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In 2020, the number of individuals impacted by a data breach was down 66 percent from 2019; cybercriminals continue to shift away from mass attacks seeking consumer information and towards attacks aimed at businesses using stolen logins and passwords  

SAN DIEGO, January 28, 2021 – Today, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC), a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity crime, released its 15th annual Data Breach Report. According to the report, the number of U.S. data breaches tracked in 2020 (1,108) decreased 19 percent from the total number of breaches reported in 2019 (1,473). In 2020, 300,562,519 individuals were impacted by a data breach, a 66 percent decrease from 2019.  

The 2020 Data Breach Report shows the continuation of a trend from 2019: cybercriminals are less interested in stealing large amounts of consumers’ personal information. Instead, threat actors are more interested in taking advantage of bad consumer behaviors to attack businesses using stolen credentials like logins and passwords. Due to the shift in tactics, ransomware and phishing attacks directed at organizations are now the preferred data theft method by cyberthieves.  

Ransomware and phishing attacks require less effort, are largely automated, and generate much higher payouts than taking over individuals’ accounts. One ransomware attack can generate as much revenue in minutes as hundreds of individual identity theft attempts over months or years. According to Coveware, the average ransomware payout has grown from less than $10,000 per event in Q3 2018 to more than $233,000 per event in Q4 2020. 

Download the ITRC’s 2020 Data Breach Report 

“While it is encouraging to see the number of data breaches, as well as the number of people impacted by them decline, people should understand that this problem is not going away,” said Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center. “Cybercriminals are simply shifting their tactics to find a new way to attack businesses and consumers. It is vitally important that we adapt our practices, and shift resources, to stay one step ahead of the threat actors. Although resources continue to decline for victims of identity crimes, the ITRC will continue to help impacted individuals by providing guidance on the best ways to navigate the dangers of all types of identity crimes.” 

One notable case study highlighted in the ITRC’s 2020 Data Breach Report is the ransomware attack on Blackbaud, a technology services company used by non-profit, health and education organizations. A professional ransomware group stole information belonging to more than 475 Blackbaud customers before informing the company the information was being held hostage. The stolen information included personal information relating to more than 11 million people that was later reported to have been destroyed by the cybercriminals after Blackbaud paid a ransom.  

Another notable finding was that supply chain attacks are becoming increasingly popular with attackers since they can access the information of larger organizations or multiple organizations through a single, third-party vendor. Often, the organization is smaller, with fewer security measures than the companies they serve.  

To learn more about the latest data breaches, visit the ITRC’s interactive data breach tracking tool, notified. It is updated daily and free to consumers.  

For anyone that has been a victim of a data breach, the ITRC recommends downloading its free ID Theft Help app to manage the various aspects of an individual’s data breach case. 

Consumers and victims can receive free support and guidance from a knowledgeable live-advisor by calling 888.400.5530 or visiting idtheftcenter.org to live-chat. 

About the Identity Theft Resource Center  

Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a non-profit organization established to empower and guide consumers, victims, business and government to minimize risk and mitigate the impact of identity compromise and crime. Through public and private support, the ITRC provides no-cost victim assistance and consumer education through its website live-chat idtheftcenter.org, toll-free phone number 888.400.5530, and ID Theft Help app. The ITRC also equips consumers and businesses with information about recent data breaches through its data breach tracking tool, notified.   

Media Contact 

Identity Theft Resource Center 
Alex Achten 
Earned & Owned Media Specialist 
888.400.5530 Ext. 3611 
media@idtheftcenter.org  

  • According to a survey by Proofpoint, ransomware attacks are now viewed as the top cybersecurity threat by nearly half, 46 percent, of Chief Information Security Officers. 
  • Cybersecurity firm Emsisoft found that at least 2,354 U.S. government agencies, healthcare facilities and schools were the victims of ransomware attacks in 2020. 
  • The Emsisoft report also reports that more than 1,300 companies lost data, including intellectual property and other sensitive information in 2020. 
  • Ransomware attacks cause significant disruption when ambulances carrying emergency patients are redirected, cancer treatments are delayed, lab test results are inaccessible and 9-1-1 services are interrupted. 
  • For information about recent data breaches, consumers and businesses should visit the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC) new data breach tracking tool, notified
  • Keep an eye out for the ITRC’s 15th Annual Data Breach Report. The 2020 Data Breach Report will be released on January 28, 2021.  
  • For more information, or if someone believes they are the victim of identity theft, consumers can contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or via live-chat on the company website. 

Welcome to the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC) Weekly Breach Breakdown for January 22, 2021. Each week, we look at the most recent and interesting events and trends related to data security and privacy.  Human beings tend to end a year by looking forward, but begin the new year by looking back. This week, such is the case when researchers, having just finished publishing their 2021 predictions, turn to sharing their annual trend reports. How many of X and the increase or decrease in Y. 

Here, we are interested in the trends that impact consumers and businesses regarding data privacy and security. The first significant report on those topics concludes that ransomware attacks are now the single biggest cyber threat to companies based on what happened in 2020. If it’s a threat to businesses, it’s a threat to consumers. 

You may not know the name Phil Dusenberry, but you know his work. If you saw a Pepsi commercial during the ’80s, ‘90s and early 2000s, you saw his handy work. If you ever saw the “Morning in America” film for President Reagan or the baseball movie, “The Natural”, those belonged to Phil Dusenberry, too. Now, he has contributed to today’s episode when he said: “Writing advertisements is the second most profitable form of writing. The first, of course, is…” Hold that thought, and we’ll come back to it.  

Ransomware Attacks Considered A Top Cybersecurity Threat 

Cybersecurity firm Proofpoint has found that ransomware attacks are now viewed as the top cybersecurity threat by nearly half, 46 percent, of Chief Information Security Officers in a recent survey. Even more alarming is research from New Zealand-based cybersecurity firm Emsisoft that concludes at least 2,354 U.S. government agencies, healthcare facilities and schools were the victims of ransomware attacks in 2020. The impacted organizations include: 

  • 113 federal, state and municipal governments and agencies 
  • 560 healthcare facilities 
  • 1,681 schools, colleges and universities 

These kinds of attacks cause significant, and sometimes life-threatening, disruption when ambulances carrying emergency patients have to be redirected, cancer treatments are delayed, lab test results are inaccessible and 9-1-1 services are interrupted. 

The Impact of Ransomware Attacks on Private Businesses 

Ransomware attacks are not limited to the public sector. Private businesses are very much in the crosshairs of the professional cybercriminals who commit these crimes. According to the Emsisoft report, more than 1,300 companies, many based in the U.S., lost data, including intellectual property and other sensitive information in 2020. That’s just the number of companies with data published on websites where thieves post their ransom notes or stolen data for sale. It does not include the unknown number of companies that paid the ransom before anyone noticed.  

Few cyber-criminal groups released the data they stole in 2020. Only two are known to have done so after companies refused to pay a ransom. However, by the end of 2020, more companies were paying ransom figures over $200,000 on average to avoid the release of their compromised information.  

Many times, they paid the demands even if they didn’t have to do so. Emsisoft has documented cases where businesses with the necessary back-ups to restore their information still paid the ransom for fear their data would be released if they didn’t pay. Proving Phil Dusenberry’s theory, the most profitable form of writing…is a ransom note. 

ITRC to Release Annual Data Breach Report 

Next week, the ITRC will publish its annual report on data breaches. The report includes how many breaches occurred, who was impacted, why they occur and much more. There are some very interesting trends that we’ll discuss in our next episode.  

Contact the ITRC 

If you have questions about how to protect your information from data breaches and data exposures, visit idtheftcenter.org, where you will find helpful tips on this and many other topics.  

If you think you have already been the victim of an identity crime or a data breach and you need help figuring out what to do next, contact us. You can speak with an expert advisor on the phone (888.400.5530), chat live on the web or exchange emails during regular business hours (6 a.m. to 5 p.m. PST). Visit the company website to get started. 

If you want to work ahead and read our 2020 Data Breach Report, our 15th annual edition, it will be posted on our website on Thursday, January 28, as part of Data Privacy Day. Just visit idtheftcenter.org

  • The list for the most common passwords in 2020 is out, released by cybersecurity firm NordPass. The three most common passwords of 2020 are 12345, 123456789 and picture1.  
  • Weak passwords continue to be a security issue. According to Verizon, compromised passwords are responsible for 81 percent of hacking-related data breaches
  • To strengthen password security, consumers should change their password to a passphrase, never reuse a password (consider a password manager), use two-factor authentication when possible and never use work passwords at home (and vice versa). 
  • For information about recent data breaches, consumers and businesses should visit the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC) new data breach tracking tool, notifiedTM
  • For more information on how to upgrade your password, contact the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website.  

Subscribe to the Weekly Breach Breakdown Podcast  

Every week the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) looks at some of the top data compromises from the previous week and other relevant privacy and cybersecurity news in our  Weekly Breach Breakdown Podcast. This week, we will look at one of the behaviors that are increasingly at the foundation of many, if not most, data compromises in 2020: weak passwords

Why Passwords are Important 

As ITRC Chief Operating Officer James Lee mentions in the podcast, like the Porter outside Macbeth’s castle, passwords are designed to allow entry to our personal and work castles. Passwords protect the devices that are home to the applications and data we use and create.  

Passwords in the 1980s and 1990s 

People have been protecting passwords since the 1980s. The first passwords were simple, and most people only needed one. Maybe the password was assigned to someone at work, so they used the same one at home; that is if there was a computer at home. People were told never to write down their password.  

Then came the internet in the mid-1990s, and suddenly there was a need for more passwords. People needed a password for their AOL or Earthlink account. Eventually, people had to add passwords to the handful of other online accounts they created. However, most people probably just used the same word or set of numbers that was their device login password. 

Passwords Today 

Fast forward to today, according to cybersecurity firm NordPass, the average person now has to manage a staggering 100 passwords, up 25 percent from 2019. The rise is due, in part, to the increase in online transactions during 2020 related to COVID-19.  

Most Common Passwords 

NordPass also publishes an annual list of the most common passwords, which also corresponds with the passwords cracked most often by professional data thieves. Here are the top 10 most common passwords of 2020 and how long it takes a cybercriminal to crack the password: 

  1. 12345 (takes less than one second to break) 
  1. 123456789 (takes less than one second to break) 
  1. picture1 (takes up to three hours to crack) 
  1. password ( takes less than one second to break) 
  1. 12345678 (takes less than one second to break) 
  1. 111111 (takes less than one second to break) 
  1. 123123 (takes less than one second to break) 
  1. 12345 (takes less than one second to break) 
  1. 1234567890 (takes less than a second to break) 
  1. Senha (the Portuguese word for password; takes 10 seconds to break) 

The Dangers of Weak Passwords 

Weak passwords allow cybercriminals to access systems and accounts easily. People use weak passwords because there are so many to remember, which also prompts people to use the same weak passwords on multiple accounts and use them at work and home. 

Here are a few statistics from earlier in 2020: 

What You Can Do to Avoid Weak Passwords 

The good news is that people can do many things to make sure they have strong passwords that will keep their accounts secure. Here are some tips: 

  • Change your password to a passphrase. Use a passphrase like a movie quote, a song lyric, or a favorite book title that is easy to remember and at least 12 characters long. It would take a cybercriminal 300 years to crack a 12-character passphrase with upper and lower case letters. If you add a number, the passphrase will last 2,000 years.  
  • Never reuse your passwords, or passphrases since you just upgraded, right? If you have too many passwords to remember, use a password manager. If you want a free solution, many browsers offer a form of a built-in password manager. Safari and Firefox are two examples. 
  • Use two-factor authentication when it’s available. An authentication app like those offered by Microsoft and Google is best. However, even the two-factor authentication version that sends a code to you by text is better than no multi-factor authentication. 
  • Never use your work password at home, or vice versa. Stolen work credentials are one way cybercriminals use to get the access they need to launch ransomware attacks against companies.  

notifiedTM   

For information about recent data breaches, consumers and businesses should visit the ITRC’s new data breach tracking tool, notifiedTM. It is updated daily and free to consumers. Organizations that need comprehensive breach information for business planning or due diligence can access as many as 90 data points through one of the three paid notified subscriptions. Subscriptions help ensure the ITRC’s identity crime services stay free.  

Contact the ITRC  

If you have questions about how to upgrade your password to protect your information from data breaches and exposures, visit www.idtheftcenter.org, where you will find helpful tips on this and many other topics. If you think you have already been the victim of an identity crime or a data breach and you need help figuring out what to do next, contact us. You can speak with an expert advisor at no-cost by calling 888.400.5530 or chat live on the web. Just visit www.idtheftcenter.org to get started. 

Join us on our weekly data breach podcast to get the latest perspectives on the last week in breaches. Subscribe to get it delivered on your preferred podcast platform.  

  • Vertafore, a Denver based insurance tech company, discovered three files containing driver-related information were posted to an unsecured online storage service. The files included data from before February 2019 on nearly 28 million Texas drivers.
  • The files included lienholder information, drivers’ license numbers, names, dates of birth, addresses and vehicle registration histories.
  • Failing to secure a cloud database is tied with ransomware as the most common cause of data compromise, according to IBM. The ITRC’s own data breach information corroborates the findings.
  • Consumers impacted by the Vertafore data compromise need to follow the advice given by Vertafore and the Texas Department of Public Safety. Vertafore is offering one year of free credit monitoring and identity restoration services.
  • For more information on the Texas driver’s records exposed, contact the Identity Theft Resource Center toll-free at 888.400.5530 or live-chat on the company website.
  • For the latest on data breaches, visit the ITRC’s data breach tracking tool notifiedTM.

Subscribe to the Weekly Breach Breakdown Podcast

Every week the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) looks at some of the top data compromises from the previous week and other relevant privacy and cybersecurity news in our Weekly Breach Breakdown Podcast. This week, we will discuss the Vertafore data compromise that exposed personal information to the risk of being stolen by a cybercriminal by not installing security on a cloud storage service.

What We Know

There is one thing that almost everyone carries in their pocket – their driver’s license. Without a driver’s license, people can’t legally drive or show proof of age or identity. It is one of the most important forms of identification a person needs in the U.S. That is why a recent event that led to Texas driver’s records exposed has millions of people worried about how it could affect them.

Vertafore, a Denver based insurance tech company, discovered that three files containing driver-related information were moved to an unsecured online storage service. In other words, it was moved to a third-party cloud database with no security. The files included data before February 2019 on nearly 28 million Texas drivers. The files included lienholder information, drivers’ license numbers, names, dates of birth, addresses and vehicle registration histories.

In a statement announcing that Texas driver’s records were exposed, Vertafore says there is no evidence of information misuse. However, the company acknowledges that there is evidence an unknown and unauthorized party accessed the information. Other Vertafore data – including partner, vendor or additional supplier information – and systems remain unimpacted. No Vertafore systems were found to include known software vulnerabilities, and Vertafore immediately secured the suspect files.

Investigators hired by the company believe the unauthorized access to the data occurred between March 11 and August 1 of 2020. The files supported one of Vertafore’s products that helps insurance companies determine insurance policy costs. The files did not contain Social Security numbers or financial information about consumers. Vertafore is offering one year of free credit monitoring and identity restoration services.

Cloud Databases Continue to be Left Unsecured

Unfortunately, this kind of event is far too common. On last week’s podcast, we highlighted another company that left a cloud database unsecured, leading to nearly ten million people’s travel accounts being available online.

Failing to secure a cloud database is tied with ransomware as the most common cause of data compromise, according to IBM. The ITRC’s own data breach information corroborates the findings. Most of the time, there is no evidence data thieves removed or copied the data – meaning the risk of misuse is relatively low. However, it is not zero. It is why consumers impacted by the Vertafore data compromise need to follow the advice given by Vertafore and the Texas Department of Public Safety.

How the Data Ends Up in the Hands of a Private Company

The event that led to Texas driver’s records exposed has prompted consumers to ask questions about how their driver’s license and related data ends up in the hands of a private company. That is not an uncommon question when data breaches, compromises and exposures involve businesses that victims have never heard of – and did not give permission for their data to be shared.

While the answer to the question varies from state to state, the response is almost always some version of “it’s legal.” Also, consumers rarely have the opportunity to “opt-in” or “opt-out” of the sale or sharing of information like driver’s license data by the government.

In response to questions about the Vertafore compromise, the State of Texas issued a statement about the use of driver’s data:

“Texas law permits, and at times requires, the release to authorized parties of driver license and vehicle registration information.”

In the case of Vertafore, the permitted use involves ensuring companies have the data they need to appropriately price insurance premiums for drivers.

Even the nation’s toughest privacy law, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), allows personal information from government agencies to be sold and shared for certain purposes without the consumers’ consent. Generally, consumers cannot opt-out of these uses if they are designed to prevent fraud or are used to verify someone’s identity.

notifiedTM  

For information about recent data breaches, consumers and businesses should visit the ITRC’s new data breach tracking tool, notifiedTM. It is updated daily and free to consumers. Organizations that need comprehensive breach information for business planning or due diligence can access as many as 90 data points through one of the three paid notified subscriptions. Subscriptions help ensure the ITRC’s identity crime services stay free.  

Contact the ITRC

If you have questions about how to protect your information from data breaches and data exposures, or if you want to learn more about the Vertafore data compromise, contact the ITRC. You can speak with an advisor toll-free over the phone (888.400.5530), live-chat on the web, or email itrc@idtheftcenter.org during business hours. Just visit www.idtheftcenter.org to get started. Also, download the free ID Theft Help App to access resources, a case log and much more.  

Join us on our weekly data breach podcast to get the latest perspectives on the last week in breaches. Subscribe to get it delivered on your preferred podcast platform. 

  • Data breaches are down 30 percent in Q3 of 2020 compared to Q3 of 2019 when you look at the Blackbaud ransomware attack as a single event. 
  • Data breaches are down 10 percent in Q3 of 2020 compared to Q3 of 2019 when you look at the Blackbaud ransomware attack as a series of data breaches.  
  • Regardless of how the Blackbaud ransomware attack is viewed, the number of individuals impacted by a data breach is down nearly two-thirds.  
  • Anyone who believes they are a victim of a data breach is encouraged to contact the Identity Theft Resource Center to learn more about the next step to take. Victims can call toll-free at 888.400.5530 or live-chat with an expert-advisor on the company website. 

2020 has seen many different data breach trends. In the first half of 2020, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) reported a 33 percent decrease in data breaches and a 66 percent decrease in individuals impacted. The ITRC has compiled the Q3 2020 data breach statistics, and the number of compromises has dropped. However, there is one data breach that skews all the data. 

Two Ways to Look at the Numbers 

With the ongoing global pandemic and one particularly nasty ransomware attack against IT service provider, Blackbaud, reported in the third quarter, the Q3 numbers can be interpreted in two ways. 

Data Breaches Down 30 Percent Treating Blackbaud as a Single Event 

If we treat the Blackbaud attack as a single event, the number of data compromises reported so far in 2020 remains well below the 2019 trend line, with nearly a 30 percent decrease year-over-year. Looking at the rest of 2020, absent a significant data breach, 2020 could end with just over 1,000 data breaches. That would be the lowest number of breaches in five years, dating back to 2015. 

Data Breaches Down 10 Percent Treating Blackbaud as a Series of Breaches 

If the Blackbaud ransomware attack is treated as a series of data breaches, the year-over-year trend line changes significantly. However, the number of data breaches is still down in comparison to 2019. There have been 247 data breaches reported as a result of the Blackbaud ransomware attack. Once you add those to the overall number of data compromises, we go into Q4 with a 10 percent decrease in data breaches compared to this time last year.  

Individuals Impacted by Data Breaches Down Two-Thirds 

No matter how Blackbaud is categorized, one data point remains the same: the number of individuals who have been impacted in 2020 by an information breach. So far in 2020, roughly 292 million people have had their personal information compromised, nearly two-thirds fewer people than in 2019. The ITRC will have more information to share on our Q3 Data Breach Trends Report, which will be released later in October. We will also discuss the details on our sister podcast, The Fraudian Slip, in two weeks. 

Subscribe to the Weekly Breach Breakdown Podcast 

Every week, the ITRC looks at some of the top data compromises from the previous week, and other relevant cybersecurity news in our Weekly Breach Breakdown podcast. This week, we are looking at the Q3 data breach trends and the latest numbers.  

notifiedTM 

For more information about recent data breaches, or any of the data breaches discussed in Q3, consumers and businesses should visit the ITRC’s new data breach tracking tool, notified. It is updated daily and free to consumers. Organizations that need comprehensive breach information for business planning or due diligence can access as many as 90 data points through one of the three paid notified subscriptions. Subscriptions help ensure the ITRC’s identity crime services stay free. 

Contact the ITRC 

If you receive a breach notice due to the Blackbaud ransomware attack or any other data compromise and want to know what steps to take to protect yourself, contact one of the ITRC expert advisors by phone toll-free 888.400.5530, or by live-chat on the company website. Victims of a data breach can also download the free ID Theft Help App to access advisors, resources, a case log and much more. 

Join us on our weekly data breach podcast to get the latest perspectives on the last week in breaches. Subscribe to get it delivered on your preferred podcast platform. 


Read more of our latest news below

Shopify Data Exposure Affects Hundreds of Online Businesses

Dunkin Donuts Data Breach Settlement Highlights Busy Week of Data Compromise Updates

50,000+ Fake Login Pages for Top Brands from Credential Theft

There are different types of data breaches, but they all have frustrating, as well as potentially devastating impacts. On this week’s Weekly Breach Breakdown podcast, we are taking a look at the difference between a data breach that exposes consumer information and a data breach that reveals a company’s intellectual property or trade secrets; companies attacked by ransomware that do both is on the rise.

A Tale of Two Breaches

The current digital age can be viewed as the best of times and the worst of times, especially when it comes to data use, privacy and security. While many consumers enjoy unprecedented levels of convenience and prosperity, thanks to technology, there are also significant pitfalls. Despite billions of dollars in cybersecurity investments, personal and corporate information is exposed daily due to malicious and accidental events.

While many people view data breaches as personal information being stolen from companies about individuals, it is becoming more common for threat actors to target more than consumer data. Instead, many hackers are looking to get their hands on company secrets by landing a successful ransomware attack, leading to the company’s intellectual property being breached.

By August 15, more than 25 Fortune 500 companies were attacked by ransomware, where company intellectual property was at risk.

Nintendo

In July, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) posted about an attack on Nintendo, who refused to pay the data kidnappers’ ransom demands. As a result, the data thieves posted massive amounts of proprietary data on the internet, including game prototypes. At the time of the attack, it was believed to be a one-off. However, within days, two more global organizations found their company data being posted on the web for everyone to see after refusing to pay ransomware demands.

LG

Electronics and appliance manufacturer, LG, found source code for their mobile phones and laptops posted on a ransomware site. The ransomware group, Maze, released a statement that said they did not want to disrupt LG’s customers as part of the company’s data breach, so they opted to release the stolen intellectual property publicly rather than shut down LG’s systems.

Xerox

At Xerox, a digital document product company, information was released after the company refused to pay a ransom demand that involved customer service systems, but not customer information.

Carnival Cruise Lines & Jack Daniels

Just last week, household names like Carnival Cruise Lines and the makers of Jack Daniels Whiskey joined the list. In the case of Jack Daniels, the company claimed the attack was blocked. However, the attackers claim they were successful and threatened to release the data they stole.

Why the sudden increase in companies attacked by ransomware?

While there are multiple reasons why a company might fall prey to a ransomware attack, the new variable in the equation is people working from home as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. A survey released this week by the security firm Malwarebytes indicates that companies are seeing more attempted, and successful, attacks aimed at exploiting the weaker security that is usually associated with remote workers.

The research spotlights why there is an increase in companies attacked by ransomware:

  • 20 percent of respondents have faced a security breach as a result of a remote worker
  • 24 percent have spent unbudgeted money to resolve a security breach or malware attack
  • 28 percent admit to using personal devices for work more than their company devices, which could open the door to cyberattacks
  • 18 percent say cybersecurity is not just a priority for their employees

If employees are working from home or managing a team of remote workers, they should make sure they are following best practices for protecting their personal information and company data. Anyone needing more information about how to protect their work information should ask their company’s IT security team or contact the ITRC for tips on how to protect their personal information.

notifiedTM

For more information about the latest data breaches, consumers and businesses should visit the ITRC’s new data breach tracking tool, notified.  It is updated daily and free to consumers. Organizations that need comprehensive breach information for business planning or due diligence can access as many as 90 data points through one of the three paid notified subscriptions. Subscriptions help ensure the ITRC’s identity crime services stay free.

If someone believes they are the victim of an identity crime, or their identity has been compromised in a data breach, they can speak with an ITRC expert advisor on the website via livechat, or by calling toll-free at 888.400.5530. Finally, victims of a data breach can download the free ID Theft Help app to access advisors, resources, a case log and much more.

Join us on our weekly data breach podcast to get the latest perspectives on the last week in breaches. Subscribe to get it delivered on your preferred podcast platform.


Read more of our latest news below

Being Able to Identify a Phishing Attack is More Important Now Than Ever

Netflix Email Phishing Scam Could Steal Credit Card Information

Hacked Dating Apps are a Popular Target for Social Engineering Scams

Updated as of 10/9/2020- The recent social-good relationship management software data breach has nonprofit organizations left to figure out what to do next. Blackbaud, a cloud software company, used primarily by nonprofits, announced that they were the victim of a ransomware attack. Also, according to a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Blackbaud acknowledges that a ransomware attack in May that affected its clients could have exposed much more personally identifiable information (PII) – including banking details – than the company initially believed. The number of people affected is still unknown, and more information needs to be gathered to judge the attack’s actual scope.

However, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) has tracked 255 organizations and seven million people affected. People who engage with organizations that utilize Blackbaud could be at risk of scams and social engineering.  

What Happened

In May 2020, a ransomware attack was partially thwarted. However, the perpetrator copied a subset of data before being locked out. The hackers then offered to delete the data for an undisclosed amount of money. According to Blackbaud, they paid the ransom and received confirmation that the copy they removed had been destroyed. However, the confirmation was not detailed. Blackbaud says they have no reason to believe that any data went beyond the cybercriminal, was or will be misused.

The information exposed in the breach includes telephone numbers, email addresses, dates of birth, mailing addresses, donation dates, donation amounts and other donor profile information.

Right now, the following third-party vendors are reporting Social Security numbers being involved: The University of Detroit Mercy, Seeds of Peace, Crystal Stairs, Inc., Concord Academy, Bridgewater State University, Spectrum Health Lakeland, Vermont Student Assistance Corporation, Ball State University Foundation, William & Mary Business School Foundation, Salem State University, University of South Carolina Upstate Foundation, Shady Hill School, Berkshire Farm Center & Services for Youth, Inc., and Marywood University. 

There have also been notices of financial information and credit card information being exposed. Blackbaud is calling the incident a security incident.

How it Can Impact You

No one knows if there has been more PII stolen except for the hackers. Consumers impacted by the Blackbaud data breach could be at risk of scams (particularly giving and donation scams) and social engineering tactics. Multiple sectors were also impacted by the attack.

Healthcare Sector

Healthcare organizations all over the world use Blackbaud as their cloud software company. According to Blackbaud, 30 of the top 32 largest nonprofit hospitals are powered by their solutions. The ITRC has seen multiple data breach notices from healthcare organizations affected by the Blackbaud data breach. Since the breach impacted donors primarily, it could mean those individuals may be more susceptible to being targeted by fraudsters in the future. As of this writing, no personal health information (PHI) has been involved.

Education Sector

Blackbaud plays a significant role in the education sector. They offer school management software to K-12 schools, as well as universities. Some of the management software includes student information, learning management, enrollment management and school websites. Many schools and districts have acknowledged they were impacted by the Blackbaud data breach. Most of the information involved includes donor information, alumni information and student demographic information.

Nonprofit/NGO Sector

Blackbaud is a service that is primarily by nonprofits. Blackbaud offers an array of software services that cater to nonprofits worldwide, but are best known for their customer relationship management (CRM) tools. Many nonprofits use these to nurture their donors and fundraising. The range of types of nonprofits affected by the attack is vast. In fact, some Blackbaud nonprofits continue to come forward about whether or not they may have been impacted. Now, many nonprofits are trying to figure out their next steps for how to securely manage their CRM needs.  

What You Need to Do

The Blackbaud data breach and its impacts on businesses and consumers are specific to each affected entity and customer. Blackbaud has said that it notified its affected customers of the breach, and those customers should be notifying their impacted individuals. Depending on what information was exposed, the steps for those affected individuals could vary. Anyone who receives a notification letter regarding the Blackbaud data breach should not dismiss the letter and take the notice’s recommended steps.

The biggest threat, based on the data compromised, is social engineering. Employees of the nonprofit organizations impacted by the breach may receive emails that look like they are from an executive, in an attempt at spear phishing.

Donors and members of the nonprofit organizations impacted by the Blackbaud data breach may receive messages asking to provide their personally identifiable information (PII) to update their contact or financial information, either directly through the email or through a link that does not actually belong to the nonprofit they are affiliated with. If an employee comes across an email they find suspicious, they should go directly back to the person it claimed to come from and verify the validity of the message if it is internal. If it is someone claiming to be from outside the organization, it should be run by their manager, IT services, or someone familiar with the relationship.

Anyone who believes they were impacted by the Blackbaud data breach can call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530. They can also live-chat with an expert advisor. Another option if the free ID Theft Help app. The app has resources for victims, a case log, access to an advisor and much more.


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Another week has gone by, and there are new data compromises for the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) to educate businesses and consumers on. Since 2005, the ITRC has tracked publicly-notified U.S. data breaches and has tracked over 10,000 breaches since then; more recently, using 25 different information fields and 63 different identity attributes that are updated daily. On last week’s Weekly Breach Breakdown, we talked about the market price for consumer data in the dark corners of the internet where identities are bought and sold. This week, we are looking at the average cost of a data breach exposed to the public. We will also talk about the latest data breaches that reflect the trends in the new research. 

The 15th IBM Report on the average cost of a data breach was recently released, conducted by the Ponemon Institute. Reflecting some of the same trends the ITRC has reported, the IBM study shows that the global average cost of a data breach has dropped to $3.8 million – with the average being defined as a breach of 100,000 records or less. That is a drop of nearly a half-million dollars.

However, when you focus on the U.S. alone, the average cost of a data breach has gone up almost the same amount to an average of roughly $8.6 million. That continues the long-term trend of costs steadily increasing beyond the rate of inflation since 2005.

In regards to the calculation of the cost, costs include the following:

  • The actions required to detect and respond to a data breach
  • The costs of notifying the people whose information was stolen
  • Lost revenue and the costs of marketing and sales activities required to regain consumer trust lost as a result of the data breach
  • Legal fees, fines and settlement costs
  • Increased customer care support

Lost revenue is the single largest component at 40 percent of all breach-related costs. With all of that said, what is not included are the expenses associated with fixing the problem that caused the breach in the first place, and the changes needed to ensure it does not happen again. While it stands to reason that the bigger the breach, the bigger the costs, they are exceptionally bigger – 100 times bigger – if the number of records compromised is over one million records. If a data breach of 100,000 U.S. records costs $6.8 million, a one million record event could cost close to $900 million.

According to the IBM report, the number one cause for data breaches in 2020 at 19 percent is lost and stolen credentials – logins and passwords – which is also tied with misconfigured cloud environments. In other words, someone forgot to add the password to the cloud account, leaving information exposed on the web for anyone to see. Unpatched software accounts were in third place at a little over 15 percent, while malicious employees accounted for only seven percent of breaches reviewed by the Ponemon Institute. It is also worth noting that some security and human resource experts believe the number of attacks will only go up if pandemic-related layoffs increase.

Other key findings from the 2020 IBM Report regarding the average cost of a data breach include: 

  • 53 percent of the attacks in the 2020 report was financially motivated
  • The most expensive attacks occurred in the healthcare sector 
  • The average length of time between when a malicious attack starts and ends is 315 days – 10 and half months
  • Threat actors want consumer information – especially logins and passwords – more than any other data (80 percent of the time.) However, that is not the only data they want. Nearly a third of breaches in the IBM study were thefts of company intellectual property. 

Looking back at the top breaches this past week, Nintendo, the company that gave us Donkey Kong Mario Brothers, was the victim of a cyberattack where thieves dumped a large amount of data onto the web. While there was no personal information exposed, screenshots and prototypes of games were posted online. The Nintendo data breach reflects the IMB report’s findings that company intellectual property is also a target for cybercriminals. Intellectual property theft can have a significant impact on a company’s business performance.

A recent Garmin ransomware attack shut down customer access to multiple products and services, as well as manufacturing. It took Garmin, which makes GPS devices and fitness trackers, nearly a week to publicly acknowledge the attack, and services are still in the process of being restored. According to Garmin, no consumer information was compromised, and the ransomware involved is not known to steal data. Rather, the ransomware used in the Garmin ransomware attack is known just to hold data hostage.

Finally, there’s Drizly, the popular service for ordering adult beverages for delivery. The company was hacked, and information from an estimated 2.5 million accounts was placed into the dark web’s identity marketplaces. According to Drizly, no payment information or other sensitive customer data was breached. However, the cybercriminals say otherwise and are selling the stolen data for $14 per account. That makes all of the information worth at least $35 million.

For more information about the latest data breaches, people can subscribe to the ITRC’s data breach newsletter. Also, keep an eye out for the ITRC’s new data breach tracker NotifiedTM. It is updated daily and free to consumers. Businesses that need comprehensive breach information for business planning or due diligence can access as many as 90 data points through one of the ITRC’s three paid subscriptions. Subscriptions help ensure the ITRC’s free identity crime services stay free. Notified launches in August.

If someone believes they are the victim of identity theft or believes their information has been compromised in a data breach, they can call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 to speak with an expert advisor. They can also use live-chat. Finally, victims of a data breach can download the free ID Theft Help app to access advisors, resources, a case log and much more.

Join us on our weekly data breach podcastto get the latest perspectives on the last week in breaches. Subscribe to get it delivered on your preferred podcast platform.


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