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For years, security experts and advocates have warned consumers about suspicious websites, specifically ones that take your sensitive information or payments. The best course of action? To look for the HTTPS designation in the web address at the top of the screen and the little padlock icon, both of which indicate a site can be trusted.

Unfortunately, scammers continue to evolve their ways to continue victimizing the public through technology. A new report has found that about 49% of known phishing websites—websites that steal your information after tricking you into submitting it—contain a secure designation and a little green padlock. The “look for the lock” advice that was once a sound way to protect yourself is a little less reliable than before.

Just as scammers have evolved, now it’s up to consumers to make some changes in order to protect themselves from the latest threats:

1. Install a security suite that offers anti-phishing and website security

A basic antivirus isn’t enough to keep you safe anymore, and a number of well-known security software developers have incorporated a lot of extra features. Some can alert you to a fake website or known scammer before you compromise your information. Even better, many security programs offer a wide range of subscription prices—even free plans—so there’s something to meet every budget.

2. Establish a throwaway email address

Some sites want nothing more than your email address so they can sell it to spammers. Generate a free email address that is separate from your everyday, commonly used one. Then, whenever you’re visiting websites that want your email address, you have the option to trust the site with your contact information or use your backup email address.

3. Designate a payment card for internet purchases

The last thing you need is for a phishing website to steal your money, but it happens. By intentionally having an “internet only” credit card that is not connected to your bank account and that has a very low credit limit, you may have an easier time protecting yourself from someone who steals your information.

The most important thing you can do is to remember that what was once considered top-notch security advice can change as new technology and new developments occur. It’s not enough to develop a good habit and never deviate from it. Instead, you need to stay informed by following ongoing coverage of the latest scams and frauds.

Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.


Read next: “Secret Sisterhood” Online Gift Exchange Scam Alert

In the past few years, retailers have seen a trend in how their customers shopped for the holidays. More and more people have grown weary of standing in the cold or elbowing through thousands of shoppers to buy this year’s hot toy. Savvy shoppers have increasingly opted to stay home in their pajamas and find great deals online.

That’s led to the rise in Cyber Monday. Once the holiday chaos of Black Friday is out of the way, the following Monday is a time to pop over to the internet and see what sales are taking place to finish (or start!) your shopping.

Unfortunately, just like Black Friday, Cyber Monday is a favorite holiday for identity thieves, scammers and hackers. In order to reduce your risk of falling victim to the crime, you have to take some steps to secure your identity.

1. Know your antivirus software – Antivirus software has come a long way since the early days of trying to block malicious computer threats. Unfortunately, so have the tools that cybercriminals use to steal your money, your identity, your computer and more. A comprehensive security suite can now offer you protection from ransomware, trojans, worms, phishing scams, keyloggers and so much more. Many of them now include parental control tools, which is great if you have kids, as well as VPNs and tracking blockers for private browsing online.

Make sure your security suite is installed, updated and ready to protect you before you start entering your credit card details and your shipping address online.

2. Know your payment methods – Whether you’re using credit cards, debit cards, online payment platforms like PayPal, or gift cards, it’s important to keep up with which method you used on which website. That way, if there’s suspicious activity on your card or account later, you can trace it back to which site you may have used.

It’s also a good idea to know ahead of time what kinds of consumer protection are in place in case of fraud. Will your credit card company stand up for you if someone steals your information or racks up extra charges? Will they protect you if the website you used was a scam and they never send your purchases? Find out the rules and regulations—as well as what kinds of money-saving deals and discounts, if any—are in place before you use it.

3. Know what you’re clicking – Fake websites, copycat websites that look like real retailers’ sites, and bogus ads that only lead to click-revenue are the bane of every shopper’s existence at this time of year. Look for the site’s HTTPS designation before you enter any payment details, and make sure this is a reputable company before you pay for anything. A quick Google search for the name of the company or a check of the BBB’s scam tracker can tell you if there are any dissatisfied customers out there.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Read next: “I’ve Hacked Your Password” Scam

When news breaks of a data breach, consumers might envision a network of Dark Web hackers infiltrating a major target and stealing their files. However, a large number of data breaches are the work of a company’s employees. Sometimes, those employees have set out to steal information from the business, while other inside job data breaches are purely accidental.

That appears to be the case in yet another data breach that can be traced back to an unsecured Amazon S3 web hosting server. Many breaches have already occurred as a result of user error in password protecting these hosted file storage databases, but this time, the compromised information was voter registration records.

A data breach involving voter records might automatically make the public assume the worst in today’s political climate, so it’s important to point out that the compromised information includes a lot of data that is already publicly available to researchers, journalists and other interested parties.

In this event, an unsecured server allowed anyone who “stumbled” on it online to see information that includes full names, phone numbers, complete mailing addresses, political affiliations, birth dates and genders, demographic information that has been gathered and more. The database included records for more than 26,000 voters, according to a report by Bob Diachenko, head of communications for cybersecurity firm Kromtech Alliance Corp.

Diachenko found the information online after conducting a sweep for unsecured S3 web servers. The information belonged to a political robocalling company named Robocent, who sells individual voter records to anyone who wants them for three-cents apiece. The only thing Diachenko had to do to find this exposed database was search for the keyword “voter” in his hunt for unsecured servers.

Unfortunately, another service had already found the information. According to a report on this incident by Cyberscoop, “By the time it was identified by Kromtech, the server had already been indexed by GrayhatWarfare, another website that scans the internet for open S3 buckets.”

When Diachenko reached out to Robocent to report the compromised data, the response was less than satisfactory: “We’re a small shop (I’m the only developer) so keeping track of everything can be tough.” The information is now secured, but there is no way of knowing who else has already seen it.

Looking back at the information that was exposed, it might seem like fairly harmless, common knowledge-type data. After all, names and addresses need more protection. However, this type of database exposure is a gold mine for identity thieves who commit synthetic identity fraud; that type of fraud occurs when the criminal pairs existing identifying information with a made up or unissued Social Security number, essentially creating a fake person who has the victim’s name, address, and other data points.

Since members of the public have very little recourse when it comes to knowing if someone compromises their information, it’s more important than ever to monitor your account statements and credit reports, secure all of your accounts with strong, unique passwords and stay on top of anything suspicious that happens with your identifying information.

ith harsh comments, pleas for help, and any other statement to get the money out of you. Don’t fall for it, and don’t let love turn into heartache and loss by giving in.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

Ah, summer! What’s better than longer days, warmer temps and maybe a quick out-of-town getaway to enjoy the season? Why, a budding romance, of course!

Unfortunately, for too many victims, that newfound romantic interest might be something other than he or she seems. Romance scams are some of the cruelest, costliest forms of fraud. Preying on people’s loneliness and hope, the perpetrators have no qualms about not just stealing your money, but also leaving you broken-hearted, embarrassed and ashamed.

With the summer months in full swing, there’s no time like the present to identify the telltale signs of a possible scam and develop some strong self-protection skills:

1. The Out-of-Towner Love Interest – It seems like many romance scammers have one unifying feature: they work out of town or in career fields that keep them isolated. It might be on an offshore oil rig, a deep-sea fisherman, a deployed active duty service member, or any other plausible excuse to not be available to talk or message all the time. If you meet someone online with one of these specific or similar job areas, proceed with caution because that’s a huge red flag

2. The Struggling Widow – Many online scammers rely on the sob story to get money out of their victims. A typical scenario is a single parent with a wonderful child, as this allows them the chance to very quickly ask their victim for money. “My son’s computer broke and I’m away at sea, he’s going to fail the school year and lose his scholarship if he doesn’t turn in this paper…” Who would refuse to help a dedicated student while his parent is out of town? Again, romance scammers often rely on the widow/widower story to snare their marks

3. The Overly Zealous Significant Other – “I’ve never felt this way before… I hope I don’t scare you off, but I think I want to spend the rest of my life with you.” Romance scammers often take a long time to groom their victims, keeping the charade going for months before starting to cheat them. During that time, scammers may even work in shifts to ply their victims with sweet talk, text messages filled with hearts and flowers and more. By escalating the relationship quickly, the victim already feels invested in it. Refusing to give money to a desperate person after they’ve professed their love and started talking about marriage? Inconceivable

4. And Finally, Show Me the Money – When a romance scammer finally does come around to asking for money, there’s ALWAYS a reason. “I hate to ask you this, please feel free to say no…” but my mother’s utilities are about to be shut off due to an error at the bank and I’m away at sea, or our son’s tuition check didn’t clear and they’re going to kick him out of school right here at exam time if it’s not paid. Other, more sophisticated tactics even involve the scammer sending the victim a check or granting them access to their bank accounts, only to end up costing the victim money when they go back on their promise. Many victims have also reported being told to send the money via untraceable methods like Western Union despite supposedly knowing this person.

Here’s the real clincher about romance scams: far too many victims keep it going rather than admit—to others or themselves—that this was all a giant lie. There have even been reports of victims becoming part of the scam, helping to launder money or bilk others for funds. Do NOT hesitate to cut off any relationship that starts to smell like a fraud.

If you are ever asked for money from someone online, stop and think: why would this person need me to help? Where are the other people this individual could turn to? Then, try this: refuse. Be firm about not paying, no matter what excuse the other party gives, and see if it leads to the end of the relationship. Any legitimate love interest would immediately backtrack and apologize, but a scammer will double down with harsh comments, pleas for help, and any other statement to get the money out of you. Don’t fall for it, and don’t let love turn into heartache and loss by giving in.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.