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If you pulled up in your driveway and saw an orange extension cord running from your exterior outlet to your neighbor’s house, you might have something to say about it. If your neighbors ran a long wire to your cable box to steal your cable, you would probably do something about that as well.

But your neighbors could be stealing your internet connection without your knowledge. Without the need for wires or cords, they could have gained access and your signal strength could be suffering. Worse, you don’t know what kind of activity they’re engaging in over your connection, or what else they may be able to infiltrate over your wifi.

There are a few ways you can tell if someone—a neighbor or even someone paused nearby in a vehicle—is using your internet connection:

1. Internet Slowdown – if your internet connection is suddenly slower, meaning web pages don’t load like they once did or your favorite videos just display an icon circling around instead of playing, you might be running too many devices on your connection. If you know that you haven’t increased the number of computers, phones, tablets, laptops, or IoT devices, someone else may have joined.

2. Check Your Connection Settings – if you can access the app for your router (the box that turns your modem into a signal broadcaster so wireless devices can reach it) or visit the manufacturer’s website to see your account, you should be able to see how many devices are connected to your network. Their customer service department can help you with this step.

Once you find out if someone else has jumped on your connection, it’s actually a pretty easy fix. First, password protect your wifi network, which is a good idea even if no one has been using your connection; however, if you already had a password in place, then the outsider has gained access to it somehow, so simply change it. Also, be sure to check for any available updates to your router’s software since outdated software could have vulnerabilities that outsiders can exploit.

Unfortunately, if someone has been using your wifi, there’s a chance they also accessed sensitive information about you and your family. Change the passwords on all of your sensitive accounts like email, banking, and retail shopping sites, and monitor your accounts for any suspicious activity.


Read next: “Don’t Get Scrooged by a Holiday Scam”

Privacy experts and advocates have long warned about some of the threats from the Internet of Things. Our connected smart home devices have the potential to spy on us, to gather, track, and spread our sensitive information and internet activity, and even to become a target for hackers.

Unfortunately, the increasingly common combination of IoT connectivity and a child’s toy can lead to a bone-chilling scenario in which information about your family member is shared online. Previous data breaches involving kids’ apps and IoT toys have grabbed entire customer databases of children’s information, in some cases even including names, addresses and photos of the kids.

As the Internet of Things becomes more widespread and the “it toy” of the holiday season lines the retailers’ shelves, it’s important that consumers do their research before making their purchases.

One great resource is the annual Trouble in Toyland report, which highlights a variety of dangers of popular toys. These dangers range from things like choking hazards to privacy questions, so it’s an all-encompassing type of report. In its 33 years, this report has been responsible for more than 150 toy recalls.

But when shopping for any kind of electronic or interactive toy, consumers can keep a few guidelines in mind before committing to this new purchase:

1. Do you need to register the device or create an account to use it? – Registering your new purchase can protect you in a number of ways, including recall updates and warranty validity. However, do you need to include every piece of information? Do you have to register your child’s information or create an online account in order to use this toy? That might give you pause, depending on the information requested, the age and ability of your kids, and your comfort level with their internet use.

2. Do you leave it turned on at all times in order for it to work? – If this device needs to be left powered on at all times, you might want to think about incorporating it into your household. Besides the drain on your utilities and your home data use for a toy or gadget that might not get used all the time, an “always on” device can lead to security issues. If you can power the device off completely when not in use, it will save both your budget and your privacy.

3. Is your Wi-Fi network protected? – Wi-Fi connections need to be password protected to keep outsiders from jumping into your network. However, a lot of users with IoT-connected toys and household devices overlook the need to protect their wifi routers as well. If your router—the box that makes the internet connection work for all of your wireless gadgets—is unprotected, then anyone who accesses your laptop through a virus could conceivably travel over to your other devices via the router.

As parents and grandparents, it’s understandable to want to give your young family members something from their holiday wish lists, but rushing into a purchase isn’t the best course of action. Do your research and make sure you’re bringing the device into a secure environment before buying.

There’s one final consideration to make when purchasing a new connected toy, especially if it’s an upgrade on a previous version: don’t discard any old connected toys without completely wiping their stored data and deleting any apps or accounts that powered it. If you can’t be sure that any sensitive information is gone from the device—including its usage history, stored identifying information, and more—then physically damage the internal components before discarding it. Remember to look for a responsible recycler so that potentially harmful internal materials don’t end up in the environment.


Read next: “Boss Phishing Bah Humbug: Don’t Fall for this Holiday Scam!”