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  • The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) teams have seen an uptick in subscription renewal scams as a way of stealing your identity. Criminals send emails about auto-renewals for subscriptions in hopes you will click on a malicious link.
  • Identity criminals are after your personal information so they can use it to commit different forms of identity theft and identity fraud.
  • To avoid a subscription renewal scam, ignore any messages about auto-renewals claiming to be from a company where you don’t have a subscription. If it appears to be from a company where you do have a subscription, check the sender’s email address to ensure it’s from the correct company.
  • Don’t click on any links until you confirm the email is legitimate. If the email is a spoof, report it as spam, block the sender and delete the email.
  • To learn more, or if you believe you have received subscription renewal scams, contact the ITRC. Call toll-free by phone (888.400.5530) or live-chat at www.idtheftcenter.org to speak with an expert advisor.

Subscription renewal scams aren’t new. However, ITRC team members have seen a rise in the number of phishing emails claiming it’s time to renew an annual subscription. The phishing attempt pictured below is a subscription renewal scam one ITRC team member received, claiming to be from Geek Squad.

Scammers use emails like these to get you to click on a malicious link and steal your personal information so they can commit identity crimes with it. Many subscription renewal scams look legitimate. It is important you know how to spot one and the steps to stay safe so your sensitive information isn’t compromised.

Who are the Targets?

Text and email users

What is the Scam?

Criminals pose as a recognized company and send texts and emails to people informing them that their annual subscription has been renewed. The phishing emails go on to ask people to click on a link to review the summary details of their renewal. However, the link is malicious and either installs malware on your computer, steals your personal information or takes you to a fake website.

What They Want

Cybercriminals want you to respond to the subscription renewal scams or click on the malicious link in the message so they can steal your personal information. Identity criminals may proceed to use your information to commit an array of identity crimes.

How to Avoid Being Scammed

  • If you receive a text or email about a subscription renewal from a company you do not have a subscription with, ignore it. Don’t click on any links because they could contain malware. If you receive emails you are not expecting, go directly back to the source to see if the message is real.
  • Check the email sender’s address to make sure it is legitimate if you get an email from a company about a subscription renewal with which you have a subscription. If you are still unsure, reach out to the company directly to confirm the validity of the message.
  • If you know the email is a subscription renewal scam, report it as spam, block the sender and delete the email.

Contact the ITRC toll-free by calling 888.400.5530 or using the live-chat function at www.idtheftcenter.org if you’ve received any subscription renewal scams. ITRC expert advisors will help you create a resolution plan with the steps you need to take.