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  • Criminals claiming to be with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) are targeting people with emails as taxpayers continue to receive the third round of Economic Impact Payments (EIP) that began in March 2021.
  • Identity criminals send messages claiming you can receive an EIP Payment. They say the IRS is sending payments each week to qualified individuals as they continue to process tax returns.
  • However, messages like these are IRS scams seeking your personal and financial information to commit identity theft and fraud.
  • The IRS will never email, text, call or send a message on social media to anyone. If you receive a message claiming to be from the IRS, ignore it. You are also encouraged to forward it to the IRS at phishing@irs.gov and note that it seems to be a phishing scam seeking your personal information.
  • To learn more, or if you believe you have received IRS scams by email, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) toll-free by phone (888.400.5530) or live-chat at www.idtheftcenter.org to speak with an expert advisor.

The third round of Economic Impact Payments (EIP) from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) began to go out in March 2021. However, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) continues to receive messages about IRS scams by email, like the one below.

According to an official IRS notice, the Service is still sending EIP Payments weekly as 2020 tax returns are processed. Criminals have been striking with scams since the first stimulus package was passed in 2020. While many EIP Payments have been received, you should beware of scams asking for payment to receive compensation and remember that the IRS will never call, message or email anyone.

Who are the Targets?

U.S. Taxpayers

What is the Scam?

In the latest IRS scams by email, identity criminals send emails to inboxes claiming that they are eligible to receive a payment after the last annual calculation of their “fiscal activity.” The email goes on to say that each week the IRS will continue to send the third EIP Payments to eligible individuals as they process tax returns. The phishing emails also include a button to “claim my payment.”

What They Want

Scammers want you to either respond or click on a malicious link so they can steal your personal and financial information to commit different forms of identity crimes, including financial identity theft.

How to Avoid Being Scammed

  • Ignore emails, texts or social media messages claiming to be from the IRS. Do not respond to the messages or click on any links or attachments because they could be malicious. Acting on the IRS scams by email, text or social media could lead to having your information stolen. The IRS will not email or message anyone. Do not share any personal information, including credit card and bank account numbers, except on the official www.IRS.gov website or the representative you contacted by calling the IRS.
  • Ignore calls claiming to be from the IRS. While IRS scams by email continue to circulate, identity criminals could call you, too. If you receive an unsolicited call claiming to be from the IRS, ignore it. The IRS will not call anyone unsolicited, either.
  • Send phishing emails to the IRS. The IRS asks anyone who receives a phony email to forward it to phishing@irs.gov and note that it seems to be a phishing scam seeking your information.
  • Report the identity crime. You can report any identity fraud to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) by visiting www.IdentityTheft.gov.

If you have received IRS scams by email, text message, social media or by phone, you can also contact the ITRC toll-free by calling 888.400.5530 or using the live-chat function at www.idtheftcenter.org. ITRC expert advisors will help you create a resolution plan with the steps you need to take.

  • Advanced child tax credit payments are being sent by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) as part of the American Rescue Plan. However, scammers may try to take advantage of the funds with child tax credit scams.
  • The IRS will not call, text, email or message you about a child tax credit. If you receive an unsolicited message, it is a scam.
  • To avoid a child text credit scam, do not respond to any unsolicited messages or click on any unknown links or attachments. Also, report the fraudulent activity to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) by emailing reportfraud@ftc.gov and the IRS by calling 800.829.4933.
  • For more information on the child tax credit, who is eligible, how to submit your information and more, click here.
  • If you believe you are the victim of a child tax credit scam or another form of identity theft, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free by phone (888.400.5530) or live-chat on the company website www.idtheftcenter.org.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has sent approximately $15 billion to around 35 million families eligible for the advanced child tax credit. With the process underway, parents should look out for child tax credit scams. No eligible taxpayer has to do anything to receive the money, but criminals may try to say otherwise.

What You Need to Know About the Advanced Child Tax Credit

The advanced child tax credit was included in the American Rescue Plan, and it provides $250 to $300 per month per child to most families from July through December 2021. The IRS is paying half the total credit amount in advance monthly payments. The payments will come via direct deposit, paper check or debit card (more than 85 percent of the funds have been sent by direct deposit). Parents will claim the other half when they file their 2021 income tax return.

The IRS urges taxpayers who usually aren’t required to file federal income tax returns to file a return if they are eligible for Economic Impact Payments or advance payments of the Child Tax Credit. Learn more from the IRS about the advanced child tax credit, who is eligible, how to submit your information and much more.

Child Tax Credit Scams

Criminals are aware of the payments and will likely launch child tax credit scams. Criminals may impersonate IRS representatives just to steal your personally identifiable information (PII) like a Social Security number or bank account information. PII can be used to pose as you on the IRS website and reroute your money to the cybercriminals.  

The ITRC’s CEO Eva Velasquez recently told NerdWallet: “Do not rely on incoming communications. If you didn’t initiate the contact, don’t engage. Caller I.D. cannot be trusted; even if a government agency’s name is listed, thieves may have originated the call and spoofed the caller I.D. display.”

What Should You Do?

The IRS says parents do not have to take any action to receive the advanced child tax credit funds. If you want to opt-out of the IRS payments or change your information, you can do that at www.irs.gov. Here are other tips on how to avoid an advanced child tax credit scam:

  • Don’t respond to solicited communication. The IRS will not call, text, email or message you. If you receive a message claiming to be from the IRS, ignore it. The IRS will mail you anything that is legitimate, and there are ways you can make sure it is from the Service.
  • Don’t click on any unknown links. If you receive a message claiming to be from the IRS, it is important not to click on any links or attachments because they could be malicious and used to steal your personal information. They could also lead you to a fraudulent website that asks you to input sensitive PII.
  • Know who is supposed to receive the check. If you share custody of a child, make sure you know who is supposed to receive the check because sometimes a “missing” check has actually been delivered.
  • Report child tax credit scams and fraud. If someone tries to take advantage of you with a child tax credit scam, you can report it to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) by emailing reportfraud@ftc.gov. If you believe someone stole the check from your mailbox, contact the IRS (800.829.4933) because they can trace the check and replace the money.
  • Track your check. If it is mailed to you, go to www.USPS.com and sign up for Informed Delivery, which emails you photos of your mail before it is delivered. When your check is expected, pick up your mail or have someone do it for you as quickly as possible to avoid a repeat of earlier problems with government check deliveries.

Contact the ITRC

For more information on child tax credit payments, or if you believe you were the victim of a child tax credit scam, contact us. You can speak with an expert advisor at no cost by phone (888.400.5530) or live-chat on the company website. Just visit www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.