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In 2020, the number of individuals impacted by a data breach was down 66 percent from 2019; cybercriminals continue to shift away from mass attacks seeking consumer information and towards attacks aimed at businesses using stolen logins and passwords  

SAN DIEGO, January 28, 2021 – Today, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC), a nationally recognized non-profit organization established to support victims of identity crime, released its 15th annual Data Breach Report. According to the report, the number of U.S. data breaches tracked in 2020 (1,108) decreased 19 percent from the total number of breaches reported in 2019 (1,473). In 2020, 300,562,519 individuals were impacted by a data breach, a 66 percent decrease from 2019.  

The 2020 Data Breach Report shows the continuation of a trend from 2019: cybercriminals are less interested in stealing large amounts of consumers’ personal information. Instead, threat actors are more interested in taking advantage of bad consumer behaviors to attack businesses using stolen credentials like logins and passwords. Due to the shift in tactics, ransomware and phishing attacks directed at organizations are now the preferred data theft method by cyberthieves.  

Ransomware and phishing attacks require less effort, are largely automated, and generate much higher payouts than taking over individuals’ accounts. One ransomware attack can generate as much revenue in minutes as hundreds of individual identity theft attempts over months or years. According to Coveware, the average ransomware payout has grown from less than $10,000 per event in Q3 2018 to more than $233,000 per event in Q4 2020. 

Download the ITRC’s 2020 Data Breach Report 

“While it is encouraging to see the number of data breaches, as well as the number of people impacted by them decline, people should understand that this problem is not going away,” said Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center. “Cybercriminals are simply shifting their tactics to find a new way to attack businesses and consumers. It is vitally important that we adapt our practices, and shift resources, to stay one step ahead of the threat actors. Although resources continue to decline for victims of identity crimes, the ITRC will continue to help impacted individuals by providing guidance on the best ways to navigate the dangers of all types of identity crimes.” 

One notable case study highlighted in the ITRC’s 2020 Data Breach Report is the ransomware attack on Blackbaud, a technology services company used by non-profit, health and education organizations. A professional ransomware group stole information belonging to more than 475 Blackbaud customers before informing the company the information was being held hostage. The stolen information included personal information relating to more than 11 million people that was later reported to have been destroyed by the cybercriminals after Blackbaud paid a ransom.  

Another notable finding was that supply chain attacks are becoming increasingly popular with attackers since they can access the information of larger organizations or multiple organizations through a single, third-party vendor. Often, the organization is smaller, with fewer security measures than the companies they serve.  

To learn more about the latest data breaches, visit the ITRC’s interactive data breach tracking tool, notified. It is updated daily and free to consumers.  

For anyone that has been a victim of a data breach, the ITRC recommends downloading its free ID Theft Help app to manage the various aspects of an individual’s data breach case. 

Consumers and victims can receive free support and guidance from a knowledgeable live-advisor by calling 888.400.5530 or visiting idtheftcenter.org to live-chat. 

About the Identity Theft Resource Center  

Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center® (ITRC) is a non-profit organization established to empower and guide consumers, victims, business and government to minimize risk and mitigate the impact of identity compromise and crime. Through public and private support, the ITRC provides no-cost victim assistance and consumer education through its website live-chat idtheftcenter.org, toll-free phone number 888.400.5530, and ID Theft Help app. The ITRC also equips consumers and businesses with information about recent data breaches through its data breach tracking tool, notified.   

Media Contact 

Identity Theft Resource Center 
Alex Achten 
Earned & Owned Media Specialist 
888.400.5530 Ext. 3611 
media@idtheftcenter.org  

  • Approximately 56 percent of California voters passed The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA). The law will be the toughest privacy law in the U.S. once it goes into effect in 2023.
  • California residents will have more control over what happens to their personal information when businesses collect it. Consumers from the state can also have information corrected they think is inaccurate.
  • California businesses will be required to update agreements with contractors and sub-contractors that binds them to meet the provisions of the CPRA.
  • For more information on the privacy law, contact the ITRC at no-cost by calling 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website.

California voters went to the polls to decide the fate of the strongest privacy law in the United States. After counting the ballots, Proposition 24 – The California Privacy Rights Act (CPRA) – passed and will go into effect in 2023.

Subscribe to the Weekly Breach Breakdown Podcast

Every week the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) looks at some of the top data compromises from the previous week and other relevant privacy and cybersecurity news in our Weekly Breach Breakdown Podcast. This week, we look at CPRA and what it means for businesses and consumers.

How The California Privacy Rights Act Passed

Approximately 56 percent of California voters approved the privacy law. However, Big Tech and Big Privacy joined forces to oppose the proposal. The initiative was proposed to strengthen the existing state privacy law, The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), in many different ways.

What Consumers Need to Know About The California Privacy Rights Act

There are a few different things for California residents to know about the CPRA:

  1. Since voters approved the CPRA and not the state legislature, it will be more difficult to amend the law in the future. The legislature must submit any proposed changes to the popularly approved law to the voters in a future election. That makes it very difficult to weaken the privacy provisions in the CPRA.
  2. The CPRA gives California residents even more control over what happens to their personal information when a business collects it. The CCPA gives residents the right to access the information companies collect about them and request it be deleted in certain circumstances. It also prohibits the sale of their information for marketing purposes. The CPRA will give consumers rights linked to sharing information – not just selling data to third parties – clarifying one of the most confusing parts of the current privacy law, the CCPA.
  3. The CPRA adds a right to correct any information that a consumer thinks is inaccurate. Californians will now have the right to opt-out of automated decision processes that use their personal information. Also, they will have the right to see how automated decision processes work.
  4. The CPRA creates a new category of personal information that California residents can access and control in certain circumstances, like sharing information with third parties. The new category is known as “sensitive personal information” and includes precise geolocation data, race, religion, sexual orientation, Social Security numbers and certain health information.
  5. Finally, the new privacy law gives consumers the right of data portability, which means someone can tell a company to share their information with another company. It is like when someone changes their mobile phone or insurance companies.

What Businesses Need to Know About The California Privacy Rights Act

Businesses will also have a host of new duties that apply to them:

  1. Companies will have to create data silos, meaning they will have to keep personal information used in marketing separate from other consumer information. Companies, especially smaller ones, are already struggling to meet the existing consumer rights of access, review, deletion and opt-out. The new provision could compound the compliance issues.
  2. The most significant change for businesses will be the requirement that companies update agreements with contractors and sub-contractors that bind them to meet the provisions of the CPRA. In past podcast episodes, the ITRC has talked about data breaches resulting from “supply chain attacks.” That is where a company has good cybersecurity. Still, a third-party vendor ends up breached, and the company’s customer data is exposed. The requirement to update agreements with contractors and sub-contractors is designed to address supply chain attacks and clarify that everyone in the supply chain is responsible for protecting consumer information.
  3. Businesses do get some benefits in the CPRA. Employee and B2B data are exempt from the law until at least 2023, and businesses may be charged fees if consumers opt-out of data collection and sharing. That provision is the reason privacy advocates joined Big Tech companies to oppose the CPRA.

Toughest Privacy Law in the United States

The CPRA will be the toughest privacy law in the U.S. when it goes into full effect in 2023. In the meantime, state officials will propose the regulations needed to implement the new law. In the case of the CPRA, there will also be a new state agency created to enforce the new privacy law. For now, the California Attorney General will continue to enforce the existing law, CCPA.

Privacy Law Passed in Massachusetts

There was another state privacy law recently approved by a vote in Massachusetts. Car owners now have the right to see the information their car is wirelessly sharing with automakers. Approximately 75 percent of voters approved the proposal; carmakers have until 2022 to comply.

notifiedTM 

For information about recent data breaches, consumers and businesses should visit the ITRC’s new data breach tracking tool, notifiedTM. It is updated daily and free to consumers. Organizations that need comprehensive breach information for business planning or due diligence can access as many as 90 data points through one of the three paid notified subscriptions. Subscriptions help ensure the ITRC’s identity crime services stay free.  

Contact the ITRC

If you have a question about The California Privacy Rights Act, data privacy, or if you receive a breach notice and you’d like to know how to protect yourself, contact the ITRC. You can speak with an expert advisor toll-free at 888.400.5530 or by live-chat on the company website. Also, download the free ID Theft Help App to access resources, a case log and much more. 

Join us on our weekly data breach podcast to get the latest perspectives on the last week in breaches. Subscribe to get it delivered on your preferred podcast platform.  

  • Data breaches are down 30 percent in Q3 of 2020 compared to Q3 of 2019 when you look at the Blackbaud ransomware attack as a single event. 
  • Data breaches are down 10 percent in Q3 of 2020 compared to Q3 of 2019 when you look at the Blackbaud ransomware attack as a series of data breaches.  
  • Regardless of how the Blackbaud ransomware attack is viewed, the number of individuals impacted by a data breach is down nearly two-thirds.  
  • Anyone who believes they are a victim of a data breach is encouraged to contact the Identity Theft Resource Center to learn more about the next step to take. Victims can call toll-free at 888.400.5530 or live-chat with an expert-advisor on the company website. 

2020 has seen many different data breach trends. In the first half of 2020, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) reported a 33 percent decrease in data breaches and a 66 percent decrease in individuals impacted. The ITRC has compiled the Q3 2020 data breach statistics, and the number of compromises has dropped. However, there is one data breach that skews all the data. 

Two Ways to Look at the Numbers 

With the ongoing global pandemic and one particularly nasty ransomware attack against IT service provider, Blackbaud, reported in the third quarter, the Q3 numbers can be interpreted in two ways. 

Data Breaches Down 30 Percent Treating Blackbaud as a Single Event 

If we treat the Blackbaud attack as a single event, the number of data compromises reported so far in 2020 remains well below the 2019 trend line, with nearly a 30 percent decrease year-over-year. Looking at the rest of 2020, absent a significant data breach, 2020 could end with just over 1,000 data breaches. That would be the lowest number of breaches in five years, dating back to 2015. 

Data Breaches Down 10 Percent Treating Blackbaud as a Series of Breaches 

If the Blackbaud ransomware attack is treated as a series of data breaches, the year-over-year trend line changes significantly. However, the number of data breaches is still down in comparison to 2019. There have been 247 data breaches reported as a result of the Blackbaud ransomware attack. Once you add those to the overall number of data compromises, we go into Q4 with a 10 percent decrease in data breaches compared to this time last year.  

Individuals Impacted by Data Breaches Down Two-Thirds 

No matter how Blackbaud is categorized, one data point remains the same: the number of individuals who have been impacted in 2020 by an information breach. So far in 2020, roughly 292 million people have had their personal information compromised, nearly two-thirds fewer people than in 2019. The ITRC will have more information to share on our Q3 Data Breach Trends Report, which will be released later in October. We will also discuss the details on our sister podcast, The Fraudian Slip, in two weeks. 

Subscribe to the Weekly Breach Breakdown Podcast 

Every week, the ITRC looks at some of the top data compromises from the previous week, and other relevant cybersecurity news in our Weekly Breach Breakdown podcast. This week, we are looking at the Q3 data breach trends and the latest numbers.  

notifiedTM 

For more information about recent data breaches, or any of the data breaches discussed in Q3, consumers and businesses should visit the ITRC’s new data breach tracking tool, notified. It is updated daily and free to consumers. Organizations that need comprehensive breach information for business planning or due diligence can access as many as 90 data points through one of the three paid notified subscriptions. Subscriptions help ensure the ITRC’s identity crime services stay free. 

Contact the ITRC 

If you receive a breach notice due to the Blackbaud ransomware attack or any other data compromise and want to know what steps to take to protect yourself, contact one of the ITRC expert advisors by phone toll-free 888.400.5530, or by live-chat on the company website. Victims of a data breach can also download the free ID Theft Help App to access advisors, resources, a case log and much more. 

Join us on our weekly data breach podcast to get the latest perspectives on the last week in breaches. Subscribe to get it delivered on your preferred podcast platform. 


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