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  • According to a new study by Coveware, cocaine trafficking in 1992 and ransomware in 2021 share similar profitability metrics; both activities carry +90 percent profit margins per unit. The major difference lies in the risk taken by the actors.
  • In 1992, every two kilos of cocaine trafficked resulted in one person arrested. Every four kilos of cocaine trafficked resulted in one person killed.
  • The survey sheds light on why cybercrimes are increasing and why ransomware cybercriminals launch direct attacks against businesses that indirectly impact individuals whose data becomes the hostage.
  • To learn about recent data compromises, consumers and businesses should visit the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC) data breach tracking tool, notified. 
  • If you believe you are the victim of an identity crime, data breach or want to learn more ways to protect yourself from cyberattacks, contact the ITRC. Call toll-free at 888.400.5530 or live-chat on the company website www.idtheftcenter.org.

Say Hello to My Little Friend

Welcome to the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC) Weekly Breach Breakdown for November 12, 2021. Our podcast is possible thanks to support from Experian. Each week, we look at the most recent events and trends related to data security and privacy. This week we explore a theoretical question: which would you rather be – a drug trafficker in 1992 or one of the ransomware operators in 2021. Don’t answer just yet because we are going to do the math.

Crime in the popular culture of the 1980s and early 1990s was fueled by the cocaine trade. Crockett & Tubbs were cops running around Miami in flashy clothes and flashier cars while Al Pacino’s Tony Montana uttered the memorable catchphrase that gives us the title of today’s episode – Say Hello to my little friend.

In Scarface, as in the real world, a life of crime seemed glamorous until the shooting started. Sure, there was lots of money, but there were also some pretty serious downside risks too.

Advantages & Disadvantages of Being Drug Dealers

Coveware, the cybersecurity company specializing in ransomware recovery, has done us all a favor and compared the relative advantages and disadvantages of being a drug dealer in the early 1990s – before the rise of cybercrime – or one of the ransomware operators today.

Let’s start with our friend Tony Montana, a purveyor of the refined coca leaf.

You’re the boss and you demand your team meet certain key performance indicators (KPIs) that you use to manage the business.

Your base unit of product is the kilogram of cocaine, and you generate $60,000 for each “key” sold. That key costs you $5,000 to produce and prepare for sale, including marketing and distribution costs. That leaves you with a cool $55,000 in net profit for a margin of 91 percent. Not too bad, considering you are dealing in a cash business with no taxes.

However, there are downside risks to your upside potential. There is a 50/50 chance you’re going to be arrested and sent to prison. There is a 25 percent chance you will be killed in a hail of gunfire or by ingesting your own product. The barrier to entry is also very high since you will likely have to kill someone or several someone’s to take the top spot in your illegal pharma empire.

Advantages & Disadvantages of Being Ransomware Operators

Now, let’s look at the current crime wave sweeping the world – ransomware. You and your hoodie-wearing clan have a base unit of measurement of an attack against a company. That company may hold the data of many different companies or individuals that you hold hostage unless a ransom is paid. A single attack generates an average of $140,000 in late 2021, according to Coveware. However, the raw material cost is only $2,500. Your net income before paying your pirate’s share to your crew is $137,500, or a positive margin of 98 percent.

Like our fictional drug dealer, there are downsides to being ransomware operators. However, unlike our cocaine peddling friend, you only face a one (1) in 8,000 chance of going to jail. Your one in four chance of dying from lead poisoning as a drug dealer goes to zero, and your barrier to entry is limited only by your technical skills and a conscience.

I ask again, which would you rather be – a rich drug pusher under constant threat of arrest and death, or one of the filthy rich ransomware operators who, with decent skills and a safe harbor outside the U.S., can have a long career free from any serious threat of jail or early demise.

Findings Illustrate Why Cybercrimes Are on the Rise

This discussion is not intended to make light of the very serious issue of ransomware. Instead, it is to explain why cybercrimes are increasing and why ransomware operators (cybercriminals) launch direct attacks against businesses that indirectly impact individuals whose data becomes the hostage. It’s easy to get in the business, you can make scads of money, and generally speaking, no one shoots at you.

Until we can find a way to disrupt this business model, Thomas Anderson – respectable citizen by day – the hacker Neo by night – will continue to be the role model for this generation of criminal kingpins.

Contact the ITRC

If you think you have been the victim of an identity crime or a data breach and you need help figuring out what to do next, you can speak with an expert advisor on the phone, chat live on the web or exchange emails during our normal business hours (Monday-Friday 6 a.m.-5 p.m. PST). Just visit www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.

Thanks again to Experian for supporting the ITRC and this podcast. Be sure to join us next week for our sister podcast, the Fraudian Slip, when we talk about protecting yourself from the latest retail fraud scams this holiday season with Julie Ferguson of the Retail Merchants Council and ITRC CEO Eva Velasquez. Be sure to join us next time for another episode of the Weekly Breach Breakdown.

  • When the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) was founded nearly 22 years ago, the root cause of most data breaches and data crimes involved paper. Now, it is far and away cyberattacks.
  • Phishing is the number one attack vector that leads to data breaches, ransomware second and malware third.
  • However, there are ways to protect yourself from cyberattacks. Back up your information, update your software, use strong and unique passphrases, and collect and maintain less information.
  • To learn about recent data breaches, consumers and businesses should visit the ITRC’s data breach tracking tool, notified. 
  • If you believe you are the victim of an identity crime, data breach or want to learn more ways to protect yourself from cyberattacks, contact the ITRC. Call toll-free at 888.400.5530 or live-chat on the company website www.idtheftcenter.org.

The Crimes, They Are Changing

Welcome to the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC’s)Weekly Breach Breakdown for October 15, 2021. Our podcast is possible thanks to support from Experian. Each week, we look at the most recent events and trends related to data security and privacy. We also use a lot of literary references – especially Shakespeare. Today, though, we turn to a different classic for inspiration – Bob Dylan – in honor of Cybersecurity Awareness Month. October is the time each year when you focus on ways to protect yourself from cyberattacks and other identity crimes. That’s why we’re calling today’s episode: The crimes, they are changing.

The Rise in Digital Data Theft

When the ITRC was founded nearly 22 years ago, the root cause of most data breaches and data crimes involved paper. Digital data theft didn’t arrive until the mid-2000s. Even then, it was usually because someone’s laptop or external hard drive was stolen.

Not so today. Physical attacks and human errors were once the leading cause of data compromises. Today it is far and away cyberattacks. In fact, cyberattacks are so common that the number of data breaches and exposures associated with them so far this year exceeds all forms of data compromises in 2020.

Phishing is the leading attack vector that leads to data breaches. The login and password credentials stolen in these email, text and website-related attacks are often used by cybercriminals to access company networks and databases held hostage in a ransomware assault – the second most common cause of data compromises.

Malware is the third leading cause of identity-related data breaches. It is often used to exploit software flaws or penetrate networks as part of a ransomware attack or just good old-fashioned data theft. Caught in the cross-hairs of all these cyberattacks are consumers – people whose data is held in trust by organizations that are the targets of cybercriminals.

The ITRC to Release Inaugural Business Aftermath Report

We often think of data breaches and ransomware only impacting big businesses whose names we recognize. However, later this month, the ITRC will issue a new report on the impact of identity crimes on small businesses and solopreneurs – the tens of millions of companies with zero or just a handful of employees. Without giving away too much right now, the research shows more than half of all small businesses have experienced one or more data breaches, security breaches or both.

Use Good Cyber-Hygiene Habits to Protect Yourself

What are some ways to protect yourself from cyberattacks both at work and at home?  The actions must be the same. Regular listeners already know the basics of a good cyber defense. Make good back-ups of your information, update or patch your software as fast as possible, and practice good password hygiene. Do not use the same password at work and at home. Each account gets a unique, 12+ character password.

There are two additional ways to protect yourself from cyberattacks you should consider:

  1. Collect and maintain less information. If you are a business, get rid of the personal data you no longer need once you complete a transaction. The same is true for consumers. Don’t keep sensitive information you no longer need. Cyberthieves can’t steal what you don’t have.
  2.  If you are a business leader, train your teams like you’re voting in Chicago – early and often. If you’re a consumer, you can use some routine training, too. Why is this important? Cybercriminals are constantly improving their attack methods and inventing new ones. We need to make sure we know what to do to stay safe from identity scams and cyber risks, and that takes training and education.

Contact the ITRC

If you think you have been the victim of an identity crime or a data breach and need help figuring out what to do next, you can speak with an expert advisor on the phone (888.400.5530), live on the web or exchange emails during our normal business hours. Just visit www.idtheftcenter.org.

Thanks again to Experian for supporting the ITRC and this podcast. Be sure to join us next week for our sister podcast, The Fraudian Slip, when we talk more about cyber education with Zarmeena Waseem of the National Cybersecurity Alliance and our very own ITRC CEO, Eva Velasquez. We will be back in two weeks with another episode of the Weekly Breach Breakdown.

  • According to IBM’s new report on data breach costs, breached businesses in 2020 paid ten percent more than companies in 2019.
  • In the U.S., the country with the highest number of cyberattack-related data breaches, the average data breach costs a company a little more than $9 million.
  • However, there’s also good news in the report. If an organization has deployed modern security tools and automation, the average breach costs drop by about 80 percent.
  • To learn about recent data breaches, consumers and businesses should visit the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC’s) data breach tracking tool, notified.
  • For more information, or if someone believes they are the victim of identity theft, consumers can contact the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 or via live-chat on the company website www.idtheftcenter.org.

The Cost of Living

Welcome to the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC)Weekly Breach Breakdown for August 6, 2021. Our podcast is possible thanks to support from Experian. Each week we look at the most recent events and trends related to data security and privacy. This week we talk about the ever-increasing data breach costs, direct costs to businesses that are breached and the indirect expenses to consumers who are the ultimate victim of the breaches.

Mark Twain once wrote the “the cost of living hasn’t effected its popularity.” The same can be said of data breaches. Despite the billions of dollars spent on improving cybersecurity, the number of cyberattacks that lead to data breaches continues at a high pace.

Breached businesses also continue to see the cost of recovery continue to rise, too. There is nothing in sight that leads experts to believe the costs associated with data breaches will level off or decrease anytime soon.

IBM Releases New Report on Data Breach Costs

The benchmark report of data breach costs is published by IBM Security based on research from the Ponemon Institute. The 2021 report, the 17th annual edition, is based on 537 breaches across 17 countries in 17 different industries – backed by nearly 3,500 interviews.

What’s the bottom line? There are several key findings:

  • Nearly 18 percent of 2020 breaches involved remote workers. Those companies paid $1 million more on average in total data breach costs than organizations where remote work was not a factor.
  • The biggest share of breach costs is attributed to lost business, including customer turnover, lost revenue and the increased costs of new customer acquisition thanks to reputation damage.
  • The average cost per record lost jumped to $161, up from $146 in the previous year. If the record involved Personally Identifiable Information (PII), the average cost was $180 per record.
  • The average number of days to find and fix data breaches grew by one week in 2020 to 287 days. Think of that this way: if a breach started on January 1, it would take until October 14 to stop it.
  • There is some good news in the IBM report. If an organization has deployed modern security tools and automation, the average breach costs drop by about 80 percent.

Average Data Breach Costs in the U.S. Over $9 Million

Remember the bottom line mentioned earlier? In the U.S., the country with the highest number of cyberattack-related data breaches, the average data breach costs a company a little more than $9 million.

These are average figures based on data breaches that range from 1,000 to 100,000 records lost. The costs go up by a factor of 100 when you get above one million records lost, which is not uncommon these days. Other factors that increase data breach costs include ransom payments and the complexity of a company’s IT infrastructure.

Not included in the report is how much of these increased data breach costs are passed along to consumers in the form of higher fees or prices. The report also does not quantify the impact on small businesses that don’t have the technical or financial resources that large enterprises do.

In October, the ITRC plans to publish a report on just that, how identity crimes impact small businesses, and how they recover. Stay tuned for more about our first Business Aftermath Report.

Also, listen next week to our sister podcast, The Fraudian Slip, when the ITRC CEO and the Founder of privacy protection company Abine discuss how consumers can protect themselves and their data while online.

Contact the ITRC

If you have questions about how to keep your personal information private and secure, visit www.idtheftcenter.org, where you will find helpful tips. 

If you think you have been the victim of an identity crime or a data breach and you need help figuring out what to do next, you can speak with an expert advisor on the phone (888.400.5530), chat live on the web or exchange emails during normal business hours (6 a.m.-5 p.m. PST). 

Thanks again to Experian for supporting the ITRC and this podcast. We will be back in two weeks with another episode of the Weekly Breach Breakdown

  • The Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC) 2020 Data Breach Report shows 62 percent of cyberattacks that led to data breaches in 2020 involved phishing and ransomware.  
  • Google and Stanford University study reveals that people with more than one device are more likely to be struck by a phishing attempt. It also says that Australia is the most targeted country for phishing attacks
  • Proofpoint Security study says people who had personal data exposed in a third-party breach were five times more likely to be targeted by phishing or malware. 
  • All three reports make the same point about the rise in phishing attacks – a data breach does not mean someone’s identity has been misused. It means people impacted are at increased risk of becoming an identity crime victim. 
  • For information about recent data breaches, consumers and businesses should visit the ITRC’s new data breach tracking tool, notified
  • For more information, or if someone believes they are the victim of identity theft, consumers can contact the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 or via live-chat on the company website www.idtheftcenter.org.  

Welcome to the Identity Theft Resource Center’s (ITRC) Weekly Breach Breakdown for February 12, 2021. Each week, we look at the most recent and interesting events and trends related to data security and privacy. This week we talk about what seems to be the average cybercriminals’ favorite pastime – phishing and the rise in phishing attacks. Phishing with a ph. In Troilus & Cressida, Shakespeare’s incredibly complex play about the Trojan War, the main character compares the great lengths some people go to deceive the search for the other kind of fishing that gives rise to our episode title: 

Whiles others fish with craft for great opinion, 

I with great truth catch mere simplicity 

ITRC 2020 Data Breach Report & the Rise in Phishing Attacks 

Two weeks ago, the ITRC released our annual data breach analysis, which pointed out that 62 percent of cyberattacks that led to data breaches in 2020 involved phishing and ransomware. Phishing was in the number one position because it is a simple attack to execute. 

Google and Stanford University Study Reveals New Phishing Attack Findings 

This week, Google and Stanford University released a new study that looked at the 1.2 billion phishing emails aimed at Gmail users during a five-month period in 2020. Among the findings: 

  • People are more at risk of a phishing attempt if they have more than one device. If someone only has a desktop or laptop, or only has a smartphone, they are less likely to be a target. The conclusion is if someone has multiple devices, they have more of an online presence. It is the same if someone sends a lot of emails – they are five times more likely to be phished if they do. 
  • Older users are targeted more frequently than younger people. Someone between the ages of 55-64-years-old is 1.6 times more likely to be the target of a phishing scheme than someone who is 18-24-years-old. One potential reason is that the older someone gets, the bigger their footprint, which makes them easier to find. 

People in Australia are More Likely to be Targeted by a Phishing Attack 

Who in the world do you think is the most targeted country? This will surprise you. While U.S. residents send more emails by volume than any other country, people in Australia are more likely to be targeted for a phishing attack than anyone else. In fact, the odds are nearly double that they will be phish bait down under.  

The U.S is number 16 when it comes to the likelihood of being targeted on a country adjusted basis. This is the point where we need to ask once again – why is there a rise in phishing attacks? 

Third-Party Breaches and Their Impact on the Rise in Phishing Attacks 

Proofpoint Security reported this week a 14 percent increase in malicious phishing emails in 2020 over the previous year. Here is the truly staggering statistic: People who had personal data exposed in a third-party breach were five times more likely to be targeted by phishing or malware, according to the report, which highlights just how damaging these types of data breaches can be, even in the long run. 

What the Reports Mean for Consumers  

The report comes on the heels of the announcement of the release in an identity marketplace of the largest set of logins and passwords ever compiled. Around 3.2 billion credentials were stolen in previous data breaches and bundled in a single file. All of these reports – from the ITRC, Google and Stanford University, and Proofpoint make the same point – a data breach does not mean someone’s identity has been misused. It means people those impacted are at increased risk of becoming an identity crime victim. 

To quote Proofpoint: 

“Our results suggest that data breaches expose users to lasting harms due to the lack of viable remediation options.” 

Contact the ITRC 

If anyone has questions about protecting their information from data breaches and data exposures before they happen, visit www.idtheftcenter.org, where there are helpful tips on phishing attacks and many other topics – including the 2020 Data Breach Report

If someone believes they have already been the victim of an identity crime or a data breach and needs help figuring out what to do next, contact us to speak with an expert advisor on the phone (888.400.5530), chat live on the web or exchange emails during our normal business hours (6 a.m.-5 p.m. PST). Just visit www.idtheftcenter.org to get started.  

Be sure to check out the most recent episode of our sister podcast – The Fraudian Slip – with a special guest from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). We will be back next week for another Weekly Breach Breakdown. 

  • A Canon data breach resulted from a ransomware attack on the company by the Maze ransomware group. Canon is just one of many companies recently hit with a ransomware attack, a trend the Identity Theft Resource Center predicts to continue in 2021.  
  • The mobile video game Animal Jam suffered a data breach affecting 46 million users after threat actors stole a database. However, WildWorks, the game’s owner, has been very transparent throughout the entire process, setting an example of how businesses should approach data breaches. 
  • Insurance tech company Vertafore discovered files containing driver-related information for 28 million Texas residents were posted to an unsecured online storage service.  
  • For more information about recent data breaches, consumers and businesses should visit the ITRC’s data breach tracking tool, notifiedTM.  
  • Keep an eye out for the ITRC’s 15th Annual Data Breach Report. The 2020 Data Breach Report will be released on January 27, 2021. 
  • If you believe you are a victim of identity theft from a data breach, contact the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 or through live-chat on the company website.  

Notable Data Compromises for November 2020 

Of all the data breaches the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) tracked in November, three stood out: Canon, WildWorks – Animal Jam, and Vertafore. All three data events are notable for different reasons. One highlights a trend and prediction made by the ITRC; another shows transparency by the company throughout the process; the third leaves 28 million individuals’ driver-related information exposed. 

Canon 

Camera manufacturer Canon recently suffered a data breach that was caused by a ransomware attack, but the company only acknowledged the attack was the result of ransomware in November. According to techradar.com and Bleeping Computer, the Canon IT department notified their staff in August that the company was suffering “widespread system issues affecting multiple applications, Teams, email and other systems.” On November 25, the company acknowledged the Canon data breach was due to a ransomware attack by the Maze ransomware group.  

It is unknown how many people are affected by the Canon data breach. However, files that contained information about current and former employees from 2005 to 2020, their beneficiaries, and dependents were exposed. Information in those files included Social Security numbers, driver’s license numbers or government-issued identification numbers, financial account numbers provided to Canon for direct deposit, electronic signatures and birth dates. 

Canon is just one of many companies that have been hit with a ransomware attack. As the ITRC mentioned in its 2021 predictions, cybercriminals are making more money defrauding businesses with ransomware attacks and phishing schemes that rely on poor consumer behaviors than traditional data breaches that rely on stealing personal information. As a result of the ransomware rise, data breaches are on pace to be down by 30 percent in 2020 and the number of individuals impacted down more than 60 percent year-over-year.  

WildWorks – Animal Jam 

Animal Jam, an educational game launched by WildWorks in 2010, suffered a data breach after threat actors stole a database. According to the WildWorks CEO, cybercriminals gained access to 46 million player records after compromising a company server. The information exposed in the Animal Jam data breach includes seven million email addresses, 32 million usernames, encrypted passwords, approximately 15 million birth dates, billing addresses and more. 

WildWorks has been very transparent throughout the entire process. The company provided a detailed breakdown of the information taken in the Animal Jam data breach, how the data event happened, where the information was circulated, whether people’s accounts are safe and the next steps to take. The ITRC believes WildWorks has set an example of how other businesses should share information with impacted consumers after a data breach.  

Anyone affected by the Animal Jam data breach should change their email and password for their account (consumers should switch to a 12-character passphrase because it is easier to remember and harder to guess). Users should also change the email and password of other accounts that share the same email and password. If any users think their account was used illegally, they are encouraged to contact the Animal Jam security team by emailing support@animaljam.com  

Vertafore 

Vertafore, a Denver based insurance tech company, recently discovered three files containing driver-related information were posted to an unsecured online storage service. The files included data from before February 2019 on nearly 28 million Texas drivers. Vertafore says the files have since been secured, but they believe the files were accessed without authorization. To learn more about this data breach, read the ITRC’s latest blog, and listen to our podcast on the event. 

Unfortunately, companies continue to leave databases unsecured, which is tied with ransomware as the most common cause of data compromises, according to IBM. Consumers impacted by the Vertafore data event need to follow the advice given by Vertafore and the Texas Department of Public Safety

notifiedTM  

For more information about recent data breaches, consumers and businesses should visit the ITRC’s data breach tracking tool, notifiedTM, free to consumers. Organizations that need comprehensive breach information for business planning or due diligence can access as many as 90 data points through one of the three paid notified subscriptions. Subscriptions help ensure the ITRC’s identity crime services stay free.  

Contact the ITRC 

If you believe you are the victim of an identity crime or your identity has been compromised in a data breach, you can speak with an ITRC expert advisor at no-cost by phone (888.400.5530) or live-chat. Just go to www.idtheftcer.org to get started. Also, victims of a data breach can download the free ID Theft Help app to access resources, a case log and much more.  

People are spending more time on their phones, tablets and computers now than ever, making the importance of cyber-hygiene tips as paramount as they’ve ever been. The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) wants to highlight some of the best practices and steps that users can take to improve their online security.

We recommend everyone make these cyber-hygiene tips part of their regular routine to greatly reduce their risk of identity theft or other cybersecurity compromises.

1. Use a secure connection and a VPN to connect to the internet

A virtual private network (VPN) is a digital tool that keeps outsiders, such as hackers, identity thieves, spammers and even advertisers from seeing online activity. Users should also be wary of public Wi-Fi. While public Wi-Fi may be convenient, it can have many privacy and security risks that could leave someone vulnerable to digital snoops. If connecting to public Wi-Fi, be sure to use a VPN.

2. Get educated about the terms of service and other policies

It is important to understand what the terms of service and other policies say because, once you check the box, you may have agreed to have your information stored and sold, automatic renewals, location-based monitoring and more.

3. Make sure anti-virus software is running on all devices

It is very important to have anti-virus software running on every device because it is designed to prevent, detect and remove software viruses and other malicious software. It will protect your devices from potential attacks.

4. Set up all online accounts (email, financial, shopping, etc.) with two-factor or multi-factor authentication

Two-factor authentication (2FA) or multi-factor authentication (MFA) adds an extra layer of protection to your accounts; it requires at least two separate verification steps to log into an account. Relying on a minimum of two methods of login credentials before accessing accounts will make it harder for a hacker to gain access.

5. Use secure payment methods when shopping online

One easy cyber-hygiene step is to only shop on trusted websites and use trusted payment methods. Consumers should not use payment portals or shop on websites with which they are not familiar.

Always use a payment instrument that has a dispute resolution process – like a credit card or PayPal – if you have to shop on an unfamiliar site.

6. Use unique passphrases for passwords and do not reuse passwords

The best practice these days is to use a nine to ten-character passphrase instead of an eight-character password. A passphrase is easier to remember and harder for hackers to crack.

Also, users should employ unique passphrases; if they use the same one, hackers can gain access to multiple accounts through tactics like credential stuffing.

7. Never open a link from an unknown source

Do not click on links or download attachments via email or text – unless you are expecting something from someone or a business you know. If it is spam, it could insert malware on your device.

Also, never enter personally identifiable information (PII) or payment information on websites and web forms that are not secure or have not been fully vetted. It could be a portal to steal personal information.

8. Make sure devices are password protected

If devices are not password protected, it is just that much easier for a hacker to share or steal personal information. Without a layer of protection or authentication to access the device, all the information saved on it becomes fair game. Use a PIN code, biometric or pattern recognition to lock your devices and set the same protection for apps that have access to sensitive information like banking or credit cards.

9. Log out of accounts when done

This is another bad habit that makes it much easier for someone to share or steal your information. Always log out of accounts when done so no one can get easy access to them.

While there is nothing that can be done to eliminate identity theft, account takeovers and other malicious intent, these cyber-hygiene tips will help keep consumers safe, as well as reduce the number of cybercrime victims.

For anyone who believes they have been a victim of identity theft or has questions about cyber-hygiene tips, they can call the ITRC toll-free at 888.400.5530 to speak with an expert advisor. They can also live-chat through the website or the free ID Theft Help app.


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