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SAN DIEGO – Jan 14, 2019 – The Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC), a national non-profit organization established to support victims of identity crime, is available to assist victims during the Federal Government shutdown. Heading into its fourth week of federal agency closures, consumers continue to experience long-term consequences due to the aftermath of the lack of availability of integral government services. The ITRC, a trusted non-profit partner of the Federal Trade Commission and the Internal Revenue Service, can provide those that need immediate assistance help through their toll-free call center (888-400-5530) if they suspect they have fallen prey to identity theft or a scam.

The FTC announced that filing reports of fraud, scam and identity theft is suspended at this time – with not just the filing unavailable but necessary forms and informational resources are also offline. Always available to help consumers but especially during the current shutdown crisis, the ITRC provides valuable plans for victims to begin the remediation of an identity theft or fraud case as well as the necessary steps to take during the government shutdown to be prepared to provide the necessary agencies documents when they reopen. Advisors can also provide alternative remediation plans, where available, based on case specifics and the jurisdiction of the victim.

“The core of our mission is helping victims of identity crime and we know that given the Federal Government shutdown, our free services are needed now more than ever,” said Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of Identity Theft Resource Center. “Victims can use any of the available channels of communication for assistance not only during this time of uncertainty, but year round.”

Knowledgeable ITRC advisors can assist victims with any questions they have about identity crime, as well as help them appropriately plan for reporting an identity theft case, filing a scam or fraud complaint, setting victims up for success as soon as the relevant agencies reopen (FTC, IRS, Social Security Administration). Assistance includes one-on-one live help, forms and other resources, along with a detailed remediation plan for each victim’s unique case.

“In my role as ITRC’s chairman of the board, I have been able to experience the collaborative relationship between the FTC and ITRC,” said Matt Cullina, chairman of the board of the ITRC and CEO of CyberScout. “Both of these organizations have a mutual mission to provide victims access to resolve their identity theft cases, but work together to support each other. During this challenging time for both victims and the federal agencies impacted, it’s good to know that the ITRC is available to provide support in the wake of the shutdown.”

The ITRC provides identity theft victims with United States identity credentials assistance free of charge. An advisor will work with a victim to provide best-in-class assistance in compiling the necessary resources and documents, as well as offer step-by-step instructions on how best to remediate a case. Consumers can also receive information and assistance by visiting the Identity Theft Resource Center’s website at https://www.idtheftcenter.org/ and utilizing the “Live Chat” feature. The site also contains the necessary forms and fact sheets regarding identity theft. The free app from the ITRC, ID Theft Help, is available to manage your cases progress, get pertinent resources, contact a call center advisor and access information on how to protect your identity – for those that prefer a self-directed mobile application.

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About the Identity Theft Resource Center

Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity theft in resolving their cases, and to broaden public education and awareness in the understanding of identity theft, data breaches, cybersecurity, scams/fraud, and privacy issues. Through public and private support, the ITRC provides no-cost victim assistance and consumer education through its call center, website, social media channels, live chat feature and ID Theft Help. For more information, visit: http://www.idtheftcenter.org

Contact: Charity Lacey, VP of Communications

CLacey@idtheftcenter.org

o: 858-634-6390

c: 619-368-4373

Identity theft is commonly associated with the damage it can do to victims’ finances, especially if the thief racked up tremendous debt. The countless new credit cards, the cars or houses, the new utilities turned on in apartments the victim didn’t rent can all lead to six-figure debt before they even know their identity was stolen.

There’s another serious threat to identity theft victims, one that may be just as harmful, and that’s the emotional toll this crime can take. This side effect can easily be overlooked at first by both the victim and their family members or friends. Worse, outsiders might even treat this side of identity theft as a non-issue, diminishing the feelings of loss, mistrust and even paranoia that victims can feel.

Each year, the Identity Theft Resource Center conducts an in-depth study of ID theft victims who’ve reached out to the organization during the year for help. The study is based on voluntary feedback to a comprehensive set of questions in order to get a better look at the trends and the lasting effects of this crime. The resulting ITRC Aftermath report is then made available to the public, including law enforcement, policymakers and other stakeholders, in order to provide accurate information from the victims’ standpoint.

Year after year, respondents to the ITRC Aftermath survey list some understandable emotional harm as a result of the crime. They’re often left feeling hopeless to resolve their cases and have a generally negative sentiment about their ability to recover. More than 85 percent have stated that they’ve felt worried, anger and frustration and another 83 percent are left feeling violated. Even worse, almost 70 percent of victims say they don’t think they can trust anyone and that they now fear for their safety. Almost as many victims reported that they feel powerless or helpless, while the majority of them are left feeling sad, depressed and betrayed.

Part of the hopelessness and paranoia may stem from all the ways that identity theft leaves its mark. More than 30 percent of the victims who responded said the crime caused them problems at work, either with their employers or with those they work with, while eight percent said it affected them at school with either the administration or other students. Some victims actually lost out on employment opportunities or even lost their jobs because someone had stolen their identity and used it in a way that came back on the victim. Some of the victims had their paychecks or their insurance benefits withheld due to the incidents, causing severe financial harm and the obvious distress that goes along with it. It’s easy to see how the financial turmoil can seem minor in comparison to the emotional upheaval. Money problems can be resolved, even if it takes time, but thinking that someone is using your good name to break the law is an endless kind of hurt. Knowing that your family members or coworkers think you’re a thief or an irresponsible consumer can break even the most solid bonds. It’s important that all consumers understand the aftermath of identity theft in order to be prepared, both financially and emotionally, should it happen to them or someone they care about.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Download now: The Aftermath®: The Non-Economic Impacts of Identity Theft

Against all odds, Caren’s aging out of the foster youth system and ready to strike out on her own. By all accounts, she’s done quite well — graduating from high school, attending college, and earning $30,000 a year working part-time as a store manager. She even bought a car and has three months’ rent saved to get an apartment.

The problem is, Caren’s birth mother stole her identity and ruined Caren’s credit history. As a result, no one will rent to her. Caren’s transitional housing is about to end, and she’ll soon have no place to live.

Why foster youth become victims of identity theft

Caren isn’t her real name, but she’s a real victim of child identity theft, something that’s all too common among foster youth. That’s because of all the people who have access to a foster child’s documentation and personal information — biological parents, any number of foster parents, foster agencies and program personnel.

In this case, Caren’s biological mother used her identity for cable television and other household bills. This apparently went on for years. When Caren discovered the problem, she could’ve filed a police report, but she worried what would happen to her mother. She also worried what would happen to her siblings who still live at home with her mother.

So, Caren faces homelessness instead.

“Foster youth have so much that’s out of their control,” said Eva Velasquez, CEO of Identity Theft Resource Center. “Not only is their information being shared and, unfortunately, often not in a secure way, they don’t have that parent or guardian behind them, trying to help.”

Symantec’s new program to help foster youth identity theft victims

With situations like Caren’s in mind, Symantec has launched a new program to help foster youth and the nonprofits that support them. It’s called FAST, Fostering a Secure Tomorrow. FAST will help foster youth protect and restore their identities, using the support of Norton and LifeLock experts, solutions, and services.

Symantec will partner with the Identity Theft Resource CenterTechSoup, and a network of community groups and organizations to assist foster youth. Initially, FAST will work with three foster youth-focused nonprofits. These are Bill Wilson Center and Promises2Kids in California, and Aid to Adoption of Special Kids in Arizona.

Symantec will provide cyber security education, access to security products, and identity restoration services. Symantec employee volunteers will mentor youth, provide program training, and advocate for strong policies that help protect foster children.

Caren isn’t alone. There are stories like hers across the foster youth system. And they illustrate the need for programs like FAST to not only restore the identities of foster youth victims, but also help protect these young people against becoming identity theft victims in the first place.

This blog was originally posted on Symantec.com. Symantec proudly provides financial support to the Identity Theft Resource Center.


If you think you may be a victim of identity theft, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App.