Summer has arrived, and usually that signals summer vacations, fun in the sun and time to enjoy summertime events. With the COVID-19 pandemic still impacting people in many ways, some summer plans will look different. It won’t stop scammers from targeting victims, but 2020 summer scams could have a different spin than summer scams in years past.

Employment Scams

Typically, employment scams are a hot summer scam because teachers, school transportation drivers, high school/college students and residents of resort areas look to make some extra money in the summer months. While that may end up still being the case, employment scams could be a 2020 summer scam because over 40 million people are unemployed due to COVID-19 and areas are now loosening restrictions.

Some telltale signs that a job might not be genuine include high hourly rates for minimal work, requirements to pay for supplies and materials, offers that request consumers to provide their sensitive identity credentials (driver’s license or Social Security number) to apply and offers that contain misspellings, vague information or links to click and software to download.

Loyalty Account Scams

Travel is usually at its peak in the summer months as families and friends embark on their vacation plans. However, travel is down due to the coronavirus and it is unknown how many people will be willing to take the risks associated with traveling. That is why scammers may attack loyalty accounts.

A popular 2020 summer scam could end up preying on loyalty accounts because people are not flying and staying at hotels. If anyone receives a message regarding a loyalty account, they should ignore it and reach out to the proper company directly. However, scammers could still strike with too-good-to-be-true offers or create fake websites and steal photos of real properties to lure in their victims. Travelers should avoid any high-pressure (i.e. “Book NOW to receive”) opportunities or messages about their accounts and investigate thoroughly before proceeding.

Moving Scams

Summer is a popular time to move, whether it is recent graduates or families waiting for their kids to finish the school year. Moving scams can still strike at any time. That means moving scams may make a resurgence as a popular 2020 summer scam. There are many different types of moving scams, but some of them involve taking information including PII and payment card information; hidden fees and companies that change their names to circumvent bad reviews.

Ticket Scams

Outdoor concerts, music festivals and big-name concert tours are great summer fun. Ticket scams could be a popular 2020 summer scam. Not because there will be concerts, music festivals and sporting events going on, but because sports and other outdoor activities have many unknowns regarding how ticket sales and refunds will work. Scammers can take advantage of the confusion by overcharging for an event through a fake website that steals people’s information and selling a fake ticket. Scammers have sent messages previously regarding ticket refunds with links to click or files to download. People should only purchase tickets from trusted retailers. If anyone gets a message they are not expecting about a ticket sale or refund, they should ignore it and contact the retailer directly.

Social Media Scams

People’s Facebook accounts and Instagram accounts are also a target when the weather turns warm. Everything from romance scammers and phishing attempts to burglars who scope out who is not home based on their posts can lead to harm. COVID-19 romance scams are already making the rounds and scammers could continue to use that tactic.

People should be mindful of what they post online. Also, they should beware of friend requests from accounts they do not recognize or requests from people they thought they were already connected with (i.e., hacked or spoofed accounts). Finally, people should make sure they are not oversharing or giving away too many details to anyone who can see them. Remember, there are things on social media accounts that could be used to determine the challenge questions for other more sensitive accounts (date of birth, pet’s name, mother’s maiden name, etc.).

If anyone falls for a summer scam or potentially self-compromises their identity information, they can live-chat with an Identity Theft Resource Center expert advisor that will help guide them through the next steps to take. They can also call toll-free at 888.400.5530.


You might also like…

DARK WEB DATA BREACH LEADS TO THIEVES STEALING FROM THIEVES

AERIES DATA BREACH AFFECTS SCHOOL DISTRICTS ACROSS CALIFORNIA

PURPORTED LIVEJOURNAL DATA BREACH LEADS TO 26 MILLION USER RECORDS BEING STOLEN