by both the victim and their family members or friends. Worse, outsiders might even treat this side of identity theft as a non-issue, diminishing the feelings of loss, mistrust and even paranoia that victims can feel.

Each year, the Identity Theft Resource Center conducts an in-depth study of ID theft victims who’ve reached out to the organization during the year for help. The study is based on voluntary feedback to a comprehensive set of questions in order to get a better look at the trends and the lasting effects of this crime. The resulting ITRC Aftermath report is then made available to the public, including law enforcement, policymakers and other stakeholders, in order to provide accurate information from the victims’ standpoint.

Year after year, respondents to the ITRC Aftermath survey list some understandable emotional harm as a result of the crime. They’re often left feeling hopeless to resolve their cases and have a generally negative sentiment about their ability to recover. More than 85 percent have stated that they’ve felt worried, anger and frustration and another 83 percent are left feeling violated. Even worse, almost 70 percent of victims say they don’t think they can trust anyone and that they now fear for their safety. Almost as many victims reported that they feel powerless or helpless, while the majority of them are left feeling sad, depressed and betrayed.

Part of the hopelessness and paranoia may stem from all the ways that identity theft leaves its mark. More than 30 percent of the victims who responded said the crime caused them problems at work, either with their employers or with those they work with, while eight percent said it affected them at school with either the administration or other students. Some victims actually lost out on employment opportunities or even lost their jobs because someone had stolen their identity and used it in a way that came back on the victim. Some of the victims had their paychecks or their insurance benefits withheld due to the incidents, causing severe financial harm and the obvious distress that goes along with it. It’s easy to see how the financial turmoil can seem minor in comparison to the emotional upheaval. Money problems can be resolved, even if it takes time, but thinking that someone is using your good name to break the law is an endless kind of hurt. Knowing that your family members or coworkers think you’re a thief or an irresponsible consumer can break even the most solid bonds. It’s important that all consumers understand the aftermath of identity theft in order to be prepared, both financially and emotionally, should it happen to them or someone they care about.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Download now: The Aftermath®: The Non-Economic Impacts of Identity Theft

SAN DIEGO, January, 17, 2018 – Today, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) announced the latest version of its free mobile app was made available in the Google Play and Apple stores. The ID Theft Help app is funded by a grant from the Department of Justice Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) and offers assistance to both victims of identity theft and consumers who want to protect their identity.

ITRC ID Theft Help mobile app offers new features to help consumers protect themselves against identity theft.

“The public is aware of the risks of identity theft, but are left with few free resources to help them should they become a victim,” says Eva Velasquez, President / CEO of the ITRC. “The ITRC’s ID Theft Help app gives users access to this help, as well as a wealth of resources to protect themselves from identity theft, all in a convenient platform.”

New features include interactive quizzes to assist consumers in recognizing their level of risk of identity theft and push notifications. Notifications will inform consumers of risks to their personal information, such as scams and data breaches, as well as reminders for easy solutions to minimize.

The app continues to offer resources for users at no cost, including direct access to victim advisors to guide the consumer through assessing his/her risk of identity theft and personalized assistance to mitigate cases of identity theft. It also includes a case-log feature which provides identity theft victims with up-to-date contact information for financial institutions, government agencies and law enforcement and an exportable document of all actions taken to resolve any potential identity theft.

The ITRC’s ID Theft Help app can be downloaded, free of charge, from the Apple Store and Google Play. More information about the app and its development can be found by visiting theITRC’s website.

About the Identity Theft Resource Center

Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a nationally recognized nonprofit organization established to support victims of identity theft in resolving their cases, and to broaden public education and awareness in the understanding of identity theft, data breaches, cybersecurity, scams/fraud, and privacy issues. Through public and private support, the ITRC provides no-cost victim assistance and consumer education through its call center, website, social media channels, live chat feature and ID Theft Help app. For more information, visit: http://www.idtheftcenter.org

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High-resolution images available upon request

Media Contact: 

Identity Theft Resource Center
Kelly Dwyer
858-634-6385
Kelly@idtheftcenter.org