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When new technology comes along, it might take a matter of years or only a matter of days for a highly-skilled hacker to figure out a way to break in. With any luck, the person who breaks into the system is what’s known as a “white hat hacker,” or someone whose expert-level skills are put to use helping stop criminal activity instead of benefitting from it.

When security analyst Ryan Stevenson breached Comcast’s Xfinity website portal, it seemed like a frighteningly easy task. It simply required him to match up readily available IP addresses—basically, your computer’s code name onto the internet—with the in-home authentication feature that lets users pay their bills on the telecom provider’s website without having to go through the sign-in process. Another vulnerability allowed Stevenson to match users to their Social Security numbers by inputting part of their home mailing addresses—something that the first vulnerability exposed—and guessing the last four digits of their SSN.

Guessing the last four digits of someone’s SSN might not sound that easy, but it only takes seconds for a computer to do it with the right software. The flaw in the website allowed the computer to make an unlimited number of guesses for a corresponding mailing address, so it took very little time for the code to reveal complete Social Security numbers.

This vulnerability is believed to have affected around 26 million Comcast customers.

Comcast issued a patch a few hours after the report of the flaws. The company responded to requests from news outlets with an official statement to the effect that they have no reason to believe anyone other than Stevenson accessed this information. They also don’t believe that the vulnerabilities are related to anyone with malicious intent. Just to be safe, though, the company is continuing an investigation into how the flaws originated and how they might possibly have been used.

In the meantime, Xfinity customers would do well to monitor their accounts closely. This could potentially affect other accounts, not just their telecom service accounts, as Social Security numbers, names and mailing addresses were visible.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

When news breaks of a data breach, consumers might envision a network of Dark Web hackers infiltrating a major target and stealing their files. However, a large number of data breaches are the work of a company’s employees. Sometimes, those employees have set out to steal information from the business, while other inside job data breaches are purely accidental.

That appears to be the case in yet another data breach that can be traced back to an unsecured Amazon S3 web hosting server. Many breaches have already occurred as a result of user error in password protecting these hosted file storage databases, but this time, the compromised information was voter registration records.

A data breach involving voter records might automatically make the public assume the worst in today’s political climate, so it’s important to point out that the compromised information includes a lot of data that is already publicly available to researchers, journalists and other interested parties.

In this event, an unsecured server allowed anyone who “stumbled” on it online to see information that includes full names, phone numbers, complete mailing addresses, political affiliations, birth dates and genders, demographic information that has been gathered and more. The database included records for more than 26,000 voters, according to a report by Bob Diachenko, head of communications for cybersecurity firm Kromtech Alliance Corp.

Diachenko found the information online after conducting a sweep for unsecured S3 web servers. The information belonged to a political robocalling company named Robocent, who sells individual voter records to anyone who wants them for three-cents apiece. The only thing Diachenko had to do to find this exposed database was search for the keyword “voter” in his hunt for unsecured servers.

Unfortunately, another service had already found the information. According to a report on this incident by Cyberscoop, “By the time it was identified by Kromtech, the server had already been indexed by GrayhatWarfare, another website that scans the internet for open S3 buckets.”

When Diachenko reached out to Robocent to report the compromised data, the response was less than satisfactory: “We’re a small shop (I’m the only developer) so keeping track of everything can be tough.” The information is now secured, but there is no way of knowing who else has already seen it.

Looking back at the information that was exposed, it might seem like fairly harmless, common knowledge-type data. After all, names and addresses need more protection. However, this type of database exposure is a gold mine for identity thieves who commit synthetic identity fraud; that type of fraud occurs when the criminal pairs existing identifying information with a made up or unissued Social Security number, essentially creating a fake person who has the victim’s name, address, and other data points.

Since members of the public have very little recourse when it comes to knowing if someone compromises their information, it’s more important than ever to monitor your account statements and credit reports, secure all of your accounts with strong, unique passwords and stay on top of anything suspicious that happens with your identifying information.

ith harsh comments, pleas for help, and any other statement to get the money out of you. Don’t fall for it, and don’t let love turn into heartache and loss by giving in.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

The Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) and other advocacy groups have tracked data breaches, identity theft, scams and fraud for years. However, it is difficult to identify the geographic patterns to these crimes.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has released its annual cybercrimes report, which outlines which states saw the largest number of compromised records and the largest financial losses. The report provides statistics on what states are hit the hardest by these crimes. It also breaks down how much financial damage is caused and what mechanism for the crime was used. Interestingly, some of the states with the highest numbers of cybercrime have also been on the top identity theft state lists for several years. California, Florida, Texas, New York and Pennsylvania (in that order) had the highest numbers of cybercrime reports last year. The most financial damage from these attacks occurred in California, Texas, Florida, New York, and Arizona, again, in that order. As for how these cybercrimes manifested, Business Email Compromise (BEC) and ransomware were highly common forms, as were tech support fraud and extortion.

California, Florida, Texas, New York and Pennsylvania (in that order) had the highest numbers of cybercrime reports last year. The most financial damage from these attacks occurred in California, Texas, Florida, New York, and Arizona, again, in that order. As for how these cybercrimes manifested, Business Email Compromise (BEC) and ransomware were highly common forms, as were tech support fraud and extortion.

With such alarming numbers of occurrences around the country, what are individual consumers and businesses supposed to do? The very first answer is to simply understand that the threat even exists. Read up on the findings of the FBI, the ITRC’s annual Aftermath report, the Federal Trade Commission’s data on fraud reports. Once you understand the ways—and the likelihood—that cybercrime can strike, you’ll be better prepared to take as much preventive action as you can.

That action all starts with recognizing a possible cyber attack and refusing to play along. BECs and ransomware are easily ignored if you understand the dynamics that hackers use to trap you, for example. These tactics rely on the person receiving the communication not realizing the danger, so it’s important to set solid policies in place (for yourself and your workplace) about how to recognize, respond, and even recover from a cyber attack.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.