Gear up for your next vacation with advice on how to travel safe when it comes to technology and cybersecurity.

Be honest, show of hands who is ready to put this winter weather behind them and take a nice vacation? No matter if it is a glowing sandy beach escape or a picturesque mountain retreat, a vacation can be an instant pick me up after the winter blues.

Unfortunately, as too many travelers already know heading out of town can be filled with pitfalls. Lost luggage, sudden cancellations, unexpected illnesses are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to potential problems. However, there is a far more serious danger lurking for the would-be traveler with consequences that take years to recover from – identity theft.

Cybercriminals do not take vacations, so you cannot let your guard down where your identity, your financial data, even your gadgets are concerned. In fact, in many ways, traveling brings a whole new kind of cybersecurity threat, one that specifically targets people when they are away from home.

Once you have planned your getaway, there are a number of steps you must take to travel safe. Whether you are traveling within the country or abroad you should consider taking the below actions to protect your information.

Update and Backup all of Your Technology

If you are bringing any devices with you, now is the time to make sure they are updated to the most recent operating system. The same is true of your apps. When you continue to use an outdated piece of software or an old app, you are leaving yourself wide open to a data breach; developers often issue updates specifically because they have uncovered a security hole. While you are at it, make sure you save all of your important files, documents, or photos to a secure source at home, just in case someone does attack your device.

Disable your Wi-Fi

A simple slide with your fingertip is all it takes to prevent your mobile device from automatically connecting to unknown networks. These are the kinds of free Wi-Fi connections found in coffee shops, hotels, restaurants, airports, and more. Turning off the Wi-Fi will not only save your battery, it will stop lurkers from infiltrating your device over unsecured networks. Do not worry, you can turn it right back on whenever you are in range of a safe connection.

Power Up with Confidence

Avoid public charging stations if you can help it. Whether you use your own cord or use one that is provided, you cannot know where the cord’s connection will lead. In a scheme called “juicejacking,” criminals lure travelers into plugging in their devices for a quick charge, but the cord is actually connected to a hidden computer. The computer is downloading all of the files and information off the devices while you charge up, including usernames, passwords, account numbers, and more. If you can carry your own external charger battery or a “block” to plug into a regular power outlet, that would be much safer.

Passcodes, Passwords, and Pass it On

You might want to update your passcode lock on your mobile devices and your account passwords on sensitive accounts before you leave. That way, you are not enjoying a day out on the waves—and away from a phone or computer—when a hacker steals a database of old usernames and passwords, or steals access to your online bank account and credit card. If you can leave these passwords with a trusted family member, they can help you out if something goes wrong while you are out of pocket.

The Trip is Only Part of the Equation

Remember, your vacation basically starts (at least from a cybercriminal’s perspective) from the day you book the trip through the weeks after you have returned. Make sure you are booking your travels through a reputable company over a safe online connection, and that you are monitoring your accounts before, during, and long after your trip in order to watch out for suspicious activity.


Contact the Identity Theft Resource Center for toll-free, no-cost assistance at (888) 400-5530. For on-the-go assistance, check out the free ID Theft Help App from ITRC.

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